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Above left-right: name plate from a 1936 White Motor Company Model 706; a Fageol name plate, and a A.C.F. Brill nameplate. In a “now you know the rest of the story” moment, did you know that the name Fageol is pronounced as “fad-jull”, rhyming with “fragile”? Photos courtesy of kygelberhund.

BUS COMPANIES BEGINNING WITH THE LETTER “D”

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D.C. TRANSIT See DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA TRANSIT


DMC So far I’ve identified only one possibility for this badge. First, note the age, which can be determined by the 1930s style bus featured on the badge, and next is the high employee number. Dixie Motor Coach Corporation was founded in 1928 and was a large operation. (See Dixie Motor Coach Corporation for more information.) The badge here has two threaded posts and measures 2 ½”.

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DSR See Department of Street Railways.


DTC  See Denver Tramway Company.


DAHLONEGA-ATLANTA STAGE / DAHLONEGA-ATLANTA TRAILWAYS The company was supposedly operating in 1946, however, it’s not listed in the 1946 MTD. It is listed in the 1952, 1954 and 1956 MTD. The company was located in Dahlonega, Georgia, and served Atlanta, Gainsville and Jasper, Georgia, with 8 buses; Fred C. Jones, Sr. and wife were the owners. The general manager was Fred C. Jones, Jr. Fred Jones, Sr. has owned and operated Fred Jones Chevrolet Company in Dahlonega since 1938, and the bus company was a sideline. According to one source, the company joined the National Trailways Bus System in 1946 and remained until 1955; however, it is listed in the 1956 MTD. The company ran this ad in 1952: “DAHLONEGA- ATLANTA TRAILWAYS invites you to RIDE IN COMFORT – ENJOY THE SCENIC BEAUTY OF THE NORTH GEORGIA MOUNTAINS”. In December 1949 the company purchased a new Flxible Clipper bus. This is all that is known for now.

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DAHRINGER BUS & TAXI COMPANY Founded by M. J. Dahringer in Ludington, Michigan, the company was operating in the 1930s. There is a mention in the June 9, 1934, edition of the Ludington Daily News from Ludington, Michigan: “The New CHEVROLET GREYHOUND BUS NOW OWNED & OPERATED BY 4 THE Dahringer Bus Company This ultra-smart new bus, patterned after the Greyhound, is positively the last word in travel comfort, style and originality. Accommodates 10 passengers.” The company is again mentioned in the August 12, 1941 edition of the Ludington Daily News: “JENS W. JOHNSON In recognition of his 15-year record of bus driving without an accident, Michigan Mutual Liability company has presented Jens W. Johnson with a watch commemorating his accomplishment. This record means nearly a million miles of highway travel between the cities of Cadillac, Boyne City, Traverse, Ludington and j Petoskey, without an accident of any kind. Johnson was an employe of the Dahringer Bus & Taxi company of Ludington during that period.” The company was still operating out of Ludington in 1946.

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DAISY LINE In 1893 the Kentucky & Indiana Bridge & Railroad Co., jointly owned by three steam railroads from Indiana ran a steam passenger service across the Ohio River from Louisville, Kentucky into New Albany, Indiana and was known as the “Daisy Line.” “The passenger cars were painted yellow with brown trim resembling a black-eyed susan, hence the name Daisy Line.”

In 1905 the Daisy Line was taken over by the Louisville & Southern Indiana Traction Co.  This service continued until 1946 when the streetcars were replaced by buses, which ran until 1976.

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DALLAS TRANSIT CO. was in operation from 1964 thru 1984. The badge has two threaded posts and was made by BASTIAN BROS. CO. ROCHESTER N.Y. and measures 2¼” x 2 ⅜”.

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DALLAS RAILWAY COMPANY See DALLAS RAILWAY AND TERMINAL COMPANY.


DALLAS RAILWAY & TERMINAL COMPANY operated out of Dallas, Texas, from 1917 until ceasing operations in 1956. Below is a partial pedigree of this company:

1895-1898 Dallas City Railway Company (New Company formed to take ownership of Dallas Consolidated Traction Railway Company, which went into receivership.) 1898-1917 Dallas Consolidated and Electric Street Railway Company (acquired disposed property of the Dallas City Railway Company along with the Queens City Railway Company). 1899-1917 Rapid Transit Railway Company (acquired the Dallas Rapid Transit Company). 1900-1917 Northern Texas Traction Company (acquired the Dallas and Oak Cliff Elevated Railway). -1917 Metropolitan Street Railway Company. 1917-1926 Dallas Railway Company (merger of Dallas Consolidated and Electric Street Railway Company, Rapid Transit Railway Company and Metropolitan Street Railway Company as well as leasing of lines along the NTTC in Oak Cliff). 1926-1956 Dallas Railway & Terminal Company (Name change from the Dallas Railway Company.) 1956-1964 Dallas Transit Company (Name change from Dallas Railway & Terminal Company shortly after the last streetcar ran in January 1956.) In 1964, the city purchased the Dallas Transit Company, ending a 92-year run of private transit companies in Dallas)

The Dallas Transit System (DTS) was the transit service operated by the city of Dallas, from 1964 to 1988. DTS resulted from a consolidation of various privately owned transit companies and streetcar lines.  Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) formally took over operations of the DTS in 1988.

Three different badges are known: the first example made of brass, has one threaded post and one pin post; measures 2¼” x 1¾”; the early examples are marked “STELLMACHER & CLARK, INC. DALLAS”. The second example has two threaded posts and was made by Greenduck Co., Chicago; they measure 2⅜” x 2 ½”. There is a later example made of hard plastic with two different designs.

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Photo used by permission of eBay member tejas-books.

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Photos courtesy of kygelberhund.
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Photos used by permission of eBay member railway-stuff.

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DALLAS TRANSIT COMPANY See DALLAS RAILWAY AND TERMINAL COMPANY. 

DALLAS TRANSIT SYSTEM See DALLAS RAILWAY AND TERMINAL COMPANY. 


TOM DALTON BUS LINE was running out of Chattanooga, Tennessee, after 1916, serving Chickamauga, Georgia; by April 1920, the company expanded service to Lafayette, Chickamauga and Estelle, Georgia. By October 1921 Tom Dalton Bus Line had expanded its operations into Dayton and Soddy, Tennessee, as well as Lafayette and Davis Cross Roads in Georgia, with expanded service to Lafayette and Chickamauga, Georgia. The company was still operating on April 20, 1924, when it introduced two new Reo-built coaches, which were dubbed “Blue Gooses”.

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DAN PATCH BUS LINE was running in 1932 in Clay City, Indiana.

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DANVILLE CITY LINES was a subsidiary of National City Lines. In 1936 NCL bought Illinois Power & Light Company‘s streetcars in Danville, Illinois, and replaced the system with buses. (On December 15, 1936, at 12:15 AM IP&LC motorman Virgil Miller arrived at Redden square with car #225, which was the last run.) Danville City Lines ran until 1964 when it was replaced by Bee Line Transit Corporation, which was owned by American Transit Corporation. The badge is nickel–plated metal, has two threaded posts, measures 2½” x 3″ and although there are no markings on the back, it is likely a Greenduck Co. Chicago production.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member godislove2.

DANVILLE-LAFAYETTE MOTOR BUS COMPANY / DANVILLE-LAFAYETTE BUS COMPANY Apparently these were two different companies, judging by this news item in the October 3, 1925, edition of the Indianapolis News from Indianapolis, Indiana: “. . . the public utilities commission had authorized the sale of the Danville-Lafayette Motor Bus Company line to the Danville-Lafayette Bus Company for $8,000.” The Danville-Lafayette Motor Bus Company line ran an intercity route from Danville, Illinois, to Lafayette, Indiana. The Danville-Lafayette Bus Company operated from Whiting, Indiana.

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DANVILLE-TERRE HAUTE LIMITED BUS COMPANY ran operated between Danville, Illinois, to Terre Haute, Indiana, in 1920. It is mentioned in a May 22, 1925 newspaper article, and was still operating in 1928.

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DANVILLE TRACTION & POWER CO., headquartered in Danville, VA., was incorporated in 1911 to take over the Danville Railway & Electric Co., and operated as an electric railway until December 4, 1936, when buses took over.  Badge has two threaded posts and is made of chrome plated brass.

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DARDANELLE STAGE LINE was operating out of Sonora, California, in 1924. C. F. Whipple was the registered contact.

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DARLING BUS LINE, INC. began running in 1915 from Sayre, Pennsylvania, to Dolgeville. The operation “resulted in pulling off every passenger train on the Dolgeville Railroad.” In July 1925 it was purchased by the New York State Railway Company: “July 25, 1925, The Evening Times from Sayre, Pennsylvania; It is announced today that the New York State Railway Company, large upstate trolley system, has secured an option on the Darling auto bus line, running from this city to Johnstown. It is also stated that control of the bus line and franchise will be transferred at once. The bus line has been covering the missing unit in cross-state trolley service between here and Johnstown for the past few months. Its control by the New York State Railway Company now completes the gap.

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O. B. DARNELL BUS LINE began operations in 1940 running buses to Clinchport, Dungannon and Fort Blackmore, Virginia, carrying approximately 15,000 passengers monthly. July 1949 Frances Mae Franklin, manager of the O.B. Darnell Bus Lines, obtained a certificate of operation between Gate City, Virginia and Kingsport, Tennessee. The company is not listed in any edition of the MTD for the 1940s-1950s.

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DARWIN & OLANCHA STAGE LINE was operating in the mid 1920s out of Olancha, California. M.V. Butler was the registered contact.

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DAVIS AUTO TOURS, INC. was operating in the late 1920s out of Santa Barbara, California. Silas Davis was the owner/president/general manager.

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DAVIS MOTOR LINES, INC. / B. F. DAVIS MOTOR BUS LINES, INC. This company is found listed several ways. In a 1925 ad for the new Red Ball Bus Terminal in Indianapolis, Indiana, the company is advertised as B.F. Davis Motor Bus Lines. It is listed in 1927 as B.F. Davis Motor Lines, Inc. It was an intercity operation based in Indianapolis running to Terre Haute, Indiana. It was still operating in 1931.

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DAY-BROOK BUS LINES / DAY-BROOK COACH LINES I can find no mention of a Day-Brook Coach Lines in any of my reference works, nor on the Internet. However, I do find info for Day-Brook Bus Lines. That company was a charter service bus company headquartered at 4178 Saylor Street in Dayton, Ohio. Its owner was Dave Duberstein. In addition to a charter service, it held a certificate of operation to provide commuter service between Dayton and Brookville, Ohio, hence the name of the company. The first mention I find of the company is in 1971. By 1978 the company announced it was losing money on the commuter route, but was trying to hold onto its certificate. By 1980 the company seems to have disappeared. The badge is marked “Day Brook Coach Lines” and is made of nickel-plated metal with two threaded posts.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member e-zwolf.

DAYTON-GREENVILLE BUS COMPANY There’s not much info on this company other than it was running in the late 1920s through the 1950s. It is mentioned in the June 19, 1930, edition of The Richmond Item from Richmond, Indiana: “Beginning Thursday of this week, the bus line from Greenville to Richmond, which operates through New Paris, will be taken over by the Dayton-Greenville Bus company. This company now has several buses in operation, and A. J. Wetzel, present owner, who resides in Greenville, made the sale last week of his line.” It is mentioned in January 1943 in a newspaper item about one of its employees. The other mention is in December 1954 when the company is noted as serving the bus terminal in Lima, Ohio, and running between Lima and Fort Wayne, Indiana. The company is not mentioned in the 1930 edition of the Ohio Motor Bus Association, nor the 1935, 1939 edition Russell’s Guide, nor the various issues of relevant MTD.

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DAYTON & SOUTHEASTERN LINES was incorporated in 1935 in Jamestown, Ohio. Original route: Dayton-Springfield-Chillicothe. It operated until 1972.

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DAYTON STREET RAILWAY COMPANY / DAYTON STREET TRANSIT COMPANY of Dayton, Ohio, built its first streetcar line in 1869. The horse drawn line took 1 hour and 20 minutes to travel from West Third Street at Western Avenue to East Third Street at Findlay Street. The company later electrified its system and, on April 23, 1933, ran its first trolley buses. The company was renamed Dayton Street Transit Company and on April 12, 1941, was sold to City Railway Company. This purchase was followed in 1945 when City Railway Company bought People’s Railway Company. In 1946 City Railway Company was running 55 electric passenger cars over 28 route miles along with 45 trolley buses over 29 route miles and 11 gas-powered buses over 23 route miles. The last streetcar line operating in Dayton, was City Railway Company’s route 1-Third Street, which was converted to trolley buses on September 28, 1947. In 1952 the company was running 6 buses over 122 route miles, and 164 trolley buses over 71 route miles. On November 1, 1955, City Railway Company merged with Dayton & Xenia Railway Company, forming City Transit Company. In 1972 City Transit Company became the publicly owned Miami Valley Regional Transit Authority, which, in 2003, was renamed Greater Dayton Regional Transit Authority. (For more history, see the listings under The Oakwood Street Railway Company, People’s Railway Company/People’s Transit Company and Dayton & Xenia Railway Company.)

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THE DAYTON SUBURBAN BUS LINES, INC. According to one source, this company’s origins starts with Wolf Brothers Bus Line back in 1929 in Dayton, Ohio. That company was acquired by The Oakwood Street Railway and operated as a bus subsidiary. It was renamed The Dayton Suburban Bus Lines, Inc. In 1946 it ran 19 buses over 17.9 route miles. It shared the same management and facilities as The Oakwood Street Railway Company. In 1956 the company was running 19 buses over 20.3 route miles. The badge is die-pressed and has a single threaded post.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member bessiebug05.

DAYTON & XENIA RAILWAY COMPANY, INC. / DAYTON & XENIA MOTOR BUS COMPANY Dayton & Xenia Railway Company began operating a interurban passenger line between Dayton and Xenia, Ohio, in 1906. In 1937 the company began operating buses as a subsidiary named Dayton & Xenia Motor Bus Company. In 1940 the company replaced its streetcars with trolley buses. In 1946 the company was operating 8 gas buses over 17 route miles; it operated 12 trolley coaches over 5 route miles. In 1955 the company was running 15 buses over 32 route miles; later that year the company merged with City Railway Company and formed City Transit Company. In 1972 City Transit Company became the publicly owned Miami Valley Regional Transit Authority, which, in 2003, was renamed Greater Dayton Regional Transit Authority.

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DE LUXE MOTOR STAGES / DE LUXE TRAILWAYS De Luxe Motor Stages of Illinois was founded in the 1930s by Ben Kramer and C. J. Villeneuve when they acquired a bus as a result of a bad business deal. The route was from Chicago to St. Louis via Hammond, Indiana, Kankakee, and Decatur, Illinois. By the late 1930s the company had joined the National Trailways System. In 1941 the company had purchased another Trailways member, Empire Trailways, which ran from Chicago to Columbus, Ohio, via Ft. Wayne, Indiana. In 1943 De Luxe Motor Stages also purchased Greenville-Dayton Transportation Company. In 1956 the company was running 14 buses over 640 route miles.

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DEAKON-WALTON BUS LINE began operating in October 1919 from Chattanooga, Tennessee, to Dayton, Tennessee.

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DEAN OF ITHACA, INC. was a trucking, moving, storage and bus company that was registered in New York on July 3, 1925. It was named for its founder, Harold Dean. In addition to its service, in 1928 the company was advertising parcel delivery. In 1963 it was listed as one of five bus companies operating in Ithaca. The company seems to have been out of business by the 1970s. The company is not listed in the 1946, 1954 nor 1956 MTD.

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DEAR STAGE LINES was operating in Taft, California, in 1924; Robert C. Dear was the owner.

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DEARBORN COACH COMPANY On January 1, 1932, the licence of Detroit Motorbus Company was revoked by the city Common Council to operate buses in Detroit, Michigan, which forced the company out of business. A group of former Detroit Motorbus Company’s managers formed Lake Shore Coach Lines and acquired their former company’s eastern suburban bus routes. Starting with 52 buses, another group of former employees formed Dearborn Coach Company on February 18, 1932, to take over their former company’s western suburban routes. In 1933 Dearborn Coach Company took over Lincoln Park Bus Company, which it renamed Lincoln Park Coach Company. In 1946 new owners took over Dearborn Coach Company, and operated 132 buses over 222 route miles. In October 1950 the company, and its subsidiary, Lincoln Park Coach Company, were renamed Intertown Suburban Lines Corporation. (See Intertown Suburban Lines, Corporation for more information.) The badge measures 2 ½ ” X 2″ and made of brass with a single threaded post.

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DeBolt Lines Inc (Pittsburgh PA) 1959


DECAMP BUS LINES was established as stage coach company by Major Jonathan W. DeCamp in 1870 running a route from Roseland to Newark, New Jersey. The company acquired first motor bus in 1909. In the 1950s it operated the Garden State Bus Lines, in Clifton, New Jersey. DeCamp Bus Lines is still in business. (A detailed history of the company can be found here: DeCamp Company History) The badge is die-pressed, nickel-plated brass with one threaded post, one pin post and measures 2¼” x 1¾”.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member Penn2000.

DECATUR CITY LINES was operated by National City Lines providing bus service for Decatur, Illinois. In 1936 it succeeded the Illinois Power & Light Co., which ran streetcars in the city. In 1972 it was succeeded by Decatur Public Transit System.

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DECATUR ELECTRIC STREET RAILWAY COMPANY succeeded the Decatur Street Railroad Company in 1889 and ran until 1891 serving Decatur, Illinois.

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DECATUR PUBLIC TRANSIT SYSTEM is the primary provider of mass transportation in Macon County, Illinois. Fourteen main routes, plus one downtown shuttle using replica trolleys, serve the region. After the removal of streetcars from the city in 1936, the private National City Lines ran the area’s bus services until 1971. Beginning in 1972 DPTS has proved public transit for the city and surrounding communities.

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DECATUR RAILWAY & LIGHT COMPANY succeeded the Decatur Traction & Electric Company in Decatur, Illinois. It ran from 1903 until 1904 and was succeeded by the Illinois Traction Company.

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DECATUR STREET RAILWAY provided streetcar service in Decatur, Alabama, prior to 1904. It was succeeded by North Alabama Traction Company.

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DECATUR STREET RAILROAD COMPANY ran in Decatur, Illinois from 1876 until 1889 when it was taken over by the Decatur Electric Street Railway Company.

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DECATUR TRACTION & ELECTRIC COMPANY ran in Decatur, Illinois, from 1900 until 1903 and was succeeded the Decatur Railway & Light Company.

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DECATUR TRANSIT, INC. served Decatur, Austinville, Fairview, Priceville and Somerville, Alabama. It was running in the 1940s, and in 1956 it had 10 buses running over 56 route miles. It also was a shipping carrier and ran taxi cabs.

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DEEP SPRINGS AUTO STAGE was operating in 1924 out of Bid Pine, California. Abe Ransome was the registered contact.

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DEER PARK TRANSPORTATION COMPANY, INC. There’s not much info on this company, other than it was operating out of Jervis, New York, in the mid 1940s. The company is mentioned in the 1946 Mass Transportation’s Directory, with an address at 7 Canal Street. (There no info on the type of operation, fleet numbers or routes. However, judging by later advertisements for the company, it appears to have been a charter bus operation.) In 1948 it is mentioned in a Paterson, New Jersey, newspaper story when one of its buses, driven by Alfred Maillet, Jr. struck a car injuring two teenagers. The company was advertising in 1957 as providing charter buses “for all occasions.” At that time it was still located in Port Jervis. I can find no mention of the company after that date. The badge is nickel-plated brass with one threaded post.  It measures 2⅝” x 1⅝”.

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Photos used by permission of Dan Pauley.

Deere Brothers (Pittsburgh PA) 1959


DEFENSE TRANSPORTATION COMPANY When America entered World War II the nation’s defense industry kicked into full production. Tens of thousands of aircraft workers were employed throughout Kansas building planes, and most of those jobs were centered in Wichita. Boeing built the B-29 bombers. Beech Aircraft Company and Cessna Aircraft Company built various military aircraft models. All those workers needed transportation, and the easiest mode was buses. In 1927 Wichita Railroad & Light Company (and its subsidiary, Wichita Motor Bus Company) changed its name to Wichita Transportation Corporation. In 1935 the company discontinued streetcar operations. When America entered World War II, the company the company formed Emergency Transportation, Inc. to run buses from downtown Wichita to the three aircraft production plants. Their service began on July 20, 1942. That same month the City of Wichita City commission granted a franchise to the

Defense Transportation Company. E. H. Toombs, headed this newly-formed company, which augmented the Emergency Transportation, Inc.’s service. Their fare was 10¢. The Defense Transportation Company used school buses and scheduled pick-up stops near schools all over Wichita, as well as picking up passengers at any intersection on the routes to Beech, Cessna and Boeing plants.

By December 1945 the Wichita Transportation Corporation, operating 126 buses, carried 30 million passengers, while the Defense Transportation Company, operating 14 buses, carried 3 million passengers. By April 1947 Emergency Transportation Inc. was still operating, but the Defense Transportation Company seems to have been shut down. Indeed, in September 1945 the company was advertising in local newspapers to sell off “at 25 per cent or more below ceiling prices, a number of 1939, 1940 and 1942 Ford, Chevrolet and Dodge Trucks and buses.” Their address was given as 309 N. Market St., Wichita, Kansas.

There are two known badges for Defense Transportation Company. The first is an old style made of die-pressed nickel with two threaded posts. The second is a nickel-plated brass with two threaded post. Neither have any makers marks.

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Photos courtesy of kygelberhund.
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Photo courtesy of kygelberhund.

DELAWARE COACH COMPANY, INC. was originally incorporated as the Wilmington & Philadelphia Traction Company on June 25, 1910 and operated an electric street railway line from Wilmington, Delaware, to Chester, Pennsylvania, and to Philadelphia. The company formed a subsidiary named Southern Pennsylvania Traction Company to lease a number of transportation companies operating in southern Pennsylvania. On August 10, 1922 the Southern Pennsylvania Bus Company was incorporated to run a route from the city of Chester, Pennsylvania to the Delaware State Line, and between the city of Chester and Buckman Village. After trackless trolleys and buses replaced streetcars in 1941 Wilmington & Philadelphia Traction Company changed its name to the Delaware Coach Company. (See Southern Pennsylvania Bus Company for more information.) There are two known badges. The early badge is die pressed, convex shaped, measures about 3 ½” x 1⅝” and was made by Whitehead and Hoag Company of Newark, New Jersey. The later badge is nickel-plated brass, has a threaded post and pin post, and also was made by Whitehead and Hoag Company.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member nisa1609.

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Photos courtesy of eBay member janiebeer.

DELAWARE RAPID TRANSIT COMPANY was a intercity bus company that, in 1921, ran a bus line between Delaware City and Wilmington, Delaware. It also ran to Middletown and Odessa, via St. George.

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DELEO & SONS STAGE LINE was running a passenger service in Jefferson County, Washington, in 1923. The company was owned by Mike Deleo and sons, Mike & Frank Deleo. They sold out in May 1926 to Wolverton Auto Bus Company.

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DELTA BUS COMPANY, INC. The company was running in the 1960s, and incorporated in 1966. It was operating out of Saginaw, Michigan, and mostly ran a charter service. It was owned by Stanley Cupp, who also owned Valley Coach Lines, Inc., Mercury Bus Lines of Bay City and Cupp’s Schoolway Lines.

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DELTA MOTOR COACHES served Parkin, Earl, Neuhardt, Hughes, West Memphis, Forrest City, Widener, Madison, Turrell and Crawfordsville, Arkansas, and Memphis Tennessee. The badge shown here is made of brass and cloisonné and has two threaded posts. In 1946 the company ran 4 buses over 246 route miles.

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DeLUXE MOTOR STAGES, INC. was founded by Frank Arquillo in June 1929 in Detriot, Michigan. In the 1950s it was running from Plymouth, Michagan to downtown Detriot. In 1956 it ran 24 buses over 554 route miles.

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De  LUXE [Deluxe] MOTOR STAGES of ILLINOIS, INC. / DE LUXE TRAILWAYS was founded by Ben Kramer and C. J. Villeneuve when they acquired a bus as a result of a bad business deal. The route was from Chicago to St. Louis via Hammond, Indiana, Kankakee, and Decatur, Illinois. By the late 1930s the company had joined the National Trailways System. In 1941 the company had purchased another Trailways member, Empire Trailways, which ran from Chicago to Columbus, Ohio via Ft. Wayne, Indiana. In 1943 De Luxe Motor Stages also purchased Greenville-Dayton Transportation Company. In 1956 it was running 14 buses over 640 route miles. The DELUXE MOTOR STAGES DEPOT was located at 746 S. Wabash Ave. in downtown Chicago. The badge is nickel-plated with enamel paint and a single threaded post.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member penn2000.

THE DENCO LINE, based in Hugo, Oklahoma. The badge was made by Hook-Fast, Providence, R.I., single threaded post.
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DENVER-COLORADO SPINGS-PUEBLO MOTORWAY, INC. From Jon’s Trailways History Corner: “DCSP Motorway’s ownership was divided amongst three parties. Rio Grande Motorway owned 50%, the Colorado & Southern Railway (subsidiary of the Burlington [Northern Railroad]) who owned 25% and I. B. James, owner of Denver Interurban Bus Co., who operated locally between Denver and Boulder. In 1935 the Burlington bought out James’ interest giving them 50% interest balancing the Rio Grande’s 50% and James became general manager of the entire Burlington bus operation. Originally, DCSP only operated as far south as Pueblo, but in 1929, Southern Colorado Motor Way was purchased giving DCSP routes from Pueblo to Walsenburg and also from Pueblo to Canyon City and Pueblo to La Junta. With this route structure, DCSP would operate into the late 50’s.”

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DENVER & CROWN HILL RAILWAY COMPANY ran a passenger bus line from Denver Colorado, to Crown Hill Cemetery in 1928-1929.

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DENVER & INTERURBAN MOTOR COMPANY / DENVER & INTERURBAN TRAILWAYS The history of this company begins with the Colorado & Southern Railway, which, in 1904, organized the Denver & Interurban Railroad to run between Denver and Boulder, Colorado. Facing stiff competition from independent jitney operators, in 1926 the Colorado & Southern Railway’s subsidiary, Denver & Interurban Motor Company, applied to the Colorado Public Utilities Commission to operate a passenger and express motor transportation line from Denver to Boulder, Colorado, and Eldorado Springs, Colorado. The commission granted the application on March 7, 1927. Thereafter, the Colorado & Southern Railway discontinued the Denver & Interurban Railroad electric cars in favor of the Denver & Interurban Motor Company. By 1930 the company was operating 10 buses. The company joined the National Trailways Bus System in 1938 as the Denver & Interurban Trailways. It is listed in the 1939 Russell’s Guide with T. L. James as superintendent. According to one source, the Trailways routes were transferred to Burlington Trailways in 1942.

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DENVER-LIMON BUS LINES was operating in 1927 out of Denver, Colorado. It transferred its certificate of operation to The Paradox Land and Transport Co. on July 30, 1927.

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DENVER-COLORADO SPRINGS-PUEBLO MOTOR WAY / DENVER-COLORADO SPRINGS-PUEBLO TRAILWAYS Denver-Colorado Springs-Pueblo Motor Way was formed in 1926 as a subsidiary of the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad. It joined Trailways in 1936 and was operating between Denver, Colorado, and Trinidad. In August 1947 American Bus Lines, Inc. announced a consolidation of 19 bus companies: American Bus Lines, Inc., Burlington Trailways, Continental Trailways, Crescent Trailways, Dixie-Sunshine Trailways, Denver-Colorado Springs-Pueblo Trailways, Denver-Salt Lake-Pacific Trailways, Eastern Trailways, Georgia Trailways, Indiana Railroad, Mo-Ark Trailways, Modern Trailways, Mucatine-Davenport and Clinton Bus Company, Pony Express, Service Stages, Southeastern Greyhound Lines, Santa Fe Trailways, Utah-Idaho Central Railroad and West Coast Trailways. At the time American Bus Lines  was engaged in a lawsuit with Pacific Greyhound and Southern Pacific Railroad for equal rights on Pacific Coast highways. In 1948 the company was sold to Transcontinental Bus System / Continental Trailways.

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DENVER – SALT LAKE-PACIFIC STAGES / DENVER – SALT LAKE – PACIFIC TRAILWAYS Denver-Salt Lake-Pacific Stages was formed in 1935 as a subsidiary of Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad. It joined Trailways in 1936, operating between Denver and Salt Lake City via Steamboat Springs, Colorado. In August 1947 American Buslines, Inc. [sic] announced a consolidation of 19 bus companies: American Buslines, Inc., [sic] Burlington Trailways, Continental Trailways, Crescent Trailways, Dixie-Sunshine Trailways, Denver-Colorado Springs-Pueblo Trailways, Denver-Salt Lake-Pacific Trailways, Eastern Trailways, Georgia Trailways, Indiana Railroad, Mo-Ark Trailways, Modern Trailways, Mucatine-Davenport and Clinton Bus Company, Pony Express, Service Stages, Southeastern Greyhound Lines, Santa Fe Trailways, Utah-Idaho Central Railroad and West Coast Trailways. At the time American Bus Lines was engaged in a lawsuit with Pacific Greyhound and Southern Pacific Railroad for equal rights on Pacific Coast highways. In 1948 the company was sold to Transcontinental Bus System / Continental Trailways.

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THE DENVER & STEAMBOAT SPRINGS STAGE COMPANY ran from Denver, Colorado, to Steamboat Springs, Colorado in the 1930s.

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DTC / DENVER TRAMWAY / THE DENVER CITY TRAMWAY COMPANY / THE DENVER TRAMWAY COMPANY / THE DENVER TRAMWAY CORPORATION The Denver Tramway Company, operating in Denver, Colorado, was a streetcar system incorporated in 1886. The name “tramway” was unusual in the United States, and it is not known why company organizers chose the name. By 1893, the owners of the Denver Tramway Company consolidated their two nominally independent companies—the Denver Tramway Company, which served Denver proper, and the Metropolitan Railway Company, which served the suburbs—into The Denver Consolidated Tramway Company. It was the Silver Crash of 1893 that forced consolidation of four companies into The Denver City Tramway Company. (The four companies represented thirteen companies from previous mergers.) In 1924 the first Denver Tramway bus/trolley service began operating as a subsidiary.

In the 1920s The Denver Tramway Company operated as a holding company and ran bus lines as subsidiaries to avoid complicating their franchise agreements with the city of Denver, Colorado. The subsidiaries operated under revocable permits issued by the city. The first subsidiary was the Englewood & Fort Logan Bus Company, which was formed in 1924 and connected the end of streetcar Rt. 3 in Englewood with the Veterans Administration facilities at Fort  Logan. The second was the Fitzsimons Bus & Taxi Company, which connected Fitzsimons Army Hospital with downtown Denver along Colfax, 17th, and 18th Avenues. It was purchased by the Denver Tramway Company in 1929 and operated as a subsidiary until it was dissolved in 1943. A third subsidiary, Bus Transportation Company, was formed by the Tramway Company in 1927. It was absorbed into the Denver Tramway Company in 1933. During the 1940s The Denver Tramway Corporation, a subsidiary of The Denver Tramway Company, became a holding company for The Denver & Inter-Mountain Railway Company. By that time the Denver Tramway Corporation was operating buses as both local and intercity lines in Denver, Aurora, Englewood and Golden, Colorado.

In 1950 The Denver Tramway Corporation ran its last streetcars. In 1960 the company was operating 274 buses over 502 route miles.

From 1969 to 1971, the Denver Tramway Company continued service for the city and county of Denver. In 1971 the Denver Tramway Company transferred all of its assets to the city-owned Denver Metro Transit. In July 1974 Denver Metro Transit became part of the Regional Transportation District (RTD), the entity created to operate public transit services in eight of the twelve counties in the Denver-Boulder area.

There are several different known badges for the above companies, which are shown below.

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This is the earliest known badge and is made of die pressed nickel, has a pin back and measures 2 ¼” X 1¾”.
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Above, a die pressed, single threaded post, thin brass badge that measures 1 ⅜ x 2″. (Hallmarked on back “Sachs-Lawler Denver”.) Below, another version of the same badge made of solid copper/brass. Also marked “Sachs-Lawler Denver” on the reverse, note that it has solder on the back to affix the threaded post. I’ve seen numerous examples of this badge and all have solder residue. (Photos courtesy of kygelberhund.)

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A later embossed nickel badge that measures 1¾” on all three sides, has one threaded post and one pin post. Has Sachs-Lawlor makers mark.

DEPARTMENT OF STREET RAILWAYS / DETROIT STREET RAILWAYS / DSR The history of this company dates back to 1863 to Detroit City Railways Company. Between its founding and 1890, the company acquired several competing streetcar companies in Detroit, Michigan. It was reorganized in 1890 as Detroit Street Railway Company, and was sold in 1891 to Detroit Citizens Street Railway Company. In 1901 that company was merged into Detroit United Railway. The formation of the Department of Street Railways is told by Detroit Transit History.info: “In 1921, the City of Detroit launched its own separate street railway operation to compete with the privately-owned Detroit United Railway Company (DUR). After voter approval of various ballot proposals, the Municipal Operation (as it is often called) was able to expand and eventually take-over sections of DUR track, including downtown portions of two lines where the franchises had expired. Facing a future loss of additional trackage—with 54.5-miles of franchises due to expire in 1924—it was becoming evident that time was running out for the DUR. On March 13, 1922, the DUR decided to sell its city lines to the City of Detroit for $19,850,000. Beginning May 15, 1922, the city owned-and-operated Department of Street Railways (DSR) took-over all street railway operations within the city of Detroit, and in the suburbs of Highland Park, Hamtramck, and Springwells (Dearborn).”

The Department of Street Railways added bus service in 1925 when it created the Motorbus Division. In 1930 the DSR began operating trolley buses. At the height of its operation in 1941, the DSR operated 20 streetcar lines with 910 streetcars. On April 8, 1956, DSR’s last remaining streetcar line—Woodward Avenue—was converted to diesel bus operation. In 1974 the Department of Street Railways was taken over by the Detroit Department of Transportation, or DDOT. There are three badges shown. The first badge measures approx. 2 ½” x 1½”, was made by Metal Arts Company, Inc., Rochester, N.Y., and has one threaded post and one pin post. (This is pre-1940.) The second badge is reproduced from a 1944 photograph of a bus driver’s hat, and appears to be made of bakelite. The third badge was issued by the Detroit Department of Transportation, or DDOT. It is green and white enamel on metal, has one threaded post and one pin post. It measures approx. 2¾” x 1½”.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member 69ddgrt.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member 69ddgrt.

DEPOT MOTOR BUS LINE was in operating in Chicago, Illinois, in 1921. It was one of three motorbus companies that merged to form Chicago Motor Coach Company (i.e., Chicago Motor Bus Company, Chicago Stage Company and Depot Motor Bus Line). In 1922 Chicago Motor Coach Company was purchased by John D. Hertz, of Yellow Cab Company fame. Hertz merged Chicago Motor Coach and Fifth Avenue Motor Coach Corporation of New York in 1924 and thereby created Omnibus Corporation. In 1952 Chicago Motor Coach Company was taken over by Chicago Transit Authority.

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DERKUM STAGE LINES was operating in the mid 1920s out of Bakersfield, California. Paul Derkum was the owner / operator.

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DSR See Department of Street Railways.


DES MOINES SPRINGFIELD & SOUTHERN STAGES / DES MOINES SPRINGFIELD & SOUTHERN ROUTE This company was operating in the 1940s out of Sedalia, Missouri, in the Terry Hotel. It was owned and operated by Arnold B. Fletcher (1897-1970) and served the Sedalia Air Base at Knob Noster, Missouri (now Whiteman Air Force Base). In March 1951 Fletcher bought Ozark Trailways from A. W. Shepherd. By 1957 the company was operating 19 buses over 587 route miles and served Sioux City, Des Moines, Iowa; Sedalia and Springfield, Missouri. It controlled Ozark Trails, Inc. operating out of Springfield, Missouri.

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From a 1943 Sedalia newspaper ad.

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DES PLAINES MOTOR COACH LINE was founded in Des Plaines, Illinois, in 1927 and ran between Des Plaines, Illinois, and Jefferson Park, Chicago. The company was bought out by United Motor Coach Company in 1930.

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DETROIT BUS COMPANY ran 70 buses in Detroit, Michigan, in 1921.

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DETROIT-CHICAGO MOTOR BUS COMPANY, INC. was founded by Walter Nisun prior to 1927. In that year the company operated buses from Detroit to Chicago, from Chicago to St. Louis and from St. Louis to Kansas City, Kansas. After several legal confrontations in 1928 with Greyhound Lines, Inc. involving route disputes, which Greyhound won, the company failed in 1929. (Nisun also founded Sunny South Lines, NiSun Bus Lines and NiSun Lines, Ltd.)

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DETROIT MOTORBUS COMPANY / DETROIT MOTOR BUS COMPANY was organized in 1919 in Detroit, Michigan, by Herbert Y. McMullen. The company began its operations in 1920 with a fleet of ten double-decker buses built by Fifth Avenue Coach Company. However, unlike the Detroit United Railway, which had operated its streetcars through multi-year franchise agreements with the city of Detroit, the Common Council gave the Detroit Motorbus Company (DMB) a license to operate its service through day-to-day revocable permits, which meant that the city could cancel the company’s license at any time. On May 15, 1922, Detroit United Railway sold its Detroit streetcar system to the city of Detroit, which operated the system as the Department of Street Railways, or DSR. This new municipal ownership would eventually prove fatal for Detroit Motorbus Company, which is explained in Detroit Transit History: Detroit Motor Bus Company:

Surprisingly though, [Detroit Motor Bus Company’s] relationship with the city–owned DSR was rather friendly at first, with the DMB even providing service periodically on behalf of the city. . . . By 1930, Detroit Motorbus was operating with a fleet of 395 buses, over a network of both city and suburban bus routes. However, the company’s relationship with the City of Detroit would soon change.

“The arrival of the Great Depression years which followed 1929 began to take its toll on the city-owned DSR system. As factories closed, and patronage and revenues declined, the city was forced to place a number of its buses and streetcars into storage. To make matters worse, while most of the DSR buses traveled routes in the outlying and more thinly settled districts of the city, the Motorbus Company buses served more densely populated areas. It was even reported that the 350-plus buses of the DMB carried as many passengers as the almost six-hundred buses of the DSR. Consequently, with the municipal system facing financial difficulties the Common Council ordered the DMB to scale down a number of its competitive routes . . .

“In March of 1931, a number of Common Council members decided that instead of raising the fare to resolve the DSR’s financial problems, a take-over of the Motorbus Company’s routes might be a better solution, and instructed the Street Railway Commission to study the issue and report within thirty days. The Commission reported in favor of the acquisition and was authorized by the Council to begin negotiations with the company. In July the DMB offered to sell to the city the buses and garages needed to operate its city routes for $1,630,000, but the counter offer of $1,200,000 from the city was turned down. Negotiations between the Commission and the DMB would continue on during the summer and fall of 1931, but would fail to produce an agreement.

“Meanwhile, after the DSR’s receipts dropped by $2.5 million in 1931, Mayor Frank Murphy (1930-1933) declared that “there had been enough delay” and the time had come to act. Murphy felt it was time to complete what Hazen Pingree and James Couzens had begun by removing from Detroit streets the sole remaining private competitor of the DSR. In a hearing before the Council, Mayor Murphy declared, “If municipal ownership is to survive in Detroit, it must be municipal ownership only, one system over all our streets.” The mayor had apparently turned the tide in favor of an ouster, as the Council finally decided it must order the Detroit Motorbus Company off the streets of Detroit.

“On December 22, 1931, the Common Council voted to revoke the Detroit Motorbus Company’s day-to-day license to operate within the city of Detroit, effective on the close of business on December 31, 1931. As a result, effective Friday, January 1, 1932, the city-owned DSR became the sole provider of both street railway and motor coach operations within the city of Detroit. The Detroit Motorbus Company, for the most part, had been put out of business.”

After the city of Detroit put the Detroit Motorbus Company out of business and took over its routes, some former Detroit Motorbus Company’s managers formed the Lake Shore Coach Lines and acquired the former company’s eastern suburban bus routes. Another group of former Detroit Motorbus Company employees formed Dearborn Coach Company and acquired their former company’s western suburban routes. (In 1933 Dearborn Coach Company took over Lincoln Park Bus Company, which it renamed Lincoln Park Coach Company. In October 1950 the company, and its subsidiary, Lincoln Park Coach Company, were renamed Intertown Suburban Lines Corporation.)

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DETROIT STREET RAILWAYS  See Department of Street Railways.


DETROIT, TOLEDO & CLEVELAND BUS COMPANY ran in 1927 in Cleveland, Ohio.

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DETROIT & TOLEDO TRACKLESS COACH COMPANY operated between Detroit, Michigan, and Toledo, Ohio, in the early 1920s. It was acquired in 1927 by the Detroit United Railway Company and  consolidated into Highway Motorbus Company.

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DETROIT-TOLEDO TRANSPORTATION COMPANY operated between Detroit, Michigan, and Toledo, Ohio. It was founded in the early 1920s by Ralph A.L.Bogan (one of the founders of The Greyhound Corporation). In 1923 Bogan used the brand name, trade name, or service name of the Blue Goose Lines. It was purchased in late 1924 by the Detroit United Railway and consolidated into newly acquired subsidiary Highway Motorbus Co. In 1927, two bus companies, Interstate Stages and Detroit and Toledo Trackless Coach Co., were acquired by Detroit United Railway and consolidated into Highway Motorbus Co.

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DETROIT UNITED RAILWAY COMPANY A January 1, 1901, New Times article reported: “LANSING, Mich., Dec. 31 — Articles of association of the Detroit United Railway Company [DUR], capitalized at $12,500,000 were filed with the Secretary of State here to-day, together with o franchise fee of $6,000. The new company will take out the franchises and property of the Detroit Electric Street Railway.”According to Wikipeida, “Detroit United Railway Company was a transport company which operated numerous streetcar and interurban lines in southeast Michigan. Although many of the lines were originally built by different companies, they were consolidated under the control of the Everett-Moore syndicate, a Cleveland-based group of investors. The company incorporated on December 31, 1900, and continued to expand into the early 1920s through new construction and the acquisition of smaller concerns. After the DUR acquired the Detroit-Jackson line in 1907, it operated more than 400 miles of interurban lines and 187 miles of street city street railway lines. Beginning in 1922, however, the DUR began a process of devolution when it sold the local Detroit, Michigan streetcar system to the city, under the management of the Department of Street Railways (DSR). The company continued to abandon or sell properties throughout the 1920s; on September 26, 1928, the remainder was reorganized as the Eastern Michigan Railways.”

In 1924 the Detroit United Railway Company formed the People’s Motor Coach Company. Dr. D. B. Rushing, in his Bluehounds and Redhounds the History of Greyhound and Trailways, article Great Lakes Greyhound, writes: “The purpose of the new concern was to enable its parent firm, a railway business, to reduce its operating costs and expenses and to strengthen its competitive position against an increasing number of rivals operating buses on the developing and improving roads. . . . During the following years the [People’s Motor Coach Company] developed an extensive bus system, mostly by the acquisition of existing smaller companies, operating along both suburban and intercity routes.

In 1928 the Detroit United Railway Company was renamed Eastern Michigan Railways, and on September 17, 1928, the People’s Motor Coach Company was incorporated and renamed Eastern Michigan Motorbuses, Inc., and used the trade name “Blue Goose Lines“, along with the image of a blue goose, for all its intercity routes. In 1931 the Eastern Michigan Railways went into its second and final bankruptcy and reorganization. In 1936 the company bought out Great Lakes Motor Bus Company, which it then operated as a subsidiary. In 1941 The Greyhound Corporation bought out Great Lakes Motor Bus Company and renamed it  Great Lakes Greyhound Lines. (For more information, see Eastern Michigan Motorbuses, Inc. and Great Lakes Greyhound Lines.)

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DICKINSON MOTOR COACH LINES / L.D. DICKINSON MOTOR COACH LINES / L.D. DICKSON BUS LINES / DICKINSON BUS LINES was founded by Leonard D. Dickinson and was based in Owego, New York. The company can be found in records under all the above company names. This April 20, 1938, record revels the company’s origin: “Dickinson, L. D., Motor Coach Lines. No. MC-50199, Leonard D. Dickinson [doing business as L. D. Dickinson Motor Coach Lines] common carrier application; decided Apr. 20, 1938.” The company ran routes from Owego to Sayre, Pennsylvania, a distance of some 15 miles. It also served Elmira, New York, a distance of some 19 miles. It is mentioned in a newspaper article of June 10, 1937 as having been ordered by the Interstate Commerce Commission to cease picking up passengers between Sayre and Elmira. In 1956 the company was operating under the name Dickinson Motor Coach Lines and running 13 buses over 107 route miles serving Binghamton, Ithaca, Owego, Waverly, Endicott, Johnson City and Elmira. The November 11, 1959, edition of the Kingston Daily Freeman from Kingston, New York carried this story about the company’s demise: “The State Public Service Commission approved today the sale of the L. D. Dickinson Motor Coach Lines of Owego for $15,000 to the Capitol Bus, Co. Inc., of Harrisburg. Pa. The transaction, however, hinges on approval by the Interstate Commerce Commission of Dickinson turning over its interstate operating rights to Capitol for an additional $20,000. . . . The PSC said the Dickinson line had been operated since early this year by the estate of its founder. The heirs no longer want to stay in the business, the PSC said.”

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DILEO BUS LINE ran in Nassau Co., N.Y., was in business in 1952 and served Baldwin Harbor, Freeport, Merrick, Bellmore and Wantagh.

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DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA TRANSIT / D.C. TRANSIT In 1933 all Washington, D.C., streetcars were brought under one company, Capital Transit Company. The streetcars began to scale back with the rising popularity of the automobile and pressure to switch to buses. In 1956 Capital Transit Company, which was owned by Lewis E. Wolfson, had its franchise revoked by the U.S. Congress, was purchased on August 15, 1956, for $13.5 million by O. Roy Chalk, who renamed the company DC Transit System. Chalk had explicit instructions by Congress to switch to buses. The system was dismantled in the early 1960s and the last streetcar ran on January 28, 1962. In 1964 DC Transit bought out Alexandria, Barcroft and Washington Transit Company, although the company continued to operate under its own name–WV&M Coach Co.

On November 6, 1966 President Lyndon Johnson signed a bill creating the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA). The governors of Maryland and Virginia signed November 17 and the commissioners of the District of Columbia signed on November 22. On October 21, 1972, President Richard Nixon signed a bill authorizing WMATA to acquire the metropolitan area’s four privately owned bus companies. On January 14, 1973, WMATA purchased D.C. Transit, Inc. and WV&M Coach Co. (Washington, Virginia & Maryland Coach Company, Inc.) for $38.2 million. On February 4 WMATA purchased AB&W Transit Co. for $10.7 million and WMA Transit Co. (Washington Marlboro & Annapolis Transit Company) for $4.5 million, thereby creating Metrobus system. (It is worth noting that O. Roy Chalk rejected Metro’s offer of $32.2 million, but WMATA condemned the company and took full control of the 2,000-bus fleet at 2:01 a.m. on Sunday January 14, 1973, with the statement that a court would settle the purchase amount. In the end, the court approved the original offer of $32.2 million offered by WMATA.)

On January 15, 1973, the Associated Press reported: “[Metro] plans to sink $50 million into an improvement program designed to offer better service than its predecessors, which have been losing riders even as the community’s population doubled in 15 years. Metro has proclaimed ‘a promising new era,’ but for the present all the old routes and schedules will be maintained and fare will stay the same except for the 15-cent senior-citizens fare that will be extended from six to seven days a week and applied for the first time to WV&M routes. ‘Metrobus’ decals will be emblazoned on the sides of about 100 buses, and all vehicles will fly red, white, blue and black ‘Metro’ pennants; leaflets and posters will inform passengers of the public takeover — and ask for their patience.

The first badge for this company was made of brass and enamel with one threaded post and a pin post at the wing tip. It measures approx. 2½” x 1″. The second badge appears to be made of plastic and measures approx. 2″ x 3″.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member nisa1609.
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Photos used by permission of eBay member robertsoldantiques.
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Photo used by permission of eBay member jo-hildr.

DIVISION AVENUE BUS LINE, INC. The company’s founding dates to 1929, as noted in the January 11, 1929 edition of the Battle Creek Enquirer from Battle Creek, Michigan, when it applied for a franchise to run from Grand Rapids to Cutlerville. The company operated between Grand Rapids, Clyde Park, Godwin Heights, Home Acres and Cutlerville, Michigan. In 1946 it operated 12 buses over 18 route miles. In 1956 it ran 24 buses over 40 route miles. In April I960, City Coach Lines acquired the Division Avenue Bus Line.

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DIXIE COACH LINE was operating through northern Kentucky in the 1920s. In 1929 it was merged into the newly-formed Mason & Dixon Transit, Inc., which took over several other bus companies in southern Ohio and northern Kentucky. The company continued operating under its own name.

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DIXIE COACH LINES, INC. was incorporated on December 13, 1930, in Anniston, Alabama by Fred Bert Caudle (b. April 15, 1880 in Indiana). Caudle moved to Anniston in 1922 where he organized Dixie Stage Lines, which in its day became the largest bus company in Alabama. After selling Dixie Stage Lines to Avery Austin Crow on November 1, 1930, Caudle incorporated a new bus company, as noted in the December 4, 1930, edition of the Anniston Star from Anniston, Alabama: “The Dixie Coach Lines, Inc.. a sister company to the Dixie Stage Lines, Inc., has been formed here and papers of incorporation were filed in the Calhoun County Pro bate office Thursday. The capital stock of the new concern was placed at $115,000 with Fred B. Caudle, Mrs. Lottie Caudle and C. Z. Hicks as the incorporators. Mr. Caudle is president, Mrs. Caudle is vice president and Mr, Hicks is secretary-treasurer. The new concern will operate passenger and freight lines between Birmingham and Atlanta and intermediate points, while the Dixie Stage Lints, the older organization, will operate its lines to Montgomery, Gadsden, Huntsville and other points in Alabama.” It is interesting to note that a little over two months later the local paper was calling the new company by the old name: February 11, 1931, “O. M. Gruber today was performing his new duties as general manager of the Dixie Stage Lines, Inc.; to which he was promoted from auditor Tuesday. Mr. Gruber came to Anniston July in the employee of the Greyhound Lines, but soon became affiliated with the local concern which is headed by Fred B. Caudle. Mr. Gruber is a native of Washington and was a member of the class of 1917 at the United States Naval Academy. He served in the I World War and later went, to Atlanta, where he became connected with the Greyhound Lines as bus driver. He was promoted from time to time until he became assistant superintendent of transportation

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DIXIE MOTOR COACH CORPORATION / DIXIE SUNSHINE TRAILWAYS Alva Pearl Barrett incorporated Dixie Motor Coach Corporation in 1928 and operated between Dallas, Ft. Worth and Ardmore, Oklahoma; Dallas and Durant, Oklahoma; Dallas, Greenville and Texarkana; Wichita Falls and Texarkana. Since Barrett bought the company, we may assume it was an operating business prior to that year. (In 1928 Barrett also owned Texas Air Transport, Inc. and two Texas radio stations, KTAT in Fort Worth and KTSA in San Antonio.) He sold the corporation to Auble W. Ritter and brother Christopher C. Riter in 1933, who owned Sunshine Bus Lines, Inc. of Terrell, Texas. The brothers combined operations and moved to Dallas, Texas, since Dixie Motor Coach had a large shop already established there—about 35 miles away. (The two companies continued to be operated as separate lines.) Sunshine Bus Lines, Inc. and Dixie Motor Coach Corporation both joined Trailways in 1937 and remained in the association until 1945. In 1939 Auble Riter, Sr. sold his companies to Joseph P. Kittrell (1870-1950), who had acted as vice president of Sunshine Bus Lines, Inc. The Kittrell family sold out in 1945 and the new owners made application to merge the two corporations into one. Soon afterwards the ICC authorized Dixie Motor Coach Corporation to purchase the stock of Sunshine Bus Lines, Inc. and to change the name to Dixie-Sunshine Trailways. In 1946 Dixie Sunshine Trailways acquired Airline Motor Coaches Company, which during 1940’s was a Trailways member operating under name Airline Motor Trailways. In 1948 Dixie Motor Coach was sold to Transcontinental Bus System / Continental Trailways. (See Sunshine Trailways for more detailed information.) Three badges are shown below, the earlier one has two threaded posts and measures about 3″ in length. The second badge has two threaded posts and was made by WHITEHEAD – HOAG CO. NEWARK NEW JERSEY. (See the entry under “DMC” for an early badge that may have been issued by this company.)

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Photo used by permission of eBay member iconrelicsaz.
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Photo used by permission of eBay member iconrelicsaz.

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DIXIE MOTOR COACH LINE was operating in the mid 1920s in Charlotte, North Carolina. Guy J. Shields, president.

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DIXIE SAFETY COACH LINE, INC. According to David Steinburg’s history of Chattanooga, Tennessee, bus companies, Dixie Safety Coach Line, Inc. was founded in the 1920s by Captain Gordon Roper of Atlanta, Georgia. Advertised as the “Peach Belt Line”, the company originally ran between Atlanta, Macon and Griffin, Georgia. It would later add Chattanooga, Tennessee to its schedule. In 1928 the company was sold to the Motor Coach Corporation, which renamed the company Greyhound Lines of Georgia. (Motor Coach Corporation was renamed The Greyhound Corporation in 1929.) The Greyhound Corporation changed Greyhound Lines of Georgia’s name to the Southeastern Greyhound Lines in 1931 to reflect the company’s southern and eastern expansions. That same year the Consolidated Coach Corporation acquired Southeastern Greyhound Line and used it to acquire the Florida Greyhound Lines, which was originally called the Florida Motor Lines. Consolidated Coach Corporation continued to operated the company under the name “Southeastern Greyhound Lines.” (Indeed, Consolidated Coach Corp. used the name for all their buses, including the use of the Greyhound running dog logo, paint scheme and advertising. However, under the name “Southeastern Greyhound Lines” on their buses and advertising, they included “Consolidated Coach Corp.” in small letters.) In 1950 The Greyhound Corporation purchased 100% of Southeastern Greyhound Lines.

Dixie Safety Coach

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DIXIE STAGE LINES, INC. Fred Bert Caudle, who was born on April 15, 1880, in Indiana,  moved to Anniston, Alabama in 1922 . In 1928 in Anniston he organized Dixie Stage Lines, which in its day became the largest bus company in Alabama, running a route from Montgomery to Mobile, Alabama and from Montgomery to Meridian, Mississippi. On November 1, 1930 he sold the company to Avery Austin Crow, who had been a partner in the Alabama Bus Company of Birmingham. (That company was sold in 1929 to Teche Greyhound Lines.) Crow changed the name of the company to Capital Motor Lines: “On December 18, 1930 [Avery Crow] incorporated Capital Motor Lines with its principal office in Montgomery. By 1934, Capital Motor Lines had expanded service to three daily trips to Meridian, Mississippi and three round trips to Mobile with additional trips daily to Florala, Alabama (just north of the Florida-Alabama state line) and Pensacola, Florida. . . . By 1937, the Florence to Decatur line was extended to Huntsville, Alabama and Chattanooga, Tennessee. On May 1, 1938, Capital Motor Lines was accepted as a member of the recently formed National Trailways Bus System. This made it one of the early companies to join. Buses were then painted with the Trailways livery and operations were conducted under the name Capital Trailways.” (Information from the National Bus Trader / August, 2008 article “Capital Trailways and Colonial Trailways” NOTE: there are two sources on the Net that claim Dixie Stage Lines became Crescent Trailways. Neither have any source material for their claim, whereas the article cited here has been thoroughly researched.)

After selling Dixie Stage Lines to Avery Austin Crow on November 1, 1930, Fred B. Caudle incorporated a new bus company the following month:  Dixie Coach Lines, Inc.

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DIXIE TRACTION COMPANY In 1915, J. W. Bentler began operating a bus line to Erlanger, Ky., connecting with the Ft. Mitchell streetcar line. That line failed in 1918, but in 1922 Dixie Traction Co. began operating buses in that area. The company originally considered using trolleybuses, thus “Traction” in its name. Through service into Covington and Cincinnati began in 1925, competing with the CINCINNATI NEWPORT & COVINGTON RAILWAY streetcar line. In 1926 F. Walton Dempsey of Erlanger, Ky. and Congressman A. B. Rouse acquired the Dixie Traction Co. to provide public bus service between Erlanger and Elsmere and the streetcar end-of-the-line in Ft. Mitchell. According to a February 1, 1959, article in The Cincinnati Enquirer from Cincinnati, Ohio, the Cincinnati, Newport & Covington Railway acquired the Dixie Traction Company in 1939. “20 YEARS AGO In Cincinnati: A dispatch from Washington announced that the Interstate Commerce Commission had approved the Cincinnati, Newport and Covington Railway to acquire the Black Diamond Stages, Inc., Ft. Thomas, Ky., and the Dixie Traction Co., Erlanger Ky. The railway, popularly known as the Green Line operated streetcar and bus lines between Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky.” The Dixie Traction Company ran until 1955.

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DONNER LAKE-TRUCKEE AUTO STAGE LINE was operating in 1924 out of San Francisco, California. W.B. Gelatt was the owner.

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DORRIS STAGE & FREIGHT LINE was operating in 1924 out of Forest, California. R.D. Dorris was the owner/operator.

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DORSEY BUS COMPANY, INC. / DORSEY BUS, INC. This company had its start in the early-mid 1930s in Polk County, Oregon. The owners were Dean M. And Edna June Dorsey, who lived in Corvallis. (Dean Dorsey would go on to become the mayor of Corvallis.) Over the years Dorsey Bus Company was a charter bus service, a school bus service, an intercity bus service and a city bus service. The school bus routes included Dallas, Pedee and Perrydale, Oregon. In 1946 the company was operating 6 buses between Corvallis and Albany. After the cancellation of Albany Street Railway Company’s streetcar service in Albany, Oregon, in 1952, Dorsey Bus Company took over city service there. By 1957 the company was operating 12 buses over 235 route miles. In February 1981 Dorsey Bus Company operated a city bus service in Corvallis under a contract with the city’s Corvallis Transit System. By 1978 Murray Dorsey was the owner and general manager of the company. By the 2000s the Dorsey Bus Company operated a school bus service for Corvallis Transit System. The badge pictured below is made of metal with enamel and appears to date from the 1960s.

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Photo used by permission of eBay member jo-hildr.

DOS PALOS PASSENGER & FREIGHT LINE was operating in 1924 in Dos Palos, California; Carl S. Painter was the owner.

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DOTHAN BUS COMPANY ran in Dothan, Alabama in the 1940s and 1950s. There’s not much info on this company. Here’s one item from a March 2, 1947, newspaper article: “The Addition of Five New, Modern Buses The Dothan Bus Company is today is proud of its new fleet, and, we think, justly so, because it means to us another step towards a goal we set for ourselves the day we began operations—as good bus service for the people of Dothan as could be gotten anywhere in the world. It has not been easy to locate this new equipment, nor to get delivery in this day of shortages, but we are happy to say that our new busses are here, and in operation for the people of Dothan. We sincerely hope our patrons will find increased comfort, safety, and efficiency as a result of their modern construction and design. Now, may we take this opportunity to thank the people for their patronage and ask their cooperation towards greater strides. Andrew M. Enfinger, Mgr., Dothan Bus Co.

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DOUGLAS STREET RAILWAY COMPANY ran between Douglas, Arizona, and the Copper Queen Smelter and Douglas and the Calumet, Arizona. It was incorporated on October 11, 1902, and ran until 1920, when it effectively shut down.

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DOWNIEVILLE STAGE COMPANY was operating in 1924 in Downieville, California. M.P. Fischer was the registered contact.

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DOYLESTOWN & EASTON MOTORCOACH COMPANY This history of this company is tied to the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The March 3 1928, issue of the Electric Railway Journal carried this notice: “The Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company, Philadelphia, Pa., has agreed to pay $1,825,000 for the Quaker Cab Company and three suburban bus lines. This was disclosed in a petition filed by the railway with the Public Service Commission for approval of the purchase of the four carriers. The proposed deal includes the purchase of 5,000 shares of the outstanding stock in the Quaker City Cabs, Inc.; 4,510 shares of the Montgomery Bus Company, Inc.; 1,000 shares of the Philadelphia Suburban Transit Company, and 200 shares of the Doylestown & Easton Motorcoach.” The company was still operating in 1938 when it won 2 National Safety Council awards.

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DRUID CITY TRANSIT, INC. was a privately-owned public transit operator that ran buses in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, between 1947 and 1964. It succeeded Alabama Power Company, which had operated both streetcars and buses and had taken over service from Tuscaloosa Railway & Utilities Co. in 1923. Controlled by the American Transit Corporation, the Druid City Transit ran 22 buses over 106 route miles. The company’s end came about during the Civil Rights Movement, specifically when Druid City Transit management refused to hire black drivers, although their ridership was estimated to be about 90% black and the company had an integration policy. As a result, on August 1, 1964 the Tuscaloosa Citizens for Action committee (TCAC) announced that the black community would boycott the bus line. (Known as the Druid City Bus Boycotts of 1964.) The TCAC sustained people’s morale by organizing a system of “courtesy cars,” which helped riders sustain the boycott. After only three days of empty buses, the management laid off over twenty employees. Although the bus company management then considered hiring black applicants, the Amalgamated Transit Union, representing the interests of the bus line’s drivers, refused to cooperate. Union officials argued that no white driver could be fired without a valid reason. With financial ruin looming, and no prospect of resolving the impasse with the union, on November 10, 1964, the Druid City Transit, Inc. surrendered its franchise to the Tuscaloosa City Commission. On 12 April 1965 the new Tuscaloosa Transit Company resumed bus services with an integrated work force and a public policy of nondiscrimination.

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DUCOR-CALIFORNIA HOT SPRINGS STAGE LINE was running in 1911 as a horse-drawn line serving Porterville / Kern River, California. In 1921 F. A. Minaker was listed as the owner; by 1924 the company was motorized and was serving Ducor, Hot Springs and Porterville / Kern River, California.

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DUKE POWER COMPANY In 1913 Southern Power (which became Duke Power in 1924) organized a new subsidiary, Southern Public Utilities Company, to operate streetcar systems . . . By 1930 Duke Power owned the streetcar systems in Winston-Salem, Greensboro, High Point, and Salisbury. The Charlotte system expanded to serve several new outlying neighborhoods and reached a total of twenty-nine miles of trackage (ten of them double tracks) utilizing fifty passenger cars.” Duke Power ran streetcars and buses in Charlotte, North Carolina from 1935 until 1955 when CHARLOTTE CITY COACH LINES, Inc. took over service. (See a DEVELOPMENT OF STREETCAR SYSTEMS IN NORTH CAROLINA for more info.)

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DULUTH SUPERIOR TRANSIT CO. In September 1933 all of the properties of the Duluth Street Railway Company were transferred to the Duluth Superior Transit Company, which was incorporated in January 1933. The transit system’s mixed fleet in 1933 consisted of 110 streetcars, two electric trolley buses and nine gasoline-powered buses. During the 1930’s, all of the streetcars in the system were replaced by buses. Streetcars stopped operating in Superior, Wisconsin, in 1935. An act of the Minnesota State Legislature created the Duluth Transit Authority (DTA) in 1969. The badge is made of celluloid with a pin back and measures 2.125″ x 1.625″.

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Photo courtesy of kygelberhund.

Dundalk Bus Lines (MD) 1959


DUNGENESS LINE See Olympic Bus Lines.


DUNLAP-PIKEVILLE BUS LINE was operating in the late 1920s out of Dunlap, Tennessee. The route ran between Dunlap and Pikeville.

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DUNHAM AUTO STAGE was operating in 1924 out of Santa Rosa, California. A. Dunham was the owner/operator.

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DUNSMUIR-SISSON WEED STAGE LINE was operating in Dunsmuir, California, in 1924. G.L. Morrison was the registered contact.

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DUNTHORPE MOTOR TRANSPORT, INC. To start, there appears to be (at different times in history) two different Dunthorpe Motor Transport companies. The first is noted in a  October 22, 1929, article in The News-Review from Roseburg, Oregon: “Dunthorpe Motor Transport company, which has been operating stage lines between Portland and Sandy via Gresham, purchased by Geo. T Lewis & Son corporation.”

The second company with this name is outlined in a letter from Evergreen Stage Line Tours to the City of Portland, Oregon, License Department dated Aug. 29, 1986: “In 1946 Vernon Trigg, President of Evergreen Stage Lines, started his first transit operation in the Portland Metropolitan Area. This transit system served as a feeder system to the downtown area. The system served a very affluent area, and the company took the name of the development and became known as Dunthorpe Motor Transit, Inc. The initial operation saw Vernon Trigg work as bus driver, manager, as well as a personal, friend to many of the families of the area. From this humble beginning Mr. Trigg acquired Vancouver, Washington based Evergreen Stage Lines. This line provided passenger service between Yacolt, Amboy, Battleground, Washougal, Camas, and Vancouver, Washington to the Portland area. . . . This operation is still being provided under contract to C-Tran, also known as Clark County Public Transportation Benefit Area Authority.bFrom a couple of buses the system grew to over 100 vehicles. As time progressed Mr. Trigg acquired The Gray Line Franchise, successfully operating it for the past ten years. In 1984 Mr. Trigg, along with two other operators purchased Pacific Trailways. . . . Evergreen is an individually owned and operated firm with forty years of operating experience in scheduled bus operation, both inter-city and intra-city. Additionally Evergreen is the parent company of the North Bend Bus Co. and The Gray Line of Portland.” In the 1970s Dunthorpe Motor Transport also was under contract to transport school children in the Portland area. The badge has one threaded post, was made by HOOKFAST PROVIDENCE R.I. (marked on thumb nuts) and measures 2 ½” x 2″.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member 007modern.

DUQUESNE MOTOR COACH CO.  was another bus company that was preceded by a rail operation. The Duquesne and Dravosburg Street Railway (D&DSRCo) existed from 1908 until 1928. Bus service was started by the Ziegler family but was shortly sold to James Duncan and Rudolph Schreiber who formed Duquesne Motor Coach in 1929. It ran in a suburb in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The badge is a single threaded post.

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DURHAM-DUNN BUS COMPANY was operating out of Fuquay Springs, North Carolina, in the 1940s. It was owned by Stacey W. and Lewis M. Wade. It ran from Dunn over N. C. Highway 55, via Erwin, Coats, Angier, Fuquay Springs, Varina, and Apex, to the intersection of Highway 55 with U. S. Highway 64; thence over an unnumbered county road, via Carpenter and Lowes Grove to Durham and return.

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BUS COMPANIES BEGINNING WITH THE LETTER “E” 


EAGLE BUS LINE was running in the Cincinnati, Ohio, area in the late 1920s.

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EAGLE BUS LINE, INC. ran from Kingston to Ellenville, New Jersey, in the 1940s-1950s. In 1954 it was running 8 buses over 30 miles, J. Van Kleeck was the company’s president. According to one source it operated until 1956; however, there is mention of the company in the Kingston Daily Freeman for February 5, 1970, which was the sale of Lipton’s Bee Line, of Kingston, to Eagle Bus Line, Inc. of Ellenville.

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EAGLE MOTOR COACH LINE was running in Peoria, Illinois, in the 1920s and as late as 1936. In the 1920s it was involved in a dispute with BARTONVILLE BUS LINE before the Illinois Public Utilities Commission. No further information.

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EAGLE MOTOR LINES, INC. was founded in September 1927 in Roanoke, Virginia. The September 30, 1927, edition of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle from Brooklyn, New York carried the story: “EIGHT NEW BUS LINES Steady growth In the use of the motor bus, especially on the part of the railroads, is indicated in reports received from all sections of the country, according to Bus Transportation. During the month of September eight bus operating companies were incorporated in the United States. These are the Texas Motor Coaches, Inc., Dallas; the Journal Square-Clifton Transit Company, of Jersey City, N. J.; Huntington Coach Corporation, Huntington, N. Y.; Twin Cities Transportation Company, Albany, N. Y.; Rome Transit Company, Kingston, N. Y.; Ferguson-Wellston Bus Company, Ferguson, Mo.; Eagle Motor Lines, Roanoke, Va., and West Coast Motor Buses, Everglades, Fla.” Apparently the company went out of business in January 1929, as noted in the January 5, 1929, edition of The Bee from Danville, Virginia: “Jan. 5.–(AP)–The Eagle Motor lines, Inc., was authorized by the Virginia State Corporation Commission yesterday to transfer its passenger bus certificate for service between Danville and Rocky-Mount by way of Callands and Whitmell to the Camel City Coach Company, Inc.

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EAGLE ROCK AUTO EXPRESS was operating in the mid 1920s out of Eagle Rock, Los Angeles, California. George A. Thompson was the owner.

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EAGLEVILLE-CEDARVILLE AUTO LINE was operating in 1924 in Eagleville, California (Surprise Valley). L.S. Tripp was the registered contact.

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EAST AVENUE BUS COMPANY was owned by the New York State Railways, which also controlled the Darling Bus Line and the Rochester Interurban Bus Company. The company ran in the 1920s between Pittsford, New York, and Rochester, New York. It was still running in 1928.

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EAST MONTEREY BUS LINE / EAST MONTEREY SPANISH LINE was founded by Bryant Guernsey in 1932 to provide transportation to the community of Seaside and to the Ord Terrace Gate of Camp Gigling (later Fort Ord), California. It was a “one-man” operation that “ran on a somewhat random basis.” In July 1943 the owner appeared in court, one of several such appearances over the years: “Bryant Guernsey, owner and operator of the East Monterey bus line, was fined $100 several days ago for failure to appear in court at a set time, and for driving an “unsafe bus” which had been ordered off the road three times; Judge Ray Baugh said Guernsey has been issued numerous citations by the California highway patrol and warned time and again to make repairs on his bus which Baugh described a ‘danger to the passengers who ride it’.” In 1946 the company was running 4 buses over 11 miles and served Del Monte Heights, Monterey, Fort Ord Village and the U.S. Naval Air Base.

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EAST ST. LOUIS CITY LINE, INC. was part of National City Lines, and operated buses in East St. Louis, Illinois, making connections to St. Louis, Missouri. It succeeded Blue Goose Motor Coach Company in 1935, which had ran only one year (1935-1936). (Blue Goose Motor Coach Co. has succeeded East St. Louis Railway Company, 1902-1935.) The company went out of business in 1963.

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EAST SIDE OMNIBUS CORPORATION was a bus company in the borough of Manhattan, New York City. It was formed in 1932 to operate former streetcar routes operated by the Second Avenue Railroad in Manhattan. One year later, the same people formed Comprehensive Omnibus Corporation. Comprehensive and East Side Omnibus were coordinated in their transfer policy with New York City Omnibus Co., all three companies exchanging transfers among their routes, even though Comprehensive and East Side were entirely independent in ownership from NYCO. Both Comprehensive and East Side went bankrupt in 1948, and their routes were taken over by New York City, operated by the Board of Transportation (which later became a State operation, the New York City Transit Authority). There are two types of badges for this company: the earlier one is solid brass, and the later one is nickel plated with enamel. Both have two threaded posts.

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Photo courtesy of Brian Peltier, eBay member garage-sales-hack.

EAST TEXAS MOTOR COACHES was a fairly short local bus line running along Highway 190 and serving the East Texas cities of Huntsville, Livingston, and Jasper, and De Ridder, Louisiana, during the 1940s– 1950. Measures 2⅛” x 2″ and has a single threaded post. Made by FIFTH AVENUE UNIFORM COMPANY 19 SO. WELLS CHICAGO.

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EASTERN CAROLINA COACH COMPANY, INC. was operating in the mid 1920s out of Charlotte, North Carolina. Authorized Operation: Charlotte to Wilmington via Monroe, Wadesboro, Rockingham, Hamlet, Laurinburg, Lumberton, Chadbourn and Whiteville, Highway No. 20; Lumberton to Fayetteville via St. Pauls, Highway No. 22.

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EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS STREET RAILWAY COMPANY / EASTERN MASS / EM was a streetcar and later bus company in eastern Massachusetts that succeeded Bay State Street Railway in 1919. In 1946 it was running 808 buses over 861 route miles, was operating in Boston and 19 other cities and 51 towns; the company was operated by the Board of Public Trustees. EM was acquired by Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority in 1968. The first style badge measures 2¼ ” x 2¾ with two threaded posts and is marked Pilgrim Badge Co. Boston along with a number, which differs with each badge. (We may presume this is the employee I.D. number.) Later issues were redesigned and are 2½” tall and have two threaded posts.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member rtoygarage.

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EASTERN MICHIGAN MOTORBUSES, INC. “a.k.a. BLUE GOOSE LINES” This is another bus company that prominently figures in the Greyhound Lines‘ pedigree. In 1924 the Detroit United Railway Company (DURC), which was an electric interurban rail line, formed the People’s Motor Coach Company. Dr. D. B. Rushing, in his Bluehounds and Redhounds the History of Greyhound and Trailways, article Great Lakes Greyhound, writes: “The purpose of the new concern was to enable its parent firm, a railway business, to reduce its operating costs and expenses and to strengthen its competitive position against an increasing number of rivals operating buses on the developing and improving roads. . . . During the following years the PMC Company developed an extensive bus system, mostly by the acquisition of existing smaller companies, operating along both suburban and intercity routes.” The companies absorbed by PMC were the Trackless Coach and Blue Goose Lines, operating between Detroit, Michigan, and Toledo, Ohio; Highway Motor Bus, operating between Detroit, Lansing and Jackson and also between Detroit and Grand Rapids, Michigan; White Star Motor Bus Co., operating between Detroit and Port Huron, Detroit and Flint, Michigan; The Wolverine (Motor Coach Service), between Detroit and Mt. Clemens and between Detroit and Imlay City. As to the People Motor Coach Co., it operated between Detroit and Wyandotte and City Service in Flint, Port Huron and Pontiac, Michigan.

In 1928 the DURC was renamed Eastern Michigan Railways, and on September 17, 1928, the People’s Motor Coach Company was incorporated and renamed Eastern Michigan Motorbuses, Inc., and used the trade name “Blue Goose Lines“, along with the image of a blue goose, for all its intercity routes.

In 1931 the Eastern Michigan Railways went into its second and final bankruptcy and reorganization. In 1936 the company bought out Great Lakes Motor Bus Company, which it then operated as a subsidiary.

Dr. D. B. Rushing writes: “[In] 1938 The Greyhound Corporation, the umbrella Greyhound firm, bought a controlling (majority) interest in the Eastern Michigan Motorbuses under the supervision of the receivers and the court in bankruptcy. However, the federal Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) did not at first allow Greyhound to control the EMM or to merge it into Greyhound, not until 1941, after a change in the membership (the commissioners) of the ICC. Because of the large size of the Eastern Michigan Motorbuses, its route network, and its operations, The Greyhound Corporation created a new subsidiary, named as the Great Lakes Greyhound Lines, which in 1941 took over the EMM. Thus began the Great Lakes Greyhound Lines.

The August 18, 1939, edition of the Times Herald from Port Huron, Michigan, reported: “AP The interstate commerce commission denied authority for Greyhound corporation Thursday to acquire control of Eastern Michigan Motorbusses and its subsidiary, Great Lakes Motor Bus company. The Greyhound corporation proposed to issue 145,000 shares of common stock in exchange for the stock of Eastern Michigan Motorbusses. While denying the Greyhound application, the commission approved a request by Eastern Michigan Motorbusses to absorb Great Lakes Motor Bus company entirely. The commission said its primary concern was whether, after the proposed acquisition by Greyhound, there would remain effective an adequate competition to insure the public the maintenance of high standards of service and reasonable charges. It said there is a close relationship existing between certain Greyhound’s subsidiaries and certain railroads, adding: ‘The effect of acquisition would be to add a fourth Greyhound-controlled bus line operating between Detroit and Toledo, and a second line providing service between Detroit and Kalamazoo, with no organized competition over the latter route between Detroit and Battle Creek, other than one railroad which owns a substantial interest in Central Greyhound. We can conceive of no substantial advantages not presently available, which would acquire to the public under this acquisition. Satisfactory operation and management of Eastern Michigan motorbusses and its subsidiary Great Lakes are indicated by their respective records of earnings, and we, therefore, entertain no apprehension that disapproval of the application would involve any impairment of the earning capacity or ability of the mentioned carriers to provide efficient service in the future.

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EASTERN PUBLIC SERVICE CORPORATION was incorporated in Delaware on January 29, 1926, to operate public transit. Operating as an intercity company in the Washington, D.C. / Virginia area, the company both ran its own buses and owned subsidiaries, such as Indiana Safety Coach Corporation, Towns Bus Lines, Inc., Washington—Shenandoah Valley Motor Lines, Inc., Crush Bus Lines, Inc. and Virginia Motor Lines, Inc. In 1929 the Eastern Public Service Corporation ran a route through Pulaski and Radford, Virginia. By 1931 the corporation had changed its name to United Utilities, Inc., which seems to be tied to a curious circumstance.

The August 28, 1931, edition of the Alexandria Times-Tribune from Alexandria, Indiana reported the demise of the Indiana Safety Coach Corporation: “Four bus line franchises and other assets of the Indiana Safety Coach Corporation were sold to the Eastern Public Service Corporation for $20,000 with approval of Judge Oren W. Dickey In the Grant superior court at Marlon. The sale was transacted by the First National Bank as receiver for the corporation . . . Bus franchises from Muncle to Peru, Marlon to Warsaw and Port Wayne to Indianapolis were among the assets which brought a price $5,000 in excess of the appraised value. The Marlon to Hartford City franchise will be sold later. Before the sale is final, approval must be given by the Indiana public service commission.

The above newspaper article raises a question since the Eastern Public Service Corporation already owned and operated this company as a subsidiary, which is noted in this April 30, 1928 Indianapolis advert: “ALL-STEEL PARLOR COACHES EQUIPPED WITH BALLOON TIRES AND AIR BRAKES $3.60 ONE WAY $6.50 ROUND TRIP TO FT. WAYNE LEAVE UNION BUS STATION 125 W. Market Riley 2235 INDIANA SAFETY COACH CORP. Subsidiary Eastern Public Service Corp.”  Perhaps the bankruptcy of the Indiana Safety Coach Corp., coupled with the 1929 stock market crash, ties into the reason Eastern Public Service Corp. changed its name to United Utilities, Inc. by the end of 1931.

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EASTERN TRAILS, INC. / EASTERN TRAILWAYS One source says the company was formed in 1937, joined National Trailways Bus System in 1939, and was sold to American Bus Lines, Inc. in 1946. In turn, this company was sold to Transcontinental Bus System in 1953. Jon Hobijn notes that transportation tycoon Aaron Greenleaf owned 91% of Eastern Trails. In 1946 Eastern Trailways / Eastern Trails, Inc. operated out of New York City, and Aaron Greenleaf was the president. In August 1947 American Bus Lines, Inc. announced a consolidation of 19 bus companies: American Bus Lines, Inc., Burlington Trailways, Continental Trailways, Crescent Trailways, Dixie-Sunshine Trailways, Denver-Colorado Springs-Pueblo Trailways, Denver-Salt Lake-Pacific Trailways, Eastern Trailways, Georgia Trailways, Indiana Railroad, Mo-Ark Trailways, Modern Trailways, Mucatine-Davenport and Clinton Bus Company, Pony Express, Service Stages, Southeastern Greyhound Lines, Santa Fe Trailways, Utah-Idaho Central Railroad and West Coast Trailways.

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EASTERN TRANSIT LINE, INC. of Weehawken, New Jersey, was incorporated in May 1917 to operate a passenger and freight line.

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Eau Claire Transportation Company (WI) 1959


EBERLY BUS SERVICE was founded by Maynard E. Eberly and was basically a two man operation, the other man being John Gillengerten. It is listed in the 1946 edition of the MTD as operating from Okemos, Michigan. It  The company operated 3 buses over 27 route miles in 1954; it is not listed in the 1956 edition of the MTD, so one might assume it had ceased operations by that date. (One source notes that the company was possibly acquired by Lansing Suburban Lines, which was later renamed as Lansing Metro Lines after also acquiring city transit operations in Lansing.)

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EDDY MOTOR BUS COMPANY was founded by Osborn Eddy in LaSalle, Illinois, prior to January 1914. It was noted in a case brought before the Illinois Commerce Commission on January 31, 1922, that during this time the company had been operating without the required certificate of convenience and necessity. The details of that hearing are rather interesting as they give a glimpse into the cut-throat behavior of independent jitney operators in the early days of bus service:  “A hearing was held upon said complaint at the office of the Commission in Springfield, Illinois on January 31, 1922, at which hearing both the Wagner & Himbert Bus Lines, Incorporated, and the Eddy Motor Bus Company, and Osborn Eddy, were represented by counsel. The evidence taken at said hearing discloses the fact that the Eddy Motor Bus Company is operating three buses between the cities of LaSalle and Oglesby, Illinois, making regular trips and holding itself out to the public to furnish a regular scheduled service between the above mentioned points . . . The evidence further discloses that the complainant, the Wagner & Himbert Bus Lines, Incorporated, is a public utility, duly incorporated under the laws of the state of Illinois, and authorized by certificates of convenience and necessity, issued by this Commission . . . to operate a motor bus line for the transportation of passengers between the cities of LaSalle and Oglesby, Illinois . . . The evidence further discloses that it is the practice of the respondent, the Eddy Motor Bus Company, to operate its busses just ahead of the schedule of the complainant, the Wagner & Himbert Bus Lines, thereby taking advantage of the fact that the said Wagner & Himbert Bu Line is required to operate upon P.U.R.1922B, to gain an advantage over the said company and the passengers along the route who are waiting for the busses of the complainant company. It is also resorted to parking its busses in front of the waiting rooms maintained by the complainant company in the city of LaSalle, thereby effectually preventing the said complainant from stopping in front of its own waiting room to take on and discharge passengers, and that the said Eddy Motor Bus Company has resorted to various other practices designed to secure the business of the complainants and taking advantage of the fact that the complainant herein is a regulated utility and as such must operating in accordance with the rules and provisions of this Commission. . . . [the] Eddy Motor Bus Company has resorted to various other practices designed to secure the business of the complainants . . .” The ruling of the Commission was “That the said Eddy Motor Bus Company and Osborn Eddy should discontinue said business and cease operating as a public utility in the state of Illinois, until such time as they have obtained a certificate of convenience and necessity from this Commission authorizing them to conduct such a business.

By April 1922 the Eddy Motor Bus Company had applied for the necessary permits “to operate a motor bus line between Oglesby, LaSalle, Peru and State Park at Starved Rock in LaSalle county.” The permit was granted by August 1922. In a strange twist, the May 4, 1923, edition of the Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois noted that the Eddy Motor Bus Company was complaining to the Commission about another bus company doing what they had done the previous year: “Complaint that Louis Johnson and others are operating a motor bus service between La Salle and Oglesby without having first obtaining a state certificate, was made to the Illinois Commerce Commission today by the Eddy Motor Bus Company of Oglesby.” There is no record of this company after the above dates.

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EDGERTON BUS LINES, INC. was operating in the mid 1920s out of Suffolk, Virginia. It ran from Edenton, N. C., to Virginia-North Carolina State Line, destination Suffolk, Va., Highways Nos. 32 and 30.

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EDGERTON REO BUS LINE, INC. was operating in the mid 1920s out of Suffolk, Virginia.

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EDMONTON TRANSIT / EDMONTON TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM / EDMONTON TRANSIT SYSTEM / EDMONTON TRANSIT SERVICE / EDMONTON RADIAL RAILWAY Edmonton Radial Railway (October 30, 1908 – 16 July 16, 1946) was authorized in 1908 to operate tramways in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, and for 80 miles (128 km) in any direction. (This was never accomplished.) On August 26, 1908, the company acquired the Strathcona Radial Tramway Company Limited (incorporated October 8, 1904), which held, from September 30, 1907, an exclusive franchise to operate tramways in the City of Strathcona. In addition to the cities of Edmonton and Strathcona, service was also extended to the villages of North Edmonton and Calder. In 1946 the company name was changed to Edmonton Transportation System (July 16, 1946 – April 29, 1947). On April 29, 1947, the name was again changed  to Edmonton Transit System (April 29, 1947 – November 14, 2016)

Edmonton Transit System took over transit service in the Town of Beverly in 1961, and in the Town of Jasper Place in 1964. In 1977 the name was altered to Edmonton Transit but “Edmonton Transit System” began appearing on buses again in 1993. Formal name change from Edmonton Transit System to Edmonton Transit Service arose from organizational changes announced November 14, 2016. (Information from David A. Wyatt’s All-Time List of Canadian Transit Systems.) The below inspector’s badge has a single threaded post and measures 2½” x 1⅞”.

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Photos courtesy of Ed Heilman.

EDWARD BROS. STAGE LINE was running a 72-mile route between Portland and Astoria, Oregon, in 1923.

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EDWARDS LAKES TO SEA STAGES / EDWARDS TRANSIT COMPANY, INC. was founded in 1918 in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, with F. J. Edwards serving as secretary and treasurer. In 1939 served New York, Easton, Bethlehem, Allentown, Pottsville, Sunbury, Williamsport, Oil City, Youngstown, Cleveland, Detroit and Chicago. The company is not mentioned in the 1940s editions of the MTD.

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EGYPTIAN TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM, INC. / EGYPTIAN TRANSPORTATION COMPANY began bus operations in in 1920 in Southern Illinois. By 1930 it was headquartered in Marion, Illinois, and was operating a route between Marion and St. Louis. In July 1930 the company entered into receivership because of outstanding debts. At that time Allen W. Haggerty, the company’s former manager, was appointed receiver. In 1934, Egyptian Transportation System was sold to Dixie Greyhound Lines.

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EISENMAN INC. ROYAL TOURS was a company based in Port Hadlock, Washington, that ran tours and charter service in Northwest Washington and Victoria, B.C. in 2006. The badge has one threaded post and one pin post.

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EL DORADO STAGE COMPANY, INC. was operating a bus route between Los Angeles, Bakersfield and Taft, California, in the mid 1910s. A tire ad in the May 5, 1918, Oakland Tribune from Oakland, California, reads: “W. Mims, general manager of the El Dorado Stage Line, which operates a Packard twin six deluxe service. We have tried out six makes of tires on sixteen El Dorado stages operated between Los Angeles and Bakersfield.” The number of buses mentioned in the ad shows this was not the usual one or two man operation of the time. In fact, when the company was sold to Oliver R. Fuller in 1920, it sold for $105,000—a large sum of money in those days: “California Railroad Commission Decisions: Harry A. Eucell and H.W. Kidd for applicant; October 6, 1920 El Dorado Stage Company, operating an automobile passenger service between Los Angeles and Bakersfield and Taft, authorized to transfer its operative right and equipment to the Motor Transit Company, for one hundred five thousand dollars par value of its common stock in exchange thereof.” It’s worth noting that the run from Bakersfield to Los Angeles was not exactly a safe one, as this excerpt shows: “About one year later, O.R. Fuller acquired the El Dorado Stage Line, which connected Los Angeles and Bakersfield. The buses traveled over the Ridge Route, forty-eight miles of steep grades and hairpin turns. Running time between the two cities was about ten hours.” El Dorado Stage Line was absorbed into Fuller’s Motor Transit Company.

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EL SEGUNDO TRANSIT COMPANY was operating out of Anaheim, California, in 1924.

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ELGIN CITY LINES succeeded Aurora-Elgin City Lines in 1940 offering service in Aurora and Elgin, Illinois. However, both companies were owned by National City Lines, which started service in 1936, having acquired bus operations from Aurora Elgin and Fox River Electric Company, which ran streetcars and buses from 1924 until 1936. In 1966 National City sold Elgin City Lines to Vernon Westover, who was a regional manager of National City Lines and who retained the name. In 1968 the city-owned Elgin Department of Transportation took over and ran the operation until 1991.

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ELK CREEK-ALDER SPRINGS AUTO LINE was operating out of Elk Creek, California, in 1924. J.F. Bickford was owner/operator.

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ELKIN-ALLEGHANY BUS LINE, INC. was operating in the mid 1920s out of Elkin, North Carolina. It ran between Winston-Salem to Sparta via Yadkinville, Brooks Cross Roads and Elkin, Highways Nos. 60 and 26.

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Elliott Bus Corporation (NJ) 1959


ELMIRA-ITHACA MOTOR TRANSPORTATION COMPANY, INC. This company was around in 1918 and was first owned by Frank F. Gillett. Before June 1919 he assigned his certificate of public convenience to John L. Hicks. At some point a man named W. M. Hicks was the general manager. The company ran as an intercity bus route from Elmira to Ithaca, New York. One source says the route was taken over by Central Greyhound Lines in 1948. It is listed in the Russell’s Guide for 1939, but not listed in the 1946 MTD.

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ELMIRA MOTOR COACH CORPORATION The Atwood-Coffee Catalogue relates: “The Elmira Water, Light & Railroad Company was a merger of earlier companies in 1900, and on April 27, 1932, the name was changed to Elmira Light, Heat & Power Corp. which, on November 30, 1936, was merged into the New York State Electric & Gas Corporation. Streetcars were abandoned in Elmira March 11, 1939, but N.Y.S.E. & G. Continued with buses until 1948, when Elmira Motor Coach Corporation took over.” In 1954 the company served Elmira, New York, and vicinity. It was controlled by Management Controls, Inc. It ran 18 buses over 64 route miles. The president was W. Farber Baum. The company ceased operations in 1955 and was succeeded by Rochester Penfield Bus Co. Inc. The badge has two threaded posts, is made of metal and enamel by Hookfast, Providence, R.I.

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Photos courtesy of the Steve Adydan collection.

ELMIRA-TROY-CANTON BUS LINE / ELMIRA-TROY-CANTON AUTO-BUS LINE Owner Harold l. Wells started running a parlor coach on July 25, 1928. There were two round trips week days and one round trip Sunday. The bus left Elmira at 7:00 A.M. and arrived in Canton at 8:25 A.M. leaving Canton at 8:30 A.M. It arrived back in Elmira at 10:00 A.M. For the afternoon run, it left Elmira at 3:00 P.M. arriving in Canton at 4:25 P.M., then left Canton at 4:30 P.M. and arrived in Elmira at 6:00 P.M. It was still operating in 1955 when it announced a schedule change, and according to one source ceased operations in 1974. The badge is metal and  has two threaded posts.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member pool9.

ELMIRA-WATKINS GLEN TRANSIT CORPORATION was an intercity bus line serving Elmira, Montour Falls, Watkins Glen, Dundee, Penn Yan, Ithaca and Geneva, New York. In 1946 it was located in Watkin Glen and operated 12 buses over 124 route miles. In 1956 it was located in Burdett, New York, and operated 9 buses over 63 route miles. The company was still running in 1974. One source says that the company was in business until 1977.

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EMERGENCY TRANSPORTATION, INC. When America entered World War II the nation’s defense industry kicked into full production. Tens of thousands of aircraft workers were employed throughout Kansas building planes, and most of those jobs were centered in Wichita, Kansas. Boeing built the B-29 bombers. Beech Aircraft Company and Cessna Aircraft Company built various military aircraft models. All those workers needed transportation, and the easiest mode was buses. In 1933 Wichita Transportation Company had taken over public transportation after Wichita Railroad & Light Company discontinued streetcar operations. When America entered World War II, the company the company formed Emergency Transportation, Inc. to run buses from downtown Wichita to the three aircraft production plants. Their service began on July 20, 1942. That same month the City of Wichita City commission granted a franchise to the
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By December 1945 the Wichita Transportation Company, along with Emergency Transportation, Inc., was operating 126 buses and carried 30 million passengers, while the Defense Transportation Company, operating 14 buses, carried 3 million passengers. By April 1947 Emergency Transportation Inc. was still operating, but the Defense Transportation Company seems to have been shut down. Indeed, in September 1945 the company was advertising in local newspapers to sell off “at 25 per cent or more below ceiling prices, a number of 1939, 1940 and 1942 Ford, Chevrolet and Dodge Trucks and buses.” Their address was given as 309 N. Market St., Wichita, Kansas.

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EMERY’S MOTOR COACH LINES / EMERY MOTOR COACH LINES, INC. /  METROPOLITAN TRAILWAYS The company was founded by Robert L. Emery, Jr. in Martinsburg, West Virginia. I don’t know the date of the company’s founding, but certainly it was flourishing in the 1940s. At some point in the late 1940s the company had joined the National Trailways Bus System as Metropolitan Trailways. By 1949 the company was in deep financial trouble. In October 1949 the Mellon National Bank & Trust Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania foreclosed. On Friday, October 28, 1949 at 10 a.m., the bank forced a public sale at the door of the Berkley County, West Virginia courthouse. Everything was for sale: “Together with all rights, franchise permits, certificates of public conveyance and good-will owned by the said Robert L. Emery, Jr., an individual doing business as Emery’s Motor Coach Lines and Emery’s Motor Coach Lines, Inc. a Corporation.” The sale listed 30 buses, the oldest being a 1935 Yellow Coach and the most recent being Fexible coaches from the 1940, including two 1948 coaches. The details of the sale were revealed in a November 21, 1949, Hagerstown, Maryland newspaper article, which reported that Francis H. Urner, an official of the Potomac Coach Lines, Inc., Jack A. Bowers, the president of the company, Fred Lillard, the manager and Paul Smith, supervisor, acknowledged that the “new company” was having financial difficulties. The article also revealed that Robert L. Emery had been given a 30-day option to repurchase his bus line at the same price Potomac Coach Lines paid Mellon National Bank, which was $20,000 cash. Apparently Potomac Coach Lines was a new company, founded in 1949 at the purchase of Emery’s bus line. My guess is that Emery never exercised his option to repurchase, since in December 1951 he sued Mellon National Bank and Trust Company for money, he claimed, the company failed to pay him after the sale of his business.

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EMPIRE BUS LINE was incorporated in Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 1956 by Willis “Bill” Meyer (1931-2007). In 1972 the company was running 11 buses on intercity routes. The company ceased operations in 1981. One of the company’s drivers was William Edward Joling (1937-2009). After his employment with Empire Bus Line, Mr. Joling drove for Greyhound Lines, retiring with over 35 years of service.

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EMPIRE BUS LINES, INC. In 1956 Charles C. Mucci was the president and general manager. The company is not listed in the 1947 edition nor the 1954 edition of the MTD, but is to be found in the 1956 edition, indicating that it was founded between those years. The July 20, 1961, edition of the Poughkeepsie Journal from Poughkeepsie, New York, announced that the “Public Service commission today authorized Empire Bus Lines Inc., of Poughkeepsie to purchase the equipment and property of Twilight Bus Line Inc, Red Hook, for $37,000 and to acquire the rights held by the latter for operation of omnibus routes between Red Hook and Poughkeepsie and Hyde Park and Poughkeepsie. Empire proposes to continue the present service of Twilight and at the same fares. The sale results from a desire of the present owners of Twilight to withdraw from the transportation business. Empire now operates intrastate service within Poughkeepsie and between it and the State line at Patterson.

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EMPLOYEES TRANSIT LINES INC. took over on public in Loraine, Ohio, on May 1, 1938, when the Loraine Street Railway closed down. It was still running in 1945. The badge was made in Chicago.

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ENDERS BUS LINES, INC. See Enders Greyhound Lines for information on this company.


ENGELHARD-WASHINGTON BUS COMPANY was operating in the 1940s out of Engelhard, North Carolina, by Mrs. S.M. Gibbs. It ran from Washington to Engelhard, via Yeatsville, Pantego, Belhaven, Scranton, Swan Quarter to Engelhard. Engelhard to Columbia, from Engelhard to Fairfield to Kilkenny, Gum Neck to Columbia, N. C.

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ENGLANDER COACH LINES started as Pocumtuck Bus Lines, Inc. running from Springfield to Greenfield, via Amherst, Massachusetts, in the early 1930s. In 1950 the financially failing company was bought out by Peter C. Snell and his partner, George Sage, who renamed it Englander Coach Lines. How that came about is told in this account published in the January 23, 1955, edition of the Democrat and Chronicle from Rochester, New York: “One early summer, at the close of the spring term at Deerfield, young [George] Sage took a train journey to the Pacific Coast in company with Charles Ufford, a classmate . . . [Sage] passed a few days at the home of his aunt in Beverly Hills, and then decided to go for a bus ride. He knew the routes and schedules of most of the major overline bus companies and he charted his itinerary so that he might take in as many lines as time and his budget allowed. He first rode north along the Pacific seaboard, went southeast to the Atlantic seaboard, rode north to New York and then on to Rochester. He had covered more than half the states in the Union. He slept in the buses and ate catch-as-catch-can at way stations. His clothes were ruined, he was short many baths, but he had decided that he was going to own a bus line. ‘We didn’t encourage the idea,’ Leon W. Sage, his father, said. ‘It sounded like a kid’s dream, and neither his mother nor I was going to drop a penny into a wildcat enterprise.’ The boy went to work that summer painting city light poles, fell off a work truck and suffered a broken arm, finished out the vacation period as a ticket seller in the Blue Bus station. When he returned to school, he had $400 in a bank as venture capital. And the next summer he bought up a bus line that ran from Point Breeze, north of Albion, to Batavia, the chief purpose of which was to move migrant farm laborers to and from their jobs and carry them, as relief from field hand drudgery, to the race track and bingo games at Batavia. President of the company, Sage also drove one of the buses. By now Sage has interested a Deerfield classmate and friend, Peter Snell, son of Mrs. Kenneth Hickman, of Pelham Road, in his enterprises, and the two young men began looking for new bus lines to operate. They found one presently, called the Pocumtuck Bus Line, which ran from Springfield to Greenfield, Mass., via Amherst, and was dragging along in the red. They revived it, changed its name to the Englander Coach Lines, and made a profit with it. In the meantime they decided on a larger operation and purchased the Johnson Bus Lines Inc., which runs from Boston to Milford, Mass., and Woonsocket, R.I. This line also was doing badly until Sage and his partner, Snell, took it over, which they did while the former was still in Babson Institute and the latter an undergraduate at Harvard University. The young men would leave their respective schools each weekend and take a hand in operating two of the buses on Saturday and Sunday. The company originally had 22 buses. This number was reduced to 18, but three new GMC buses were added at a total cost of $66,000. The purchase of the three new buses was made last summer when Sage was granted a week’s furlough from Camp Kilmer, N.J., where he serves in the transportation office. . . . Snell is now in his first year at Harvard Law. Sage will be discharged from the Army late this year. He has now sold the smaller Englander Coach Lines, and is temporarily concentrating on the Johnson Bus Lines Inc. The young men have only two days a week apiece to supervise the management of their company. What they will do when they are able to devote all of their time to their enterprise is something to excite heady speculation.”

As noted in the above article, the partners would later buy out Johnson Bus Lines Inc., which ran from Boston to Milford, Massachusetts. (They ran that company separate from Englander Coach Lines, however, Englander’s buses and drivers came mostly from Johnson Bus Lines.) The only info I’ve found on this company’s later history is a notice of hearing before the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities held on May 22, 1980: “re joint petition of Englander Coach Lines, Inc. (Proposed Transferor) and Rabbit Transit, Inc. (Proposed Transferee) for approval to the assignment and transfer of various Certificates from Proposed Transferor to Proposed Transferee.” Johnson Bus Lines was sold in 1962 to The Short Line. In 1971 a consolidation of The Short Line and Interstate Busses Corp. created the Bonanza Bus Lines.

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ENGLEWOOD & FORT LOGAN BUS COMPANY The Denver Tramway Company ran bus lines as subsidiaries until 1933, to avoid complicating their franchise agreements with the city of Denver, Colorado. The subsidiaries operated under revocable permits issued by the city. The first subsidiary was the Englewood & Fort Logan Bus Company, which connected the end of streetcar Rt. 3 in Englewood with the Veterans Administration facilities at Fort  Logan. The second was the Fitzsimons Bus & Taxi Company, which connected Fitzsimons Army Hospital with downtown Denver along Colfax, 17th, and 18th Avenues. It was purchased by the Denver Tramway Company in 1929 and operated as a subsidiary until it was dissolved in 1943. A third subsidiary, Bus Transportation Company, was formed by the Tramway Company in 1927. It was absorbed into the Denver Tramway Company in 1933.

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ENROKN-BRIDGEVILLE AUTO LINE was operating in 1924 in Eureka, California. W.B. Shively was the registered contact.

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ERIE COACH COMPANY In 1924 the Erie Railway Company (ERC) came into existence and in 1925 a subsidiary named the Erie Coach Company (ECC) was formed to run less expensive bus service as an alternative to expanding the streetcar network in Erie, Pennsylvania. The Erie Metropolitan Transit Authority (EMTA) was formed on September 20, 1966, and took over the routes.

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ERIE COUNTY MOTOR COACH LINES, INC. was a subsidiary bus company of the Erie County Traction Company, which ran streetcars in Buffalo, New York. The Erie County Traction Company was formerly The Buffalo Southern Railway, and, in 1924, connected Buffalo, Hamburg, Orchard Park, Gardenville and Ebenezer; West Seneca, East Hamburg and Lackawanna-East Side. The company began running buses by the late 1920s. Erie County Motor Coach Lines was sold to Buffalo Transit Company, Inc. in 1931.

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ERIE TRANSIT COMPANY EMPLOYEE This company ran streetcars in Erie County, Pennsylvania, in the late nineteenth century. The badge measures 2¼” and is a pin back. (Photo used by permission of eBay member aracin.)

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ESCONDIDO-PALOMAR AUTO LINE was operating in Escondido, California, in 1924. The partners were Hoxie, Hubbard and Stewart.

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ETNA-FORT JONES-YREKN STAGE LINE was operating in 1924 out of Ft. Jones, California. C.A. Reichman was the owner/operator.

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EUGENE-ROSEBURG STAGE was operaing a 72-mile route between Eugene and Roseburg, Oregon, in 1923.

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EUGENE-SHANNON MOTOR ROUTE was operating a route between Eugene and Shannon, Oregon, in 1923.

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EUREKA-BRIDGEVILLE AUTO LINE was operating in the mid 1920s out of Bridgeville, California. George H. Cox was the registered contact.

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EUREKA CITY LINES, INC. was formed by National City Lines in 1939 in Eureka, California, when the city-owned Eureka City Railway was sold to that company. (Eureka City Railway had succeeded Humboldt Transit Company in 1921.) As was its custom across the United States, when National City Lines took over operations they immediately ceased streetcar operations and introduced bus service. According to one story, on the last day of streetcar service a mob of protesting residents burned an old Humboldt Transit Company streetcar in the street and utterly destroyed it. (For more information see the entry under National City Lines.) In 1945 Eureka City Lines ran 9 buses over 10 route miles. The company ceased operations in 1946 and was succeeded by Eureka Transit Lines. Since this company lasted only seven years and ran a small number of buses/routes, its badges are among the rarest out there. The badge here is the first issued, carrying the number “1”; it measures 2½” x 2¾” inches and was made by GREENDUCK CO. CHICAGO.

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Photos courtesy of kygelberhund with contribution of eBay member gumzalot1.

EUREKA SPRINGS ELECTRIC LIGHT & STREET RAILWAY ran in Eureka Springs, Arkansas, from 1891 until 1908 when it was replaced by Citizens Electric Company.

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EUREKA TRACTION COMPANY ran in Eureka Springs, Arkansas, after 1910 and shut down in 1920.

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EUREKA TRANSIT LINES was formed in 1946 and succeeded Eureka City Lines, Inc. running buses in Eureka, California. In 1956 this privately-owned company ran 10 buses over 13 route miles. The company ceased operations in 1961. It is unclear who or what replaced this company for the next several decades, but a history of Eureka vaguely hints that some type of service was in place, as the following quote indicates. “On April 10, 1972, the Eureka city council transferred the operation of Eureka’s transit service to Bishop’s Transit Service, a private company owned by Glen and Lloyd Bishop.” In conjunction with the formation of the Humboldt Transit Authority, the city of Eureka assumed control of the bus system, renamed Eureka Transit Service, on January 20, 1976. The city retained Bishop’s to oversee operations. On February 1, 1985, the city of Eureka began operating Eureka Transit Service independently, no longer contracting operations to Bishop. The badge shown here has two threaded posts and was made by PATRICK & M.K.CO SAN FRANCISCO.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member jsnp188wud. 

EVANSTON BUS COMPANY was formed in 1937 as a consolidation of the Evanston Railway and the Evanston and Niles Center Bus Co., and served several Chicago, Illinois, suburbs. The Evanston and Niles Center Bus Co. was formed in 1930 as a consolidation of the Niles Center Bus Co. and an earlier Evanston Bus Co. The Evanston Bus Company ceased operations in April 1973 due to a strike. Two different badges: the older badge on left has two threaded posts and measures 2½ x 2 ½; the later badge measures 2½ x 2 and has a single threaded post.

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EVANSVILLE CITY COACH LINES took over operations from Southern Indiana Gas & Electric Co. 1948 running public transit in Evansville, Indiana. It was a subsidiary of City Coach Lines of Detroit. It shut down operations on January 31, 1959, after claiming it has lost about one million passengers per year. It was succeeded by Evansville City Transit, which ran until 1971 when it was succeeded by the current transit company, Metropolitan Evansville Transit System.

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EVANSVILLE CITY TRANSIT succeeded Evansville City Coach Lines in 1959 in Evansville, Indiana, and ran until 1971 when it was succeeded by Metropolitan Evansville Transit System.

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EVERGREEN BUS COMPANY See NORTH BEND STAGE LINES, INC. 


EVERGREEN TRAILS, INC. / EVERGREEN TRAILWAYS There’s not a lot of info on this company. It owned certificate #185 “authorizing the giving of service as follows: Passenger and Express Service Between: Kirkland and Monohan, Washington, via Redmond, the route between Kirkland and Redmond to be both via the old highway and the new paved highway;” There is a surviving bus schedule from October 8, 1945 showing that the company served Redmond, Kirkland and Seattle “via Blacktop Highway between Redmond ad Kirkland.” Curiously, the company is not mentioned in the 1939 Russell’s Guide, nor in the 1946 or 1954 MTD. Jon Hobijn writes that the company joined the National Trailways Bus System on May 1, 1957 as Evergreen Trailways, while Chicago Transit & Railfan adds that the company was in business from 1939-1991 and was sold to Northwestern Trailways.

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BUS COMPANEIS BEGINNING WITH THE LETTER “F”


F. O. B. BUS LINE  connected Alexandria with Leesville, Louisiana. More info needed.

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F.& S. TRANSIT COMPANY, INC. was running in South Bend, Indiana, in the late 1910s. There’s little info on this company, other than in the late 1930s Ray C. Shook was its president, and Howard Brotherson was its secretary/treasurer. According to one source the company transported both goods and passengers.

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FAIRFIELD TRANSIT CO.  Sandston, Virginia: Fairfiled Transit, successor to Seven Pines & Sandston Motor Co., was operating 12 buses over 17 route miles in 1945; on Feb. 13, 1976, the company was taken over by Greater Richmond Transit Company. The badge here measures  2″ x 2½” and has a single threaded post and was made by FIFTH AVENUE UNIFORM COMPANY 19 SO. WELLS CHICAGO.

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FAIRLICK STAGES, INC. There’s not much info on this company. It was an intercity company operating in Ohio in the 1930s and, according to one source, in 1936 was bought out by Harry Arnold, who was known for acquiring local and intercity bus companies. The last mention in public records is this from the Newark Advocate from Newark, Ohio, on March 21, 1942: “PUBLIC NOTICE OF APPLICATION to TRANSFER. Public notice is hereby given that a joint application has been filed with the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio to transfer Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from Fairlick Stages, Inc. to E. C. Carter. The transferee agrees to adopt all tariffs and schedules now on file with the said Commission. . . . (Signed) FAIRLICK STAGES. INC.

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FAIRYLAND TRANSPORTATION COMPANY, INC. The Fairyland Hotel was built on top of Lookout Mountain, Tennessee, in 1925. To provide public transportation from downtown Chattanooga to the hotel, the Fairyland Transportation Company was created. (Fairyland Transportation Company was incorporated in Delaware.) The hotel eventually folded, but in May 1929 the bus line was taken over by the Tennessee Electric Power Company, which continued running the company’s Studebaker autobuses.

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FALEY & PICKLE RIVERSIDE BUSS LINE ran in Montevideo, Minnesota, before 1920. The company issued fare tokens. (Note: “Buss” is the way the company spelled its name on their tokens. I’d say it’s like a misspelling made by the token company; however, there’s no way in knowing, since the fare token is the only information available on this company.)

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FALLBROOK & OCEANSIDE STAGE LINE was operating out of Fallbrook, California, in 1924. Jay G. Tucker was the registered contact.

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FARINA’S BUS LINE & TRANSPORTATION COMPANY, INC. was incorporated in Illinois on November 1, 1921. The corporation owned and operated three REO motor buses “with a seating capacity of from thirteen to twenty passengers” and ran between Chicago Heights, Illinois, to the state line at Lansing, Illinois. The corporation was acquired by Shore Line Motor Coach Company, which is noted in the April 26, 1926, edition of The Daily Reporter from Greenfield, Indiana: “MERGER OF TWENTY-FOUR BUS ROUTES IS APPROVED Approval of a merger of twenty-four bus routes in northern Indiana was given Saturday by the public service commission in an order authorizing the purchase of the routes by the Shore Line Motor Coach Co., from the Gary Railways Co., Farina’s Bus Line & Transportation Co. and B. P. Shearon.” (Gary Railways Co., Farina’s Bus Line and B. P. Shearon were all part of  Samuel Insull‘s interests.)

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FARMERVILLE BUS LINE, INC. operated two buses in Farmerville, Louisiana. They were in business in 1956.

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FAY MOTOR BUS COMPANY  Founded by Thomas J. Fay, Fay Motor Bus Company ran a local motor bus line in Rockford, Ill., in the late 1910s-early 1920s. In the latter part of 1920 the company was also granted a certificate of convenience by the Arkansas Corporation Commission to run a bus line from Little Rock to Camp Pike, and began running on October Monday October, 11, 1920. (This company was operated by Ronald R. Fay, the son of Thomas J. Fay.) The company was founded principally to furnish transportation between Rockford and Camp Grant, which was one of the emergency U.S. Army training camps constructed in 1917. The company charged a 5-cent fare with a 2-cent transfer charge. Since their competitor, the Rockford & Interurban Railway, charged 8 cents with two tickets for 15 cents, a feud quickly developed between the two companies. As a result, in early 1922 the Illinois Public Utilities Commission ordered Fay Motor Bus Company to confine its business to picking up passengers in Rockford and conveying them to points outside the city.

Disaster struck the company in September 1922, as reported in the September 26, 1922, edition of the Belvidere Daily Republican from Belvidere, Illinois: “ . . . last evening about 6:30 o’clock, the Fay Motor Bus company garage on Chestnut Street, Rockford, burst into a mass of flames. Two hours later it was in ruins, only part of the first floor wall remaining erect. . . . The fire, which attracted about 10,000 people to the scene, threatened, for a time to wipe out the entire block . . . Several firemen narrowly escaped death when the walls crashed to the pavement, bringing with them high tension voltage electric and telephone wires. . . . The loss is estimated at about $60,000 and was said to mean the finish of the Fay Motor Bus Company.” (The company lost its entire fleet of 32 buses and all its repair equipment.)

The reason the fire spelled the finish of the company is disclosed in another article: “Insurance, which was carried on vehicles and contents of the building while the company was running full force here last spring, amounting to about $52,000, was dropped later in the year, it was explained by bus company officials. Ronald Fay, manager of the company in the absence of his father, Tom Fay, said, ‘this is the finish of the Fay Motor Bus company in Rockford.’

The reason behind the decision to drop their insurance may be glimpsed by the fact that in December 1921 the Fay Motor Bus Company’s creditors filed an involuntary bankruptcy proceeding in a federal court. On January 5, 1922 an injunction was issued by the court restraining Fay Motor Bus Company from disposing of any of its assets pending a decision and the appointment of a receiver. Their financial problems are even more highlighted by another newspaper article, which appeared a few months after the fire. The November 17, 1922, edition of the Republican-Northwestern from Belvidere, Illinois carried this: “CHARGE: CHECK 13 BAD. Thomas J. Fay, former president of the Fay Motor Bus Company, Rockford, is wanted on a warrant by Saginaw, Mich. police for passing worthless checks. He has not been in Rockford for several months and is thought to be in Cleveland, Ohio. He went to Saginaw before the fire which destroyed tho motor bus barn at Rockford.”

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FEATHER RIVER STAGE COMPANY was operating out of Reno, Nevada’s, Union Stage Depot in 1940.

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FEDERAL TRANSPORTATION CO. In the 1920s the White Line Motor Bus Co., Suburban Auto Coach Co. and Federal Transportation Co. merged to form United Motor Coach Co. The company served the northwest suburbs of Chicago.

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FENNESSEY BUS LINES was an intercity bus company running in Missouri in 1941. It served the Union Bus Terminal 600 Walnut St., in Jefferson City.

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FERENCE BROTHERS BUS LINES was owned by brothers Stanley and Frank Ference and operated a single route between Carnegie and Bridgeville, Pennsylvania. This line was sold to Penn Bus Lines in 1928. In 1936 the Ference Brothers started another bus company—the Ohio River Motor Coach Company, which ran until 1964 when it was acquired by Port Authority Transit.

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FERGUSON – BROADWAY BUS LINE / FERG. – BDWAY BUS LINE ran a service in Ferguson, MO., in the 1940s, 1950s & 1960s. In 1963 Bi-State Development Agency (the agency created in 1949 through a compact between Missouri and Illinois and ratified by the United States Congress) acquired 15 private bus companies in the St. Louis, Missouri, metro area forming a coordinated transit system for the region. Included in the Bi-State purchases at the time were the Citizens Coach Co. and Brown Motor Lines of Alton (subsidiaries of the Ferguson-Broadway Bus Line in Missouri), and tho Wood River-Alton Bus Line of Wood River.

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FERGUSON-WELLSTON BUS COMPANY was running in 1926 when it was mentioned in the September 8th edition of the St. Louis Star & Times. It was owned and operated by the Angert Brothers and operated between the suburbs of Ferguson and Wellston in the St. Louis, Missouri, metro area. It is mentioned in the September 30, 1927 edition of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle from Brooklyn, New York, as having been incorporated in September 1927. In December 1948 the company took over the St. Charles line of the St. Louis Streetcar System in the St. Louis suburb of St. John, Missouri.

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FERLAZZO’S BUS LINE, INC. / FERLAZZO BROTHERS was founded by Joseph Ferlazzo in ca. 1919, and operated between Patchogue and Sayville, Long Island, New York. From a history of Sayville is this bit of info: “In April 1920, Islip Town denied line franchise but Ferlazzo continued service ‘until PSC approved or disapproved of Town Board action’. In April 1921, Town awarded a second franchise for route to Ferlazzo and third to the new Blue & White. In June 1923, Frank Gordon (Blue & White) challenged Islip Town giving charter to Ferlazzo Brothers on basis that one of its partners had not received final citizenship papers; however, Ferlazzo retained franchise. In March 1924, Blue & White and Alanson Still bought all of the shares (but not the busses) of Ferlazzo for $ 12,000.” The February 18, 1923, edition of The Brookly Daily Eagle from Brooklyn, New York gives a bit more insight: “Patchogue, L.I. Feb. 17 The mystery surrounding the failure of Alanson Still, operator of a bus line [A. S. STILL & SON AUTO BUS LINE] between here and West Sayville, to serve the injunction which he took out on Wednesday to restrain Ferlazzo Brothers from operating their rival bus line was cleared today with the arrest of three of the Ferlazzo drivers . . . on the ground that they were driving busses on a line for which no franchise had been obtained. A week ago Still’s franchise was renewed but the Ferlazzo Brothers failed to obtain their renewal. Still charges a 15 cent fare while his rivals charge only 5.” It would seem this company went out of business in 1924 after the brothers sold their shares.

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FIDELITY MOTOR BUS LINE, INC. ran in Massillon, Ohio, during the early 1940s and to at least 1977.

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FIFTH AVENUE COACH COMPANY The Fifth Avenue Transportation Company, Ltd. was founded on October 29, 1885, in New York and operated a horse-drawn omnibus service. From 1888 on it was controlled by Elliott Fitch Shepard, who was married to the eldest daughter of William H. Vanderbilt. (As an interesting side note, Shepard was a strict Christian and refused to let his omnibuses operate on Sunday!) E. F. Shepard died in 1893 and three years later his company was forced into bankruptcy. The Fifth Avenue Coach Company was incorporated on July 25, 1896. Under the provisions of the Stock Corporation Law, it took over and possessed “the property and franchises of the Fifth Avenue Transportation Company, Limited.” The company ran routes in the borough of Manhattan, New York City, and portions of the Bronx and Queens. Notably it was the first American bus company to use gasoline-powered buses, and became famous for its use of double-decker buses. The next chapter in the company’s history is told in this excerpt from the June 27, 1924, edition of the New York Times: “$25,000,000 COACH MERGER COMPLETED; Fifth Avenue and Chicago Concerns Combine Their Interests at Conference Here.; TO FORM HOLDING COMPANY.; Interborough Rapid Transit Co. Gives Up Its Control of Coach Line.; DEAL MADE BY JOHN HERTZ.; Better Transportation in New York City is Promised by Former Newspaper Copy Boy. John Hertz, who began as a copy boy in a Chicago newspaper office at the age of 11, yesterday at the age of 43 put through a twenty-five-million-dollar merger of the Fifth Avenue Coach Company and the Chicago Motor Coach Company. The plans for the merger were completed at a conference in the banking office of J. W. Seligman Co., 34 Wall Street. As A result of the deal the Interborough Rapid Transit Company, which controlled 51 per cent of the voting stock of the Fifth Avenue Coach Company, agreed to step out, and arrangements were made for the organization of the Omnibus Company of America as a holding company for the interests involved. These are the Fifth Avenue Coach Company, the New York Transportation Company and the Chicago Motor Coach Company.” (A very detailed history of this company can be found here: Fifth Ave. Coach Company. As an aside, John D. Hertz was also the founder of the famous Yellow Cab in Chicago, the Yellow Coach Manufacturing Company, which was later bought out by General Motors, and he started a car rental business that still bears his name. )

In 1954 the Omnibus Corporation sold Fifth Avenue Coach Co. to the New York City Omnibus Corporation, which later renamed the company as the Fifth Avenue Coach Lines. Eventually the service was taken over by the New York City Omnibus Corporation. The first badge is bronze with a single threaded post, and measures approx. 1½” in diameter. The second badge is die-pressed, measures 2″ x 3″ and is made of brass with a pin back.

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Photo used by permission of eBay member bk.sales.
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Photo used by permission of eBay member houseofmemories802.
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Photos used by permission of eBay member bessiebug05.

FIFTH AVENUE COACH LINES, INC. was the successor company to New York City Omnibus Corporation, operating routes of NYCO and the former Fifth Avenue Coach Company. It also was the parent company of Surface Transit, Incorporated. It should be noted that the corporate identity of the company was inherited from NYCO, even though the “Fifth Avenue” name was used.

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FINGER LAKES COACH LINES was located in South Aurora, New York, and operated between 1953-1954. It was owned by Harry and Leslie Crispell, who also owned Crispell Charter Service and Crispell Brothers. According to one source it was the former Giddings Bus Lines, which ceased operations in 1954.

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FINLEY BUS LINE was founded by Robert H. Finley in Mexico, Missouri, in the early-mid 1940s. The company ran 6 buses over 26 route miles between Mexico and Paris, Missouri. Finley was also the vice president of Northeastern Missouri Greyhound Lines, Inc., which also operated out of Mexico, Missouri. (Finley Bus Line was mentioned in the 1946 MTD but was missing from the 1956 edition.) Robert Finley was also co-owner of Finley-Shotwell Bus Line, which operated out of Kansas City, Missouri.

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FINLEY-SHOTWELL BUS LINE In 1946 the company was located at 905 Campbell St., Kansas City, Missouri. It was owned by Robert H. Finley and W. M. Shotwell, and connected Kansas City with Lee’s Summit, Pleasant Hill and Holden, Missouri. By 1956 it was located at 517 Admiral Blvd. and ran 8 buses. Two drivers for the company were Bill Gard and Frank W. Ketchem. Bill Gard, who was known as “Pop, the bus driver” started with Finley-Shotwell Bus Line during World War II and continued for the next 16 years. Frank Ketchum, who died at the age of 97 in 2014, operated a Kansas City streetcar and then drove from Finley-Shotwell Bus Company. Robert H. Finley was also the owner of Finley Bus Line, which operated out of Mexico, Missouri. In addition, he was the vice president of Northeastern Missouri Greyhound Lines, Inc.

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FISHER’S BUS LINE See Pocumtuck Bus Line.


F. & L. ST. RY. / FITCHBURG & LEOMINSTER STREET RAILWAY was incorporated in 1886 as a three-and-one-half mile horse car line between Fitchburg and Leominster, Massachusetts. Although the company grew over the coming decades, by 1930 only six streetcar lines remained, with three additional routes being run by buses. In 1932, trackless trolley service replaced the streetcars, but eventually these gave way to diesel buses. In 1946 the company ran 7 trackless trolleys over 12.3 route miles, and 63 buses over 170.7 route miles. By the late 1940s buses had replaced the company’s trackless trolleys. The first badge is from the early streetcar days, was made by the American Railway Supply Co., measures a little over 4″ X 1½ “; the second badge is later, and features a bus logo; the third badge is made of nickel and enamel, measures approx. 2¼” x 2″, has two threaded posts. The third badge is a later style, has two threaded posts and measures a little over 1½ x 3⅓”.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member fair0722.
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Photos used by permission of eBay member fair0722.

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FITZSIMONS BUS & TAXI COMPANY  The Denver Tramway Company ran bus lines as subsidiaries until 1933, to avoid complicating their franchise agreements with the city of Denver, Colorado. The subsidiaries operated under revocable permits issued by the city. The first subsidiary was the Englewood & Fort Logan Bus Company, which connected the end of streetcar Rt. 3 in Englewood with the Veterans Administration facilities at Fort Logan. The second was the Fitzsimons Bus & Taxi Company, which connected Fitzsimons Army Hospital with downtown Denver along Colfax, 17th, and 18th Avenues. It was purchased by the Denver Tramway Company in 1929 and operated as a subsidiary until it was dissolved in 1943. A third subsidiary, Bus Transportation Company, was formed by the Denver Tramway Company in 1927. It was absorbed into the Denver Tramway Company in 1933.

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FLASH CITY TRANSIT In 1962 Racine Motor Coach Lines was sold to Lakeshore Transit Racine, Inc., which operated bus service under that name in Racine, Wisconsin. That company discontinued operations in 1968 and Flash City Transit took over bus operations. Flash City Transit was a privately owned company, with its principle owner being Jack Taylor, who moved to Racine in 1955 and founded the Flash Cab Company. Taylor also owned Taylor Enterprises, Inc. and it was this company (i.e., Jack Taylor) that managed Belle Urban System, or “B.U.S.”, which took over transit operations in 1975 from Flash City Transit. Belle Urban System was owned by the City of Racine and managed by Jack Taylor.

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FLINT-CARO-SEBEWAING BUS COMPANY There’s not much to go on, history wise. It was listed in a 1930s WPA Guide to Michigan, serving Flint, Caro and Sebewaing, Michigan. There is a photo of 1925 company bus ticket posted on line, which means the company was around in that year. In 1938 the owner was Frederick Pye. The company was bought by Fred A. Russell in the early 1940s and merged into Russell Bus Lines.

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FLINT CITY BUS I’m not sure what to make of this badge. The owner’s email to this site related: “This came from a badge company that went out of business in Ky. It has a hall mark on back, but I can’t make it out. I think the company was ‘hoag’ — not sure though.” Going on the reference to Kentucky, I find that Flint was an unincorporated community in Calloway County, Kentucky. The badge looks homemade, i.e., a blank was used to place lettering via a letter punch. The badge appears to be made of nickel-plated brass and is of standard size. 

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Photos used by permission of eBay member maelk-69.

FLINT CITY COACH LINES was renamed when the Flint Trolley Coach Company was bought out by City Coach Lines, Inc. It ran in Flint, Michigan, from 1955 until 1964.

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FLINT TROLLEY COACH, INC. On June 8, 1936, Flint, Michigan, voters approved a proposal trolley bus system. Eastern Michigan Railways changed its name to Flint Trolley Coach, Inc., and ordered forty-six Yellow Coaches. The company was sold to City Coach Lines, Inc. in 1955 and the name was changed to Flint City Coach Lines. The badge has two threaded posts and no maker’s mark.

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Photo used by permission of eBay member nancylee46.

FLORIDA CITIES BUS COMPANY was a privately-owned bus system operating in West Palm Beach, Florida. Founded in 1925, it served Palm Beach, West Palm Beach, Lake Worth, Riviera, Like Park and Morrison Field. In 1946 the company was operating 35 buses over 45 route miles. The company lasted until 1959 when its routes were taken over by Transit Company of the Palm Beaches. The badge is a single threaded post, measures 2″x2¼”, and was made by FIFTH AVENUE UNIFORM COMPANY 19 SO. WELLS CHICAGO.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member wisconsinantiques .

FLORIDA MOTOR LINES, INC. was formed in January 1926 by the firm Stone and Webster by buying and consolidating Florida Motor Transportation Company and White Stage Line Company. Based in Orlando, Florida, the company owned 150 coaches and ran some 1,290 route miles. On October 24, 1929, “a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity was issued to Florida Motor Lines to operate motor busses for compensation in transporting passengers on all the highways of the state then being operated upon by the applicant, and especially over State Highway No. 4, between Jacksonville and Miami.” In 1933 the company moved its office to Jacksonville. In January 1946 Florida Motor Lines was sold to The Greyhound Corporation, which renamed it Florida Greyhound Lines. The new Florida Greyhound Lines was the first wholly owned subsidiary of The Greyhound Corporation.

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FLORIDA MOTOR TRANSPORTATION COMPANY was interstate company based in Miami, Florida, and was founded in 1919 by a merger of the Clyde Passenger Express and White Star Auto Line. The line ran as far north as Asheville, North Carolina.  The company officers were J. N. Oliver, president and general manager; W. H. Andrews, vice-president; S. P. Rohineau. secretary and H. H. Moore, treasurer. In 1926 Florida Motor Transportation Company was sold to the firm of Stone and Webster, which consolidated it with another bus company (White Stage Line Company) to form Florida Motor Lines.

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FLUSHING HEIGHTS BUS CORPORATION was a bus operator in the borough of Queens in New York City. It started operations in 1933 and on September 22, 1935, the company and its 25 buses were sold to the North Shore Bus Company, while some of its routes were taken over by the Queens-Nassau Transit Lines.

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RALPH FOLLOWS STAGE LINE was operating in 1924 out of Azusa, California. Ralph M. Follows was the owner/operator.

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F. J. & G. R. R. CO. FONDA, JOHNSTOWN & GLOVERSVILLE RAILROAD was organized in 1867 carrying freight connecting its namesake towns over a 132-mile road in east central New York State to Schenectady, New York. It carried passengers from 1870 until the 1980s to the New York Central (NYC) station at Schenectady. In 1902 a merger of the Cayadutta Electric, FJ&G, and Amsterdam Street Railroad took place using the Fonda, Johnstown and Gloversville Railroad name. There are two badges shown below. The first badge was made by Fifth Avenue Uniform Company; is nickel plated with a single threaded post. The second badge has a single threaded post and two pin posts; marked . “AMERICAN RY SUPPLY CO. NEW YORK”.

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Photos courtesy of eBay member bataviarails.

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FORBESTOWN STAGE LINE was operating in 1924 out of Oroville, California. E.A. Boehme was the owner/operator.

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FORD & BLESSING BUS LINE began operations on November 1, 1924 running a route into Whitwell, Tennessee. The company was managed by H. W. Blessing. On October 1, 1925 the company began operating its 15-passenger REO buses over the new Dixie Highway, which ran to Winchester, Tennessee via Jasper, Monteagle and Cowan. H. W. Blessing bought Cherokee Motor Coach’s route from Chattanooga to Huntsville, Alabama on May 23, 1932.

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FORT BRAGG COACH COMPANY was operating in the mid 1920s out of Fayetteville, North Carolina. Authorized Operation: Fayetteville to Fort Bragg, Highway No. 53. It was still operating in the 1940s.

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FORT BRAGG UNION LANDING AUTO LINE was operating out of Fort Bragg, California, in 1924. L.F. Thompson was owner/operator.

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FT. DODGE, DES MOINES & SOUTHERN TRANSPORTATION COMPANY was running in 1927 in Boone, Iowa. In February 1931 it was purchased by Interstate Transit Lines, which was a bus subsidiary of the Chicago & North Western Transportation Company. At the time of the sale the company was operating 38 buses. More info is to be found in Railway Age, Volume 91, 1931: “In May, 1930, Interstate Transit Lines acquired the Sioux Falls Traction System bus line which had a network of routes between Sioux City, Iowa and Sioux Falls, S.D. . . . Early this year a system of local motor coach lines in the vicinity of Des Moines, Iowa, was acquired through the purchase of the Ft. Dodge, Des Moines & Southern Transportation Co. The 550 miles of lines acquired intersect the main line between Chicago and Omaha at several points, and provide feeders to the main line. Thirty-six motor coaches were involved in this purchase.” 

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Fort Harrison Bus Line Inc. 1959


FORT LAUDERDALE TRANSIT (Fort Lauderdale Transit Lines, Inc.)  ran in the city of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, prior to 1967, which is the year Beach Transit took over the system. The badge has to threaded posts.

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FORT SMITH CITY LINES There’s only one mention of this company on the Internet, and that is in a 1968 newspaper article mentioning the manager, Roland St. John. It is not mentioned in the 1946-47 edition of  the Mass Transportation’s Directory, nor their 1952, 1954 or 1956 editions. Judging by the old style bus on the badge, it looks like the company might date from the 1950s. The badge is die pressed with a single threaded post and a pin post, and measures 2⅝”.

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Photo courtesy of kygelberhund.

FT. WORTH AUTO BUS COMPANY was a subsidiary of Northern Texas Traction Company and ran in 1921.

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FORTUNA-BRIDGEVILLE STAGE LINE was operating in the mid 1920s out of Rohnerville, California. C. W. Gordon was listed as an administrator.

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FOSTER BUS LINE / D. S. FOSTER BUS LINE was founded in the early 1920s by Dalton S. Foster (1889-1975) in Alma, Michigan. His line served south central Michigan between Clare and Lansing. In April 1945 Foster sold his company to Great Lakes Greyhound, which took over the Clare-Lansing run on April 20. In 1943 Dalton Foster was re-elected to serve a third term as president of the Michigan Motor Bus Association, Inc.

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M.C. FOSTER BUS LINE was an intercity company serving Missouri and Iowa. The March 23, 1936, edition of the Cedar Rapids Gazette noted “Operation of the M. C. Foster bus line, for passenger and express service between Cedar Rapids and St. Louis will start Wednesday.” In June 1943 the Interstate Commerce Commission authorized Burlington Transportation Company to purchase M.D. Foster Bus Line. (Burlington Transportation Company would eventually become Burlington Trailways.) One of the company’s drivers was Stanley B. Nicholson, who was interviewed by the local press in 1978: “He has been driving since 1919, and is very proud of his driving record. ‘I taught myself to drive in April 1919 in a Model T Ford touring car. I bought my first car in May 1928 – a Model A Roadster with a rumble seat, which cost $564,’ Nicholson remembers. ‘I worked at the Ice Plant at that time, and it didn’t take long to pay for it, because I was making $23 a week,’ he says. He began working for the M.C. Foster Bus Line in 1936. In 1943 he began his career with Trailways, and began keeping track of the number of people he carried on his bus trips. When he retired in 1971, the number had grown to 473,263 people. Nicholson retired Feb. 6, 1971 from the Continental Trailways Bus System, after driving an estimated 2,500,000 miles for the company. During his career as a bus driver, he was awarded a million mile safety plaque for no personal injury accidents.”

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THE $4.00 LINE PORTLAND – SEATTLE This odd sounding company ran a bus line back in the 1930s and was part of the North Coast Lines. The badge has two threaded posts on the back.

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FOURET BROTHERS, INC. A certificate of operation was granted on December 12, 1927, “to operate a motor vehicle passenger line within the city of Trinidad, Colorado, and adjacent points.” The company also received approval “to operate an ‘Anywhere for Hire Auto Passenger and Baggage Transportation Service’ in and out of Trinidad and Las Animas, County.” The line served Trinadad, Cokedale and Bon Carbo, Colorado, in 1927-1928 and was still in business in 1930.

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FOX VALLEY BUS LINES, INC. was formed by the Aurora Elgin & Fox River Electric Company as a subsidiary to operate a bus service in place of rail service between Aurora and Yorkville, Illinois. The company was acquired by National City Lines in 1936.

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FOXBORO-MANSFIELD BUS COMPANY was operating in the mid 1920s out of Foxboro, Massachusetts. In 1946 the company served Foxboro, Mansfield, Walpole, Sherborn, Framingham, Easton, Canton, Sharon, Attleboro, Norton, Brockton, Wrentham, and Medfield, Massachusetts, with 25 buses over 66 route miles. The company is not listed in the 1954 MTD.

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FRANCISCAN LINES which also operates under the name San Francisco Sightseeing, is located in San Francisco, California. This organization primarily operates in the Sightseeing Bus business / industry within the Local & Suburban Transit & Interurban Highway Transportation sector. This organization has been operating for approximately 51 years. The badge has two threaded posts.

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FRANK L. GOULD BUS LINES  See GOULD BUS LINES


FRANKLIN BUS LINES served Monroe, Jonesboro and Natchitoches, Louisiana. In the late 1940s and early 1950s they were running two round trips daily to Natchitoches and three to Eros-Chafham- Jonesboro.  The company is not listed 1954 edition of the MTD.

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FRANKLIN-MURFREESBORO BUS COMPANY, INC. was operating out of Franklin, Virginia, in the mid 1920s. Authorized Operation: Murfreesboro to State Line, destination Franklin, Va., Highway No. 485.

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FRANKLIN PARK BUS COMPANY started running in Franklin Park, Illinois, in January 1926. Their route ran from Chicago to Franklin Park. Aside from a court dispute with Wilcox Transportation Company in 1925, there isn’t much more in the way of info on this company.

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FRED HARVEY BUS LINES operated out of Springfield, Missouri, in 1941. The bus company used the Union Depot, 303 W. Olive St., and the Greyhound-Union Bus Terminal, 460 St. Louis Street, in Springfield, Missouri. The company was still running in April 25, 1950, when it was mentioned in The Sedalia Democrat from Sedalia, Missouri, as applying to the Missouri Public Service Commission to operate buses from Marshall Junction to Columbia, Missouri over U. S. 40.

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FRENCH GULCH-CAMILLO STAGE LINE was operating in 1924 out of Carrville, California.

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FRENCH GULCH-CARRVILLE AUTO LINE was operating in the mid1920s out of Trinity Center, California. The contact names were James H. Stone and Dave Willis.

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FRESNO MUNICIPAL LINES 1939-1946 Fresno City Lines ran in Fresno, California, from 1939 until 1961 when the City of Fresno took over the bus service. It was renamed Fresno Municipal Lines. The badge has two threaded posts.

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FRESNO-ORANGE COVE AUTO LINE was operating in 1924 out of Fresno, California. H.H. Hardwick was the owner/operator.

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FRESNO-RIVERDALE STAGE COMPANY was operating in 1924 out of Riverdale and Fresno, California. E. Harris and D.M. Rite were the agents/owners/operators.

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FRESNO TRANSIT replaced Fresno Municipal Lines and ran in the city of Fresno, California, from 1967 until 1988. The badge has two threaded posts and was made by “SUN BADGE CO. L. A. COUNTY”.

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Photo used by permission of eBay member lostmynumber.

FRICKLE TRANSFER LINCOLN NEBR. This badge is probably unique. On one side it reads “FRICKLE TRANSFER LINCOLN NEBR.” and on other side it reads “MERIDIAN BUS LINE”. It looks like the Frickle Transfer badge was made by recycling the Meridian badge. It may have been the same company with a name change. The only info I can find on the Net for this company is in the October 17, 1940, edition of The Belleville Telescope from Belleville, Kansas: the article mentions someone shipping via Frickle Transfer. There’s one more, which is an ad in the August 24, 1952, edition of the Lincoln Star newspaper. The badge looks like it is made of nickel.

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FRISCO TRANSPORTATION COMPANY / FRISCO TRAILWAYS The company was founded in 1938 as a subsidiary of the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway (Frisco), and began operations on June 17 of that year. They ran between Seneca and Springfield, Illinois, with 8-passenger auto-buses, which were painted “ivory with black fenders, radiator shell and snubbers, and aluminum colored top and wheels. They had a red belt around the middle, they carried the Frisco logo on the side, and displayed the ‘Frisco Transportation Company’ in aluminum colored letters on a red background along the top sides.” By the early 1940s the company was operating regular buses and had added Afton, Oklahoma to their route. In 1950 “the bus company assumed a new identity, separate from the FTC trucking division, by adopting the new name of ‘Frisco Trailways.’” With declining ridership, in the spring of 1962 Frisco Trailways discontinued all passenger bus service. (Information from the November 1986 edition of All Aboard, Vol. 1, #6, published by The Frisco Railroad Museum.)

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FRONTIER COACH LINES, INC. / CHAMPLAIN-FRONTIER COACH LINES “Soon after [John D.] Hertz acquired control of Fifth Avenue Coach in 1924, its operations were extended, through new subsidiaries, into other states and Canada. In 1926, Gray Line Motor Tours, which operated sightseeing buses in the City and to outside points such as Bear Mountain, was acquired; in 1929 Frontier Coach Lines was organized in Massachusetts to operate a line between Boston and Montreal and sightseeing buses in Boston; and in the same year Champlain Coach Lines, a New York corporation, was organized to operate a line between New York and Montreal.” (Swaine, Robert T. 2007. The Cravath Firm and Its Predecessors 1819-1947. New Jersey: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.) Since the company was under the same ownership as the Champlain Coach Lines, Inc., it was often advertised as the Champlain-Frontier Coach Lines and indeed the two companies issued joint bus schedules. In the 1930s and 1940s the company’s president and director was Frederick T. Wood, who was also a director and VP of Madison Avenue Coach Company, Inc.; director and vice-chairman of the Board of the New York City Omnibus Corporation; a director and chairman of the Board of the Fifth Avenue Coach Company; a director and president of the Champlain Coach Lines. In 1940 the company ran 9 buses over 238 route miles; it was not listed in the 1946 MTD.

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A.G. FRUITS STAGES LINES was operating out of Tres Pinos, California, in 1924. A.G. Fruits was the owner.

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FRURIP BUS LINE began an intercity bus service from Lagrange, Indiana, in 1925. The company’s schedule was printed in the August 18, 1927, edition of The Waterloo Press from Waterloo, Indiana: “The Frurip Bus Line of LaGrange, under the management of. J. K. Duff, has established a motor bus line through Waterloo, the schedule taking effect on Tuesday of this week. This schedule was inaugurated after the discontinuance of the bus line of the Indiana Service Corporation on Monday. The following is the schedule: ‘ Leave 7 A. M. Fort Wayne for Waterloo; Pleasant Lake; Angola; LaGrange; Kendallvllle.

There is an interesting article about his company published in the May 23, 1925, edition of the The Indianapolis Star from Indianapolis, Indiana, which outlines Frurip Bus Line’s battle with city officials over a permit. If I read this right, it seems to say that Frurip Bus Line was part of the local street railway company: “The Frurip bus line of Lagrange asked for a beginner’s certificate for the route from Fort Wayne to Kendallville,  said Mr. Latta. ‘A common carrier undertakes to carry all persons. We propose to show that this operation has not been authorized in compliance with the act of 1913, which provides ways for a person or corporation to obtain the right to use streets and highways for private gain. The Indianapolis jitney ordinance does not purport to grant the right to use the streets, and an ordinance cannot supersede a law. To use the streets lawfully there must be a contract under the 1913 law. We shall show that the petitioner never had a contract, but paid only license fees, and that doesn’t constitute a right to carry passengers and make money. We shall show that the petitioner has persistently violated the law denying the use of Monument circle as a station for the loading and unloading of passengers, and as a waiting place for carriers. We contend that the petitioner is not entitled to a certificate as a matter of right, but must file his application as a beginner and be heard on the question of convenience and necessity. Mr. Latta asserted that Sec. 2 of the bus regulation law, which establishes ninety days of lawful operation as a warrant for a certificate without further proof of convenience and necessity, Is an unreasonable classification, and is violative of the Federal constitution. . . . Commissioner Jones suggested that questions of constitutionality were for the courts and not the commission to decide, and Mr. Latta agreed with him. ‘The street railway company claims,’ continued Mr. Latta, ‘that it is operating under a permit requiring it to give all the service the city requires. Until April 25 it did not have the corporate power to operate busses. The Supreme court of Indiana said in the Greensburg water case that an indeterminate permit has the effect of a new contract. We maintain that the permit prevents any other person from giving any kind of service unless we fail. As we offer to give the service, it is our position that the giving of a certificate without proof of our failure to perform the service constitutes a violation of our contract with the state.’ Mr. Henderson emphasized the question of the coach company’s reported refusal to accept colored persons, declaring that such refusal constituted a violation of express statutes and of the constitutional bill of rights, and that the company could not claim to have operated its busses lawfully. He cited a statute providing that all persons shall have equal privileges in public conveyances. Told not to refuse anybody. Mr. Noel followed with a statement for the coach company, declaring that It had been operating for sixteen months, and had hauled 1,680,000 passengers, he said explicit instructions had been issued to accept negroes. Cases of reported refusal were probably explainable, he said, by the failure of the persons to signal the busses properly. Drivers had been discharged for not accepting negroes, he declared. ‘We do not believe there is any merit to the contentions offered here,’ he continued. ‘We contend that we have faithfully followed all laws and ordinances, if not in strict form, then substantially. If any errors appear in the records, they are due to clerical slips, or to inadvertent omissions. As indicated in the attorney general’s opinion, we do not believe a special grant is necessary. The attorney general’s opinion answers thoroughly the contention about compliance with the 1913 law.’ Mr. Noel referred here to an opinion of Attorney General holding that truck and bus operators could not be said to have been operating unlawfully, because they did not obtain a franchise or grant.

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C.R. FUDGE AUTO LINE was operating in 1924 out of the Collins Hotel in Fresno, California.

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FUGATE & GIRTON  The only information on this company seems to indicate a shipping company in Springfield, Ohio. However, the badge clearly shows a bus. The badge is a single threaded post.

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FULLERTON-PLACENTIA BUS LINE was operating out of Fullerton, California, in the 1924. Cory G. Hoff was the owner/operator.

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FUQUA BUS LINES was founded by Joe T. Fuqua in June 1932. By 1957 it was running ten buses, including a Flxible, a GM and a 1956 Chevrolet airport limousine. Located in Bowling Green, Ky., it ran a regular schedule from Bowling Green to Owensboro, Kentucky’s, Greyhound Station on 311 E. Main Street. It also served Mogantown, Cromwell, Beaver Dam, Hartford, Smiths Green, Scottsville, Somerset, Glasgow, Edmonton and Columbia, Ky.

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LOUIS A. FUOCO BUS LINE ran in Suffolk County, on Long Island, New York, from 1962 until 1996. It was based in East Patchogue and served Patchogue, East Patchogue, Hagerman, Bellport, South Haven, Mastic, Mastic Beach, Port Jefferson, Medford, Coram, Ridge, Calverton, and Riverhead.

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A site about collecting transit badges and discovering the histories of the companies that issued them.

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