Greyhound Bus Badges

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Part of Darrell’s Greyhound badge, pin & button collection.
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(NOTE: the Pickwick Greyhound button in the lower photo spread is a reproduction made by The Waterbury Button Company.)

In the small, slightly strange world of transit badge collecting, Greyhound badges rule, which is why they often attract better prices at auction than local transit badges. The good news is that since The Greyhound Lines Corporation of yesteryear was so large, there are a fair number of surviving antique Greyhound badges floating around out there. Even better, because Greyhound was once comprised of many different operating companies there are numerous different examples to collect.


So let’s start with the basics: the majority of early Greyhound badges were made by the Maier-Lavaty Company oChicago, which was founded by Jerome Maier and Otto Lavaty. The other notable Greyhound badge maker was Benoit Pasquales Company of San Francisco. “PASQUALE S.F. CAL.” or the Benoit Pasquale Company of San Francisco, CA. This company started in 1854 at 103 Fifth Avenue in San Francisco but primarily did a large amount of business between 1879 and 1950. It was noted for the manufacture of Army and Navy Badges and other medals, and through the early 1900s, few other companies rivaled their diversity and quality, especially with respect to military uniform items. They also made police, fire and transit badges. The company went by several names: B. P. Co (Benont Pasquale Company) being one and PASQUALE S.F. CAL. another. They also had a hallmark: a P in a diamond.

When it comes to Greyhound gold service pins (10K, 14K and gold filled), most of these were made by LGB, which stands for L.G. Balfour Company. Lloyd Garfield “Bally” Balfour founded the company in 1913 in Attleboro, Massachusetts; it became famous for making school class rings and gold pins, especially fraternity pins and company anniversary pins.. 

Below are examples of Maier-Lavaty and Pasquales’ makers marks on badges. Also displayed is an ink blotter from Maier-Lavaty Co.

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Photo courtesy of kygelberhund.

The next thing to point out about Greyhound badges is that there are six basic types or designs, along with some variations. As for the reverse of the badges, the early examples by Pasquale have a single threaded post and a pin post, while all the other types have two threaded posts. The problem with these different badges is dating. Since I have yet to find any records to show when a badge design was introduced, I have had to rely on old photographs and sort of “guesstimate” when they were in use. But this is far from satisfactory since many senior drivers seem to have used their original issued badges until their retirement. I can illustrate this by going back to 1971 (or thereabouts) when I was traveling by Greyhound from Atlanta, Georgia, to Tampa, Florida. Our gray-haired driver was wearing a badge that was at least 30 years old and stood out like the proverbial sore thumb amongst those of his fellow drivers. The long and short of it is that dating a Greyhound Lines badge is by no means precise.


TYPE 00 This badge is placed here with this designation because it doesn’t fit into the category of a bus operator’s badge. Strictly speaking, it is a badge, but was mounted on door escutcheon in early Greyhound bus terminals. See The Greyhound Lines for more information and photos.


TYPE 1a is the earliest badge and can be found in two varieties. One is brass with cloisonné enamel inlay. The other variety is made of nickel plated brass with cloisonné enamel inlay. Both measure approximately 2 ½ x 2 ½ inches and were made by Maier-Lavaty. The lettering is smooth with the surface of the badge. It dates from about 1930 to perhaps the mid 1930s. (NOTE: Florida Greyhound Lines, which was formed in 1946, issued badges of this design. The badge maker is not imprinted on the back, which would mean that the company used an old Type 1a badge design and had it reproduced by a contemporary badge company.)


TYPE 1b is the same design but heavier badges in nickel plated brass with heavy enamel coloring also made by Maier-Lavaty. The name of the operating company and the word “LINES” are recessed into the metal, while the word “GREYHOUND” is raised. It measures approximately 2 ½ x 2 ½ inches and probably dates to the mid to late 1930s.

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Above, L-R, Type 1a & Type 1b. These types were used by various Greyhound operating companies whose names are featured on the tops of the badges. Photos courtesy of kygelberhund.

TYPE 1c is a design which is rarely seen on a badge, probably because it was introduced shortly before Type 2 badges were put into production. Below left is an example from Teche Greyhound.

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Photo courtesy of kygelberhund.

TYPE 1d is similar to Type 1c, but the bus image is a full side view and is not engraved into the badge, nor is the running greyhound image. This design seems to have been used about 1935 or later and rarely turns up. There are no markings on the reverse, which has two threaded posts.

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Photos used by permission of Dr. Dixie Klein; the badge belonged to former Northland Greyhound Lines driver Gustav Rudolph Fredrickson.
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Photo used by permission of eBay member jedand.

TYPE 1e. I’m not sure where this badge fits in. It is of inferior quality compared to the other badges listed in the Type 1 series and it appears to be of later manufacture. Also note that the bus and Greyhound image are facing opposite when compared other badges and there is no red coloring present. Indeed it looks almost identical to a badge used by Crown Coach Lines, which was a Greyhound subcontractor operating out of Joplin, Missouri, from the late 1930s thru the 1960s. It measures approx. 3 inches which is ½ inch more than the other Type 1 badges.

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Lower photo used by permission of eBay member lectronicslad.

TYPE 1f. Another badge that is something of a mystery. It looks like it was made much later than the badges in this series and is perhaps a fairly modern production. It measures about 3 inches.

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TYPE 1g. This looks like it was made much later than the badges in this series. It measures about 3 inches.

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TYPE 1h This is another mystery badge. The bus image in the center indicates a badge made in the 1930s, however the image is not known on any early Greyhound badge or logo. There are two possibilities for this badge: 1) the design coupled with the new appearance of the badge suggest this is a recent production, i.e., what is known among collectors as a “fantasy” piece. 2) it is possible that this is a salesman’s sample or a prototype that was never issued and remained in storage until recently. The badge has the dimensions of a typical Greyhound badge of the 1930s with a single threaded post and a pin post.

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Photos courtesy of eBay member bm75.

TYPE 2a is heavy nickel plated brass badge made by Pasquale. It measures approximately 2 ½ x 2 ½ inches and likely dates from the mid to late 1930s. With cloisonné enamel coloring, it has a single threaded post.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member antiquegirl530.

TYPE 2b Although the design is found on a Greyhound route map from 1931, the badge dates from the mid or later 1930s. Below right is an example with two threaded posts that doesn’t include the manufacturer’s name on the reverse; it is colored with enamel paint that is usually found heavily worn or completely missing. Below left is an example of cloisonné enamel coloring made by Maier-Lavaty.

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Photos courtesy of kygelberhund.

TYPE 3a These are heavy nickel-plated brass, with blue cloisonné enamel. These are found with the generic “The Greyhound Lines” or the name of the operating company in raised letters, such as the example used for Type 3b. No maker’s mark on the badge, however numerous examples have retaining nuts that are marked “L.G. Balfour Co.

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The reverse of the above badge and an enlargement of the retaining nut with the L.G. Balfour Co. marking.

TYPE 3b This badge look similar to Type 3a, but is a thin nickel die pressed example with blue enamel paint with or without the Greyhound operating company in raised letters. It measures approximately 2 ½ x 2 ½ inches Also, it differs from Type 3a by not having a blank for an employee I.D. number. There is no maker’s mark, but some badges have nuts that are marked “L.G. Balfour Co.” They date from the early1940s.

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Photo courtesy of kygelberhund.

TYPE 3c is made of celluloid and has mounting holes so the badge can be sewn onto a cap. It measures 2½” x 2½”.

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Photo courtesy of eBay member bessiebug05.

TYPE 4 is a thinner die-struck badge made of nickel and enamel with polished nickel accents. It measures approximately 2 ½ x 2 ½ inches. They date from the 1940s-1950s. Maker unknown but probably Maier-Lavaty. Note that employee identification numbers seem to have been phased out during the tenure of this badge type. One often finds a blank number plate, or filled with the initials of the operating company, such as the example used here showing initials for Southwest Greyhound Lines.

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Photos courtesy of kygelberhund.

TYPE 5 is a large heavy brass badge painted blue. It measures approximately 2″ x 2½” and dates from the 1960s. These badges are known for paint loss. Some examples are marked “LGB”, while others are unmarked. (LGB stands for Lloyd Garfield “Bally” Balfour, who founded the L.G. Balfour Company in 1913. The company is known for making gold pins, especially fraternity pins and company anniversary pins. The company made most of Greyhound’s gold award pins in 10K, 14K and gold filled. They also made some badges.) The Type 5 badge was also used for Greyhound’s subsidiary, Greyhound Van Lines, Inc. (That company used the motto “Leave the Moving to Us”, which was a play on the Greyhound Lines’ “Leave the Driving to Us” motto.) 

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Photos courtesy of kygelberhund.
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A variety of the Type 5 badge. Photos used by permission of eBay member ncsu602.

TYPE 6 is an oval shaped heavy nickel badge measuring approximately 2″ x 2½” inches. Two threaded posts; maker unknown. Dating from the 1970s they are found in plain nickel finish, red, white & blue paint and also gold plated. (The gold plated badges are marked “INSTRUCTOR”.) Later badges have the ® mark under the Greyhound logo.

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All photos courtesy of kygelberhund.

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Did They Have One, or Didn’t They?

Before looking at the different Greyhound badges, let’s get one thing straight: no one seems to know for sure how many of the Greyhound operating companies — and there were oodles of ‘em — had their own badges, or used a generic Greyhound company badge. So, I’m going to list all the known Greyhound operating companies (at least the ones I know about) and the corresponding badge, if one is known.

A NOTE ABOUT THE BADGE PHOTOS: I have been collecting transit badge for about three decades. Although I have seen many hundreds of badges in my travels, I have been very selective in my purchases. Photos the Greyhound badges in my collection are here on this page. In addition to collecting the actual badges, over the years I have saved images of badges when I came across them on the Internet via auctions. Since I had in mind to some day build this webpage, I always contacted the photo’s owner to ask permission to use his/her photo. Almost always permission was given. I also offered to give credit for the photos, although most owners declined. Those who asked for credit are noted under the photo of the badge entry. Those entries with no credit are either from my own collection, or the owners did not request credit. Photos in the public domain are not credited.

A NOTE ABOUT THE HISTORICAL BACKGROUND: As far as the historical information I provide for each operating company, it is brief. However, if you want to get more into that part of things, then the best information anywhere on The Greyhound Corporation is Dr. D.B. “Doc” Rushing’s webpage Bluehounds and Redhounds the History of Greyhound and Trailways. In my opinion it’s worth its weight in gold! In fact, Dr. Rushing has kindly given permission to use his history, which I do for background information on several Greyhound operating companies. An excellent article on The Greyhound Corporation’s early history, and its founder, Carl Eric Wickman, can be found in Margaret Walsh’s TRACING the HOUND: The Minnesota Roots of The Greyhound Bus Corporation, which was published in the Minnesota Historical Society’s Minnesota History Magazine in Winter/1985. (Also see the MESABA TRANSPORTATION COMPANY entry on this webpage.)

A NOTE ABOUT GREYHOUND BUTTONS: This may be out of place, but some collectors do like old Greyhound uniform buttons. For your information, The Waterbury Button Company makes reproduction Greyhound uniform buttons. (I show one of these at the top of this page, which is for the Pickwick Greyhound Lines.)

Okie Dokie, without further ado and in alphabetical order, we’ll look at each of the operating companies and their badges — or some related memorabilia — to help fill in the gaps.


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1933 CHICAGO WORLD’S FAIR 

The Greyhound Lines was one of the major exhibitors at the 1933 Chicago World’s Fair Greyhound. They also ran specially-made people-mover buses from the parking area to the gates of the fair and inside from pavilion to pavilion. For the event Greyhound drivers were issued with specially-made badges and they are, perhaps, the rarest of all Greyhound badges. (The badge is marked MAIER-LAVATY CO. CHICAGO. Measures, 2 ½ X 2 ½ inches.) This badge is one of two of the rarest Greyhound badges. As to the number made, according the book Hounds of the Road by Carlton Jackson (p. 46), Greyhound employed 120 drivers for the Fair, which would strongly indicate that at least this number of badges were produced. I would guess that no more than 200 badges were produced, making this an extremely rare Greyhound badge and one that is greatly underpriced.

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1939 NEW YORK WORLD’S FAIR

As they were in 1933, Greyhound Lines was one of the major exhibitors at the 1939 New York World’s Fair and again ran specially-made people-mover buses. For the event Greyhound drivers were issued with specially-made badges from Maier-Lavaty Co. Chicago, measuring 2 ½ X 2 ½ inches with two threaded posts.

As to the number produced, the example shown here is numbered at 205, which would indicate that at least two hundred five badges were produced. The rarity of the badge is the reason that there is a reproduction on the market: a September 2017 listing on eBay gives some background:

You are viewing a beautiful (highly detailed) 3-D stamped, Greyhound Bus Drivers Badge for the 1939 New York World’s Fair. These have been highly sought after among Badge Collectors. It measures 2 ½ inches from top to bottom. It has 2 mounting studs on the back. My original customer that had me make one for himself, wanted the reproduction EXACTLY like his original, so even the original badge makers name is on the back. The 12 badges that I made; each have a different number stamped. This rare Greyhound Bus Drivers Badge, is ‘ONE’ of only ’12’ that were custom made by Nostalgic Reflections of Veradale, Washington.

As far as I know, the 1939 New York World’s Fair badge is the only reproduction Greyhound badge ever made. (When I asked Jerry Turner, owner of Nostalgic Reflections, about the numbers used on the 12 repro-badges, he answered: “The numbers were engraved at random. I did not keep track of them.”) The photos below top feature original New York World’s Fair Greyhound badges, while below that is a photo of the modern reproduction. (Note that on the original badge that the two mounting pins for the running Greyhound logo on the reverse of the badge are at a different angle and distance than those on the reproduction badge.)

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The 1939 World’s Fair reproduction badge. Photo courtesy of Jerry Turner of Nostalgic Reflections.

ATLANTIC GREYHOUND LINES, INC. was a Greyhound regional operating company based in Charleston, West Virginia from 1931 until 1960. There are two somewhat different versions of the company’s history. One states that “Atlantic Greyhound was incorporated in 1936 with the merger of Atlantic Greyhound Lines of Georgia, Atlantic Greyhound Lines of North Carolina, Old South Lines and other operators.” Dr. Duncan B. “Doc” Rushing’s history offers a different account: 

In 1931 Arthur M. Hill (who bought the White Transportation Company and the Huntington-Charleston Motor Bus Company and combined them as the Midland Trail Transit Company in July 1924, and who formed the Blue & Gray Company in 1927 to buy his Midland Trail Transit Company) and John Lash Gilmer (who owned Camel City Coach Company) and some other investors, organized Atlantic Greyhound Lines. In December 1929 Hill and Gilmer combined their routes and companies by creating a holding company named National Highway Transport. In 1929  Arthur Hill, John Gilmer and Guy Huguelet (of the Consolidated Coach Corporation, based in Lexington, Kentucky, which in 1931 was renamed Southeastern Greyhound Lines), organized another bus company, based in Roanoke, Virginia named Old Dominion Stages. In 1932 Hill and Gilmer bought Huguelet’s interest in Old Dominion Stages and merged the company into Atlantic Greyhound Lines. By 1934 Atlantic Greyhound’s main East Coast route was from Washington, D. C., to Jacksonville, Florida via Richmond, Raleigh, Wilmington, Charleston and Savannah. By 1937 The Greyhound Corporation owned a controlling interest in Atlantic Greyhound Lines. By 1957 the corporation owned Atlantic Greyhound lock, stock and barrel. Doc Rushing writes:

“[In] November 1960, in another round of consolidation, Greyhound merged the Atlantic GL with – not into but rather with – the Southeastern GL, based in Lexington, Kentucky, a neighboring regional company – thereby forming the Southern Division of The Greyhound Corporation, called also the Southern [Greyhound Lines], the third of four huge new divisions (along with Central, Eastern, and Western). Thus ended the Atlantic GL and the Southeastern GL, and thus began the Southern [Greyhound Lines]” 

The badge below is a Type 1a and is marked MAIER-LAVATY CO. CHICAGO. Measures, 2 ½ X 2 ½ inches. Types 1b and 1c were also made.

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Photos courtesy of kygelberhund.

ATLANTIC GREYHOUND LINES OF GEORGIA, INC. / ATLANTIC GREYHOUND LINES OF NORTH CAROLINA, INC.

Without doubt the two companies listed in the title are part of Atlantic Greyhound Lines’ corporate history. Exactly how they fit I leave to others to untangle, although the company doesn’t seem to have any business connection to THE GREYHOUND LINES OF GEORGIA, other than both being part of The Greyhound Corporation. I present the following as additional information on the company’s founding. According to Chicago Transit & Railfan,

“Atlantic Greyhound Lines (AGL) – incorporated 1936 as merger of Atlantic Greyhound Lines of Georgia (AGGA), Atlantic Greyhound Lines of North Carolina (AGNC), Old South Lines (OSL), and several other companies. Consolidated 1960 into Southern Division of Greyhound. Atlantic Greyhound Lines of Georgia had been formed in 1931 as a subsidiary of Camel City Coach Co., renamed that same year to Atlantic Greyhound Lines of Georgia. Atlantic Greyhound Lines of North Carolina had been formed in 1925 as Camel City Coach Co., renamed in 1931 to Atlantic Greyhound Lines of North Carolina. And Old South Lines was incorporated 1933 as another subsidiary of Camel City Coach Co.”

The Florida Division of Corporations records show that the ATLANTIC GREYHOUND LINES OF GEORGIA, INC. filed papers on March 25, 1931, and was based in the state of Georgia. Their records show the company was dissolved on August 11, 1936, “by proclamation.” The registered agent was A. Y. Milam, and their officers included A. M. Hill, Charleston, W. Virginia. Others were J. W. Alspaugh, C. T. Leinbach, J. L. Gilmar, Bliss R. McCrum and Harry C. Grossman. (As noted, some of these names are one and the same as those in the history of Atlantic Greyhound Lines, Inc.)


BRISTOL GREYHOUND This is not a Greyhound company, although there is a tenuous connection. However, I am listing it here because it is the logical place for it. History: Greyhound Motors, later known as Bristol Greyhound, was an English bus and coach company formed in February 1921 by Sydney Tom Toogood to operate motor buses in Bristol. In February 1925, it commenced a long-distance coach service between Bristol and London, which has been claimed to be the first long-distance coach service with scheduled stops en route to pick up and set down passengers. In 1928, the company was acquired by Bristol Tramways. Greyhound continued to operate as a separate business, including its bus routes in Bristol until 1936. At the beginning of 1936, the company’s business was absorbed into Bristol Tramways. Bristol Omnibus Company continued to use the Greyhound name for its long-distance coach services until 1972, when the National Bus Company required Bristol to adopt the new National Express brand. In August 2009, FirstGroup who had owned the former Bristol Omnibus Company since April 1988, announced the reintroduction of the Greyhound brand in the United Kingdom. The new Greyhound UK was a byproduct of FirstGroup purchasing the Greyhound Lines business in the United States in February 2007. The badge measures a little over 1½” and has a two loops for a pin. It sold at auction for $307 in 2017. (Photo used by permission of UK eBay member cobcottage.)

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Photo used by permission of eBay member cobcottage.

CAPITOL GREYHOUND LINES The following information is from Wikipedia:”The Capitol Greyhound Lines (GL) came into existence in November 1930, as a joint venture (owned in two equal shares) of the Blue and Gray (B&G) Transit Company and The Greyhound Corporation (with an uppercase T, because the word the was an integral part of the official name of the corporate entity).  Its purpose was to operate a new single main line between Washington, DC, and Saint Louis, Missouri, via Winchester, Virginia, Clarksburg and Parkersburg, both in West Virginia, Chillicothe and Cincinnati, both in Ohio, Bedford and Vincennes, both in Indiana, and Olney and Salem, both in Illinois. . . . In 1954 The Greyhound Corporation, the parent Greyhound firm, bought the 50-percent ownership interest of the Atlantic GL (which part had come from B&G) in the Capitol GL, then Greyhound merged Capitol, along with the old (second) Central GL, into the Pennsylvania GL.

I’ve not seen a badge for this company, but it was one of those that had its own logo on signs and schedules, so there may be a badge out there somewhere.

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CENTRAL GREYHOUND LINES The following is from WikipediaCentral Greyhound Lines is a name used in six different contexts or applications in the intercity highway-coach industry in the USA.  In each of the first five instances, the name was used for a regional operating company (that is, a division or subsidiary) of The Greyhound Corporation, the parent Greyhound firm.  In the last instance the name was used for an internal administrative department of the (second) Greyhound Lines, Inc., the (second) GLI. The names and organizations . . . and the changes in them, especially with regard to the large number of similar and sometimes identical names, are the most confusing and complicated ones in the history of the Greyhound Lines.”

In 1930 The Greyhound Corporation, the parent Greyhound firm, formed two new regional companies – the Pennsylvania Greyhound Lines and the Central Greyhound Lines.

I have seen one Central Greyhound badge at a gun/military show at the L.A. County Fairgrounds back in 1979. Service pins occasionally turn up at auction. Below is a Central Greyhound Lines patch and 14K service pin. To date I have not come across an actual Central Greyhound Lines badge. One long time Greyhound collector claimed that Central Greyhound Lines used a generic Greyhound badge for its drivers.

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Photos courtesy of kygelberhund. (The pin is marked “10k” and “LGB”, which is the trademark for the L.G. Balfour Company  in Attleboro, Mass.)

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DIXIE GREYHOUND LINES was a Greyhound regional operating company based in Memphis, Tennessee, from 1930 until 1954, when it (along with the Teche Greyhound Lines) became merged into the Southeastern Greyhound Lines, a neighboring operating company.

Dixie Greyhound Lines began in 1925 in Memphis, Tennessee as the Smith Motor Coach Company, when James Frederick Smith, a former truck salesman, received a used truck as a gift from his previous employer, John Fisher, who owned the Memphis Motor Company. Smith removed the truck body, built a 12-seat bus body instead on the chassis, and started driving the vehicle himself, first between Memphis and Rosemark, northeast of Millington, in the north end of Shelby County (of which Memphis is the seat), about 25 miles from downtown Memphis to the north-northeast on state road 14 (an alternate route to Brownsville), and soon also between Memphis and Bolivar, about 66 miles to the east on US highway 64, on the way to Chattanooga. By the end of his second year in business, Smith owned and ran 25 coaches; by the end of his third year, he had 60 and had greatly expanded his routes. In 1930 Smith Motor Coach Company became an interstate line, running to Paducah, Kentucky, Evansville, Indiana, and Saint Louis, Missouri; the next year the company ran into Birmingham, Alabama and Jackson, Mississippi. In 1931 The Greyhound Corporation bought a controlling interest in the Smith Motor Coach Company, renamed it as the Dixie Greyhound Lines, and appointed Frederick Smith as the president of the company. Later Fred Smith employed his brother, Earl William Smith, Sr., in the management of Dixie Greyhound Lines. In 1948 Fred Smith suddenly died, and Earl succeeded Fred as the president of Dixie. In October 1954 The Greyhound Corporation merged Dixie and a neighboring regional company, the Teche Greyhound Lines, based in New Orleans, Louisiana, into the Southeastern Greyhound Lines, which was based in Lexington, Kentucky. The three fleets of the three divisions became combined into a single fleet. Thus ended the Dixie Greyhound Lines. (Info from Wikipedia.)

To date the badge below is the only Dixie Greyhound Lines badge known to this website. It is made of nickel and sold for $43 in 2014 at auction. Note it is not of any traditional Greyhound badge design and says “Student Driver”.

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EASTERN GREYHOUND LINES The history of this company is rather complicated, as indeed it is with several other Greyhound companies, since it involves creating holding companies and operating companies “. . . to avoid a hugely increased federal income tax on the undistributed earnings of corporate subsidiaries – one under the Revenue Act of 1936, which the U.S. Congress had passed as a means by which to cause (or force) a simplification of complex corporate structures in the public-utility industries (including the transportation industries).” In 1929, The Greyhound Corporation acquired additional interests in Southland Transportation Company, the Gray Line, and part of the Colonial Motor Coach Company to form Eastern Greyhound Lines. This company was essentially a holding company under which various subsidiaries would be placed. The first of these was the Eastern Greyhound Lines of New York, which was formed in 1930. Next came the Eastern Greyhound Lines of New England. Also in 1930, the Safety Motor Coach Lines was absorbed by Greyhound and renamed Eastern Greyhound Lines of Michigan. And still later Eastern Greyhound Lines of Ohio was formed. In his history of Greyhound, Dr. D.B. “Doc” Rushing writes “In 1935 the main (first) Eastern GL plus three subsidiaries, the EGL of Ohio, the EGL of New York, and the EGL of Michigan, became renamed respectively as the (second) Central GL, the CGL of Ohio, the CGL of New York, and the CGL of Michigan, whereas the EGL of New England (due to its eastern or northeastern location) continued to use its same name.” 

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EASTERN GREYHOUND LINES OF NEW ENGLAND This company is not to be confused with New England Greyhound Lines. The subject of this entry was wholly owned by The Greyhound Corporation, while the latter company was jointly owned by Greyhound and the New York New Haven & Hartford Railroad. Eastern Greyhound Lines of New England, formed in 1930, was a subsidiary of Eastern Greyhound Lines, Inc., which was a holding company. (See the above entry for more information.)

In 1950, when Greyhound acquired full ownership of New England Greyhound Lines, it was combined with Eastern Greyhound Lines of New England.

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ENDERS GREYHOUND LINES was founded by Verne E. Enders (1900-1968) in Benton Harbor, Michigan in 1930 and operated on a lease from The Greyhound Corporation. There is a article in the July 24, 1943, edition of the News-Palladium from Benton Harbor that gives some insight on the operation: “MPSC Grants Local Man Right To Operate To Kalamazoo; Vern Enders, owner of the Enders Greyhound Bus Lines, was declared the winner in the battle over the permit to operate a bus line between St. Joseph and Kalamazoo by the Michigan Public Service commission. The franchise to operate the bus line between the twin cities and Kalamazoo was granted to Enders by the commission after two hearing in Lansing and Detroit. Enders was represented in his fight by Atty. Gordon Van Eenaman, of Muskegon, and Atty. Thomas N. Robinson, of Benton Harbor. The fight over the right to operate the bus line started last month when the Central Greyhound Line, Inc., filed notice that it would terminate its lease with Enders, who has operated the line for the past 13 years. The Central Greyhound Lines and Enders Greyhound Lines each obtained injunctions to restrain each other from operating. Both injunction orders were signed by Circuit Court Commissioner Maurice Weber earlier this month In the absence of Judge Fremont Evans. Later Judge Evans ruled that both injunctions were void because the state law did not permit a circuit court commissioner to sign an injunction and the matter was referred to the state public service commission. Enders’ petition for a hearing on the franchise was set for July 13. The hearings were conducted in both Lansing and Detroit. The commission granted Enders an emergency permit good for 20 days and also a permanent permit for the operation between the twin cities and Kalamazoo. Enders Greyhound Lines also operates between the twin cities and South Bend, Ind.

The above seems to say that Enders Greyhound Lines ceased operations in 1943 after Central Greyhound Lines terminated its lease. However, Verne Enders was allowed to keep the routes, which may be why he founded Enders Bus Lines, Inc. about this time and was essentially running the same route as the former Enders Greyhound Lines. The 1946 MTD entry on Enders Bus Lines notes “successors to Twin City Railway also controls Twin City Motor Coach Company.” In 1946 Enders Bus Lines operated 19 buses over 100 route miles, which included Benton Harbor, Michigan, South Bend, Indianapolis, and Ft. Wayne, Indiana.

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FLORIDA GREYHOUND LINES In January 1926 the firm Stone and Webster bought and consolidated the Florida Motor Transportation Company and White Stage Line Company forming the Florida Motor Lines. Based in Orlando, Florida, the company owned 150 coaches and ran some 1,290 route miles. In January 1946 Florida Motor Lines was sold to The Greyhound Corporation, which renamed it Florida Greyhound Lines. The new Florida Greyhound Lines was the first wholly owned subsidiary of The Greyhound Corporation. In 1957 it was merged into Southeastern Greyhound Lines. The Type 1a badge measures 2 ½ X 2 ½ inches, is inlaid with glass and has two threaded posts. Florida Greyhound Lines badges are another of those early badges that seldom turn up.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member Penn2000.

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GREAT LAKES GREYHOUND LINES This company had it’s start in 1924 in Detroit, Michigan, when the Detroit United Railway Company (DURC), which was an electric interurban rail line, formed the People’s Motor Coach Company. In 1928 the Detroit United Railway Company was reorganized and renamed Eastern Michigan Railways. On September 17, 1928 the People’s Motor Coach Company was incorporated and renamed Eastern Michigan Motorbuses, Inc., and thereafter used the trade name “Blue Goose Lines“, along with the image of a blue goose, for all its intercity routes.

In 1931 the Eastern Michigan Railways went into its second and final bankruptcy and reorganization. In 1936 the company bought out Great Lakes Motor Bus Company, which it then operated as a subsidiary.

Dr. D. B. Rushing writes: “[In] 1938 The Greyhound Corporation, the umbrella Greyhound firm, bought a controlling (majority) interest in the Eastern Michigan Motorbuses under the supervision of the receivers and the court in bankruptcy. However, the federal Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) did not at first allow Greyhound to control the EMM or to merge it into Greyhound, not until 1941, after a change in the membership (the commissioners) of the ICC. Because of the large size of the Eastern Michigan Motorbuses, its route network, and its operations, The Greyhound Corporation created a new subsidiary, named as the Great Lakes Greyhound Lines, which in 1941 took over the EMM. Thus began the Great Lakes Greyhound Lines.

The August 18, 1939, edition of the Times Herald from Port Huron, Michigan, gives a contemporary account of the transaction that preceded the formation of Great Lakes Greyhound Lines: “AP The interstate commerce commission denied authority for Greyhound corporation Thursday to acquire control of Eastern Michigan Motorbusses and its subsidiary, Great Lakes Motor Bus company. The Greyhound corporation proposed to issue 145,000 shares of common stock in exchange for the stock of Eastern Michigan Motorbusses. While denying the Greyhound application, the commission approved a request by Eastern Michigan Motorbusses to absorb Great Lakes Motor Bus company entirely. The commission said its primary concern was whether, after the proposed acquisition by Greyhound, there would remain effective an adequate competition to insure the public the maintenance of high standards of service and reasonable charges. It said there is a close relationship existing between certain Greyhound’s subsidiaries and certain railroads, adding: ‘The effect of acquisition would be to add a fourth Greyhound-controlled bus line operating between Detroit and Toledo, and a second line providing service between Detroit and Kalamazoo, with no organized competition over the latter route between Detroit and Battle Creek, other than one railroad which owns a substantial interest in Central Greyhound. We can conceive of no substantial advantages not presently available, which would acquire to the public under this acquisition. Satisfactory operation and management of Eastern Michigan motorbusses and its subsidiary Great Lakes are indicated by their respective records of earnings, and we, therefore, entertain no apprehension that disapproval of the application would involve any impairment of the earning capacity or ability of the mentioned carriers to provide efficient service in the future.

In 1957 Great Lakes Greyhound Lines merged with Northland Greyhound Lines, a neighboring operating company, and formed the Central Division of The Greyhound Corporation (the parent Greyhound firm). As to a badges, this is probably another Greyhound company that used a generic Greyhound badge for its drivers.

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THE GREYHOUND LINES The Greyhound Corporation did produce a standard badge in the Type 1, Type 3 and Type 4 designs. These were used by various operating companies. Below is a WWII era photo of a driver writing what appears to be a bus ticket for a soldier. An enlargement of his hat badge clearly shows the badge to be a Type 1 design. In the second photo is a Type 1 badge with two threaded posts, marked MAIER-LAVATY CO. CHICAGO and measures 2 ½ X 2 ½ inches. Even though the enameling is badly damaged, the red and blue colors differ from the photo in the Library of Congress photo. The third photo is of a Type 3a design.

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Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress collection.
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This is a Type 1 heavy brass badge with cloisonné enamel coloring inlay. It measures approximately 2 ½ x 2 ½ inches, has two threaded posts and was made by Maier-Lavaty. This particular example is in bad condition with most of the glass inlay missing. Its red and blue coloring differs from the Library of Congress photo shown above. (Photos courtesy of eBay member usnwahoo84.)
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Type 3a badge. Photo courtesy of kygelberhund.

GREYHOUND Keith Schneider of Gasoline Alley Antiques, Seattle, Washington, believes this is a saleman’s sample. I would say that is a very good guess, except technically it would be a prototype made by a badge company as an example of a proposed design. Whatever the backstory, to my knowledge it was never used by The Greyhound Corporation and is perhaps a unique badge. The badge measures 2 ⅛” x 1½”, is made in oval shaped aluminum with pin & clasp and is marked “Whitehead-Hoag”. (NOTE: it is hard to date this example. Whitehead-Hoag was in business throughout the 1900s and when it was sold to Bastian Brothers in 1959, that company continued using the name until 1964-65.)

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Photos courtesy of Gasoline Alley Antiques, Seattle, Wa.

GREYHOUND LINES OF CANADA In 1929, Greyhound Canada was founded as Canadian Greyhound Coaches, Limited, operating first in BC and then Alberta. It merged with Greyhound USA in 1935 and split after Greyhound Canada was sold in 1987. It was not until U.S.-based Laidlaw’s purchase of the Canadian operations in 1987 and U.S. operations in 1999 did the two operations link up again.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member saskmjoh.

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THE GREYHOUND LINES, INC. OF DELAWARE  No information on this company, other than this from Wikipedia: “For a short time during 1927–28, there was also a third subsidiary (of the MTC) using the name of the Greyhound Lines, Inc. – the GLI of Delaware, which came into existence to buy the Purple Swan Safety Coach Lines, running between Chicago and Kansas City via Saint Louis (the two latter in Missouri), and which became renamed as the Pickwick-Greyhound Lines, after the Pickwick Corporation bought a one-half ownership interest in that firm (hence the hyphenated name).

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THE GREYHOUND LINES OF GEORGIA, INC. First let me explain that this company doesn’t appear to have any business connection to THE GREYHOUND LINES OF GEORGIA, other than both being part of The Greyhound Corporation.

According to David Steinburg’s history of Chattanooga, Tennessee, bus companies, Dixie Safety Coach Line, Inc. was founded in the 1920s by Captain Gordon Roper of Atlanta, Georgia. Advertised as the “Peach Belt Line”, the company originally ran between Atlanta, Macon and Griffin, Georgia. It would later add Chattanooga, Tennessee, to its schedule.  In 1928 it was sold to the Motor Coach Corporation, which renamed the company Greyhound Lines of Georgia. (Motor Coach Corporation was renamed The Greyhound Corporation in 1929.) The Greyhound Corporation changed Greyhound Lines of Georgia’s name to the Southeastern Greyhound Lines in 1931 to reflect the company’s southern and eastern expansions. That same year the Consolidated Coach Corporation acquired Southeastern Greyhound Line and used it to acquire the Florida Greyhound Lines, which was originally called the Florida Motor Lines. Consolidated Coach Corporation continued to operated the company under the name “Southeastern Greyhound Lines.” (Indeed, Consolidated Coach Corp. used the name for all their buses, including the use of the Greyhound running dog logo, paint scheme and advertising. However, under the name “Southeastern Greyhound Lines” on their buses and advertising, they included “Consolidated Coach Corp.” in small letters.) In 1950 The Greyhound Corporation purchased 100% of Southeastern Greyhound Lines.

There is a slightly different version of the company’s history, as related in a September 10, 1931, Associated Press article found in numerous newspapers of the day:

“(AP) C. C. C. Line Changed to ‘Southeastern Greyhound’ Atlanta, Ga., Sept 10 [1931] J. P. Pope, vice-president of the Southeastern Greyhound lines, announced today that all lines of the Consolidated Coach Corporation, recently acquired by the former company and operating in Kentucky, Georgia, Alabama and Tennessee, will be operated under the system name of ‘Southeastern Greyhound Lines.’ The System operated out of Lexington, Ky. and covers routes totally 5,222 miles.”

Within a week of the above, countless ads appeared with this information:

“SEPTEMBER FIFTEENTH will be a red letter day in the history of Southern- transportation. The South’s largest bus lines, The Consolidated Coach Corporation, Inc., Southeastern Greyhound Lines, Inc Union Transfer Company, Inc, and Alabama Bus Company, Inc will operate under ONE great name. Southeastern Greyhound Lines, offering through service from the Ohio to Florida and the Gulf, will give you all the advantages of being able to go almost anywhere in the Southeast over one great transportation system . . . better service, greater dependability and the height of travel comfort. Southeastern Greyhound Lines will offer frequent service to point In Kentucky, Tennessee, Ohio, Georgia, Alabama and Florida, bringing the favorite vacation spots to your very door … the Blue Grass country . . . the mountains … the lake resorts . . . and the Gulf of Mexico. The combined Greyhound Lines serve 47 of the 48 states of the Union, part of Canada and Old Mexico. From COAST TO COAST BORDER TO BORDER, you need not change lines. A single high standard of service gives you everything you could wish in modern motor bus travel. Ask your nearest agent for the fare and schedule to your favorite resort, learn how surprisingly low the cost is by motor coach.”

No information on badges. (Click here for a detailed history of Consolidated Coach Corporation.)

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THE GREYHOUND LINES SECURITY This badge is marked “O. F. CHIEF OF SECURITY” and is made of sterling silver. I’ve no information about its origin, but it was probably used in a large Greyhound terminal, such as New York City, or Chicago. It has a swivel clasp and pin, and looks to date from the late 1930s-1940. It measures 2¼” x 1½”.

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Photos courtesy of R. B. Jackson.

THE GREYHOUND LINES STATION / TERMINAL BADGE When one thinks of a Greyhound badge, a bus driver’s hat badge immediately comes to mind. However, The Greyhound Lines made badges for other reasons. There are the Red Cap badges, which are listed on this page, and there were badges used for decoration/identification at Greyhound bus terminals / stations. These badges, which are designated as Type 00a were mounted on the top portion of the heavy brass escutcheon onto which was mounted a door handle, which was mounted on a door leading into a Greyhound bus terminal. These appeared in the early to late 1930s and were a feature on terminals designed and built by Greyhound. A photo of this exact badge is reproduced on page 37 of Alex Roggero’s Greyhound A Pictorial Tribute to an American Icon, and was featured on the doors of the classic Art-Deco Evansville, Indiana, Greyhound station, which was opened in 1938. The badge shown here was never used and still has a rough top edge where it was separated from the runner after casting. There are two short posts on the back; how these posts were used for fastening is open to question. My best guess is that they were used like a rivet, which a ball peen hammer and a rivet set could firmly secure the badge to the back of the escutcheon. I considered that the posts could be drilled out and threaded, thereby allowing a set screw to secure the badge, but the circumference of the posts seems to rule out that possibility. The interesting feature of this badge is being almost exactly the size of the early Greyhound Red Cap badges—2″ x 1¾”—and it is very similar in design to all Greyhound badges of this era. The badge is thicker than an ordinary badge, about 3mm thick. The features are cast in very high relief, which is not the case with drivers badges. Something that stands out is the number S11055 cast into the backside of the badge, which is likely a part number. A later number, S3836, was inked under the cast number. (Later examples of this badge don’t have the numbers cast into the badge, but were stamped into the back.)  (NOTE: I’ll insert a personal note here: Over the decades I have visited a number of old, classic Greyhound stations throughout the USA, and several of these still had entrance doors with brass door escutcheon plates featuring these badges mounted above the handles. The one station I visited most often was the classic blue Greyhound station in Evansville, Indiana, which, beginning in the 1950s, I visited at least 100 times. With the exception of the Evansville station, which is now a restaurant, most of these Greyhound stations have been torn down, making these door badges scarce.)

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All photos courtesy of TRANSITBADGES.COM.
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A later example of a terminal badge with the numbers stamped into the metal, instead of being cast.

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Above right, the classic Art-Deco Evansville, Indiana, Greyhound bus station near the end of its life as a functional Greyhound depot. Left, a souvenir linen postcard of the station during its early years. The station was built in 1938 at a cost of $150,000. It was designed by architect William Strudwick Arrasmith who designed numerous other Greyhound depots in the U.S. The station ceased operating in 2007.

GREYHOUND SUPER SCENICRUISER DRIVER This an embroidered cloth badge that is rarely encountered. Obviously it was used for Super Scenicruiser drivers only.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member smithsrustyrelics.

GREYHOUND VAN LINES, INC. I hesitate to include this company, since this webpage is dedicated to collecting badges of passenger transportation companies. True, the parent of Greyhound Van Lines, Inc. was The Greyhound Corporation, which controlled Greyhound Lines, Inc., but Greyhound Van Lines’ sole business was the transportation of goods with the exclusion of passengers. The reason I’ve decided to include this company here is because I’ve had several inquiries about its badges, which includes one example that is almost identical to a badge issued by Greyhound Lines, Inc. to its bus drivers.

To start, there’s not much info out there on the founding of this company. From John Hess’ book The Mobile Society: A History of the Moving & Storage Industry (New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1973), we learn that Greyhound Van Lines was already a major moving company during the Great Depression and was in competition with Allied Van Lines and Mayflower Transit, LLC. and Mayflower Transit, LLC. A surviving cardboard sign from the era depicts an early 1930s model Greyhound moving van with a sign on the side that reads “Long Distance Movers Offices in All Principle Cities—Agents Everywhere“. These bits of information show that Greyhound Van Lines was founded early in the history of The Greyhound Corporation. Indeed, from the beginning the moving company was controlled by Greyhound presidents, Carl E. Wickman and, after his retirement, Orville S. Caesar. It’s also interesting to note that Greyhound Van Lines capitalized on the fame of its sister company, Greyhound Lines, by using that company’s running dog logo and painting its moving trucks with the blue and white livery of a Greyhound bus. In fact, by the 1960s Greyhound Van Lines was using a variation of Greyhound’s logo “Take the Bus and Leave the Driving to Us” in their advertising, which they re-packaged as “Leave the Moving to Us”.

Absent any written history, we can reasonably speculate why Greyhound went into the long distance moving business. Allied Van Lines was founded in 1928 and soon became a major money-making venture. The same was true with Mayflower Transit, LLC, which was founded in 1927. These were the days when many bus companies started off as a freight company, and only added passengers service as an afterthought. That usually took the form of installing benches in the beds of freight trucks for anyone who might want to pay to ride along surrounded by boxes of freight—and in some cases, farm animals. In numerous cases the freight company owners quickly discovered that moving passengers instead of freight was more lucrative and far less trouble. On the other side of the coin, numerous early bus companies discovered that there was good money in carrying both passengers and freight. We my speculate that this was likely the origin of Greyhound Van Lines, i.e., Greyhound’s buses were moving passengers, so why not create a separate service to move those passengers’ goods?

As noted, there is little in the way of history for Greyhound Van Lines, aside from decades of advertising in magazines and newspapers. That the company was highly successful can be noted in a February 1973 transaction when the company was sold to the Golden Cycle Corporation. A newspaper notice at the time gives some background: “Greyhound Van Lines . . . is a major interstate mover of household goods operating in 49 states. Golden Cycle also is involved in the moving of household goods through a subsidiary, Smyth Worldwide Movers, Inc. Combined annual sales of Smyth and Greyhound Van Lines would be in excess of $50-million. Golden Cycle is also engaged in oil and gas exploration and real estate development.

As to the badges of Greyhound Van Lines, there are several known examples. The first is a polished nickel-plated example with two threaded posts. Most of these were made by HOOKFAST PROVIDENCE R.I. The next example is almost identical to the TYPE 5 Greyhound badge, which is a large heavy brass badge painted blue. It measures approximately 2″ x 2½” and dates from the 1960s. Some examples are marked “LGB”, while others are unmarked. (LGB stands for Lloyd Garfield “Bally” Balfour, who founded the L.G. Balfour Company in 1913.)

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A magazine ad from the early 1960s.

H. & C. GREYHOUND TAXI COMPANY First of all, let’s be clear: this badge doesn’t belong on this page—in fact, it doesn’t belong on this web page. I include it here because it has been confused with a Greyhound Lines badge. This company has no connection to The Greyhound Corporation. It seems quite obvious that company owners, Carl F. Morlath and Toney Corey, wished to capitalize on the fame of the Greyhound bus name and the running dog logo. Based in Sacramento, California, in 1944 it was located at 215 Kay Street, and by 1960 on 227 L Street. (There is a photo of the company offices in the Center for Sacramento History.) The badge is made of nickel-plated metal, has two threaded posts, and measures 2½” x 2 ⅛”.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member camarowannabe.

ILLINOIS GREYHOUND LINES According to information on the Chicago Transit & Railfan website and Wikepedia, this company’s origins starts with the incorporation in 1924 with Purple Swan Safety Coach Lines. In 1927-1928 Motor Transit Corporation created a subsidiary named the Greyhound Lines, Inc. of Delaware, which came into existence to buy the Purple Swan Safety Coach Lines, running between Chicago and Kansas City via Saint Louis. In 1928 the company was renamed Illinois Greyhound Lines.

In 1931 [IGL] acquired routes from Tri-State Bus Co. (TSB), which was incorporated in 1927. Tri-State Bus Co. in 1929 had acquired Alton Transportation Co., which in 1926 acquired Gadberry Transportation Co. and Ritter Motor Bus Co. In 1936 [IGL] acquired most routes of White Star Motor Lines (WSM), which was formed in 1925 out of a merger of Peoria Farmington Coach Line and Peoria White Star Bus Co. In 1947 [IGL] acquired Black Hawk Motor Transit Co. (BHK), which was incorporated in 1924. [IGL was consolidated] 1955 into Great Lakes Greyhound Lines, [which was] consolidated 1957 into Central Division of Greyhound.

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ILLINOIS EASTERN GREYHOUND I have no information on this operating company other an a few mentions in books and newspapers from the late 1930s until the late 1950s. Hence, I have no idea if there are badges out there bearing this name.

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MAINE GREYHOUND LINES, INC. On April 8, 1955, Greyhound Lines acquired all the capital stock of the Maine Central Transportation Co., Inc. and created a new division known as Maine Greyhound Lines, Inc. However, Greyhound continued to operate buses under the Maine Central Transportation Company name, which, in 1956, was cited as the largest intrastate bus operator in the state of Maine. If anyone has more information on this company, please let me know.

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MESABA TRANSPORTATION COMPANY Carl Eric Wickman (1887-1954) “. . . worked in a mine as a drill operator in Hibbing, Minnesota until he was laid off in 1914. In the same year, Wickman became a Hupmobile salesman as a partnership-owner. When he could not sell the first Hupmobile he received, he began operating a livery route from Hibbing and Alice, Minnesota. By using the seven multi-seat Hupmobile, he drove his former colleagues between the mines and homes. This was the start of what would later become the largest bus line in the United States, The Greyhound Corporation.” (From the Wikipedia article “Eric Wickman”.) A short time later Wickman joined Andrew G. Anderson and C.A.A. Heed, and formed a small transportation business serving the Iron Range country of Minnesota. Soon they joined with Ralph Bogan, a competitor, to form the Hibbing Transportation Company. In December 17, 1915, this group formed a new corporation named Mesaba Transportation Company. By 1917 the company was operating a fleet of 17 buses and was serving Grand Rapids, Michigan. Skipping over a lot of history, we move to September 20, 1926, when Carl Eric Wickman and his partners formed the Motor Transit Corporation (MTC), which in 1929/1930 was renamed The Greyhound Corporation. (For more details, see the entry for Northland Greyhound Lines and Wickman’s role in founding that company.) 

From volume III of the book, Duluth and St. Louis County Minnesota Their Story and People (van Brunt, Walter, editor, 1921. Chicago and New York: The American Historical Society), we find the following information, which is significant since this was written at a time when the subjects were still alive and running their first big public transit enterprise: Carl Erich Wickman was born in Sweden on August 7, 1887; Carl A. A. Heed, born in Sweden on June 25, 1886, P; Andrew G. Anderson, born in Sweden on January 4, 1882; Edwin C. Ekstrom, born in Michigan on March 19, 1889. “In the latter part of 1914 three men, C. E. Wickman, Andrew G. Anderson and Carl A. A. Heed established a service with a Hupmobile seven-passenger touring car as a bus making regular trips for the accomodation of passengers between Hibbing (now South Hibbling) and Alice. . . . On January 1, 1916, the Mesaba Transportation Company was organized by the three enterprising young business men just mentioned. They incorporated with a capital of twenty-five thousand dollars. . . . The first president of Mesaba Transportation Company was J. F. Lindberg, while C. A. A. Heed was vice president, C. E. Wickman general manager and secretary, and Andrew G. Anderson, treasurer. . . . and the other member of the board of five directors is R. A. L. Bogan, who had been connected with the corporation from the beginning.” On January 1, 1920, a subsidiary corporation known as the Mesaba Motor Company was organized to supply vehicles and maintenance.

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L-R: Carl Wickman, Andrew G. Anderson and Carl A. A. Heed, the three partners whose business ventures would lead to the founding of The Greyhound Corporation. (From the book, Duluth and St. Louis County Minnesota Their Story and People. Van Brunt, Walter [1921] Duluth: American Historical Society. )
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An early Greyhound uniform button. (Photo Courtesy of kygelberhund.)

NEW ENGLAND GREYHOUND LINES, INC. This company is not to be confused with Eastern Greyhound Lines of New England. The latter company was wholly owned by The Greyhound Corporation, while the subject of this entry was jointly owned by Greyhound and the New York New Haven & Hartford Railroad. The New York New Haven & Hartford Railroad owned the New England Transportation Co. and other bus companies, which became part of New England Greyhound Lines when the railroad acquired a half interest in the Greyhound company.

In his history of Greyhound, Dr. D.B. “Doc” Rushing writes: “[In] 1937 The Greyhound Corporation (with an uppercase T, because the word the was an integral part of the official name of the corporate entity), the original parent Greyhound firm, formed the New England Greyhound Lines (GL), as a subsidiary.  The purpose of the new firm was to take over three routes of the New England Transportation (NET) Company plus two subsidiaries of the NET Company – the Berkshire Motor Coach Lines and the Victoria Coach Lines, two discount-price carriers which NET had previously bought (not later than 1932) – along with two other unrelated firms, the Quaker Stages and the Old Colony Coach Lines. The NET Company was the bus subsidiary of the New York, New Haven, and Hartford (NYNH&H) Railroad, commonly known as the New Haven Railroad. The railway firm acquired a one-half interest in the New England GL. . . . In the few years after the 1937 formation of New England Greyhound Lines, certain routes were transferred so that New England Greyhound Lines operated the routes south of Boston, while Eastern Greyhound Lines of New England operated the routes north of Boston. And in 1950 when Greyhound acquired full ownership of New England Greyhound Lines, the two companies were combined.

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A New England Greyhound Lines 5-Year service pin in 10k. (Photo courtesy of kygelberhund.)

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NORTHEASTERN MISSOURI GREYHOUND LINES, INC. / NORTHEASTERN MISSOURI LINES, INC. / C & H TRANSIT INC. Northeastern Missouri Lines, Inc. was incorporated on June 25, 1946, in Missouri with John E. Evans as the registered agent and a company director. The July 10, 1947, edition of the Mexico Ledger from Mexico, Missouri, reported: “Northeastern Missouri Greyhound Lines, Inc., was formed here with Robert H. Finley and W. Wallace Fry as local officers.” Northeastern Greyhound Lines commenced service on June 1, 1948, serving Hannibal, Mexico, Fulton and Jefferson City, Missouri with 6 buses running 222 route miles. In June 1948 P. W. Tibbetts was the company president with Robert H. Finley as vice president. In 1954 E. F. Freeman was the company president and Robert H. Finley was vice president. (Finley also owned and operated Finley Bus Line in Mexico, Missouri, and he was the co-owner of Finley-Shotwell Bus Line, which operated out of Kansas City, Missouri.) In 1956 Northeastern Greyhound Lines appears to have disconnected from The Greyhound Corporation since it reverted to its original name: Northeastern Missouri Lines. That company operated until July 6, 1972, at which time its operating authority was transferred to C & H Transit Incorporated. The badge is nickel plated with blue enamel paint, measures 2 ½” x 2 ⅝”, has one threaded post and one pin post.

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1948 ads from the Mexico Ledger in Mexico, Missouri.
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Photos used by permission of eBay member Penn2000.

NORTH COAST GREYHOUND LINES, INC. / NORTH COAST TRANSPORTATION COMPANY The Tuesday, October 26, 1948, edItion of the Corvallis Gazette-Times, from Corvallis, Oregon, gives the background on this Greyhound company:

“North Coast Merges With Greyhound Lines SEATTLE, Oct. 26 (AP) Consolidation of the North Coast Transportation company with the Greyhound Lines was being effected today. Sale of North Coast, which has been operating inter-city bus lines from Portland, Ore., to Vancouver, B. C, through Seattle, was approved recently by the interstate commerce commission. Orville S. Caeser, president of the Greyhound corporation, said the newly-acquired lines will be maintained as a separate operating company in the Greyhound system. It will be known as the North Coast Greyhound Lines, with Clifford E. Graves, Seattle, as president. Greyhound plans to retain North Coast’s 643 operating employes, he said, and will add to the 165 buses operated over the North Coast’s 620 route lines to provide limited and express runs and other improvements.”

In 1950 North Coast Greyhound Lines, Inc., merged with Northwest Greyhound Lines, Inc. As to badges, one collector maintains that North Coast Greyhound drivers continued to use their old North Coast Transportation badges and that Greyhound badges were never issued. The cloisonne badge shown below is made of brass with a single threaded post, and measures 2″ in diameter. It is considered a rarity among badge collectors. (For more information see North Coast Lines / North Coast Transportation at the bottom of this page.)

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Photo used by permission of eBay member iconrelicsaz.

NORTHWEST GREYHOUND LINES, INC. / WASHINGTON MOTOR COACH SYSTEM Washington Motor Coach System was formed in 1925 by combining the certificates of a number of smaller companies. In January 1938 WMCS significantly expanded when it merged with the Yakima Motor Coach Company, Inc., the Olympic Motor Coach Company, Inc., and the Spokane-Butte Motor Coach Company, Inc., faithfully serving Washington, Idaho and Montana. On Tuesday, February 25, 1947, The Greyhound Corporation announced it had acquired control of the Washington Motor Coach System, which was then operating in four Pacific northwest states. Greyhound president Orville S. Caesar announced that 96 per cent of WMCS’ outstanding stock was purchased. At the acquisition the name of the company was changed from Washington Motor Coach System to Northwest Greyhound Lines, Inc., with Clifford E. Graves serving as president. The purchase also included WMCS’s depot located at 8th and Stewart Streets in Seattle. WMCS’s drivers, managers and other staff became part of Greyhound. In 1950 North Coast Greyhound Lines, Inc., merged with Northwest Greyhound Lines, Inc., and the former company ceased to exist. On June 1, 1957, Pacific Greyhound Lines merged with Northwest Greyhound Lines and a segment of Overland Greyhound Lines to form Western Greyhound Lines. (See Washington Motor Coach System at the bottom of this page for more information.)

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NORTHLAND GREYHOUND LINES, INC. / NORTHLAND TRANSPORTATION COMPANY Northland Greyhound Lines was one of the first of the many Greyhound operating companies to be formed. As noted elsewhere on this page, Carl Eric Wickman, along with several partners, formed the Hibbing Transportation Company in the Iron Range country of Minnesota. On December 17, 1915, they incorporated as the Mesaba Transportation Company, with Wickman serving as president. On December 20, 1924, Carl Eric Wickman, along with some investors, incorporated a new company, Northland Transportation Company, and shortly thereafter this new company purchased Mesaba Motor Company. Greyhound historian Margaret Walsh writes:

“The most important acquisition of personnel took place when the Northland acquired the Superior-White Company and its major entrepreneur, Orville S. Caesar. Caesar’s mechanical skills, business acumen, and ambition would eventually lead him to the presidency of the Greyhound Corporation. . . . 

“In an attempt to curb motor-coach competition, several major railroads cut their fares and agitated for more stringent regulations and higher taxation of road vehicles. Other companies, taking a more positive and constructive position, accepted the economic facts that motor coaches offered advantages of greater flexibility and cheaper running costs, especially for short-and intermediate-haul traffic, and decided to use buses as auxiliaries to or even in lieu of some trains. . . . In Minnesota, the Great Northern [Railroad], under its forward-looking president, Ralph Budd, was one of these railroads. In May, 1925, after much discussion and analysis of the problems and possibilities of a rate war with competing bus lines, Budd organized two subsidiary companies, capitalized at $2,000,000, to carry passengers and freight. While the Minnesota Railroad and Warehouse Commission was still considering whether to grant these companies certificates of convenience and necessity, the Great Northern management abandoned its plans to establish new motor companies in favor of buying into the major existing independent firm, the Northland [Transportation Company]. Now Budd, Wickman, and Caesar used railroad capital and tapped new outside sources of finance to weld together a $2,500,000 merger of eight independent lines, creating a huge operation dominating the region north and west of the Twin Cities of St. Paul and Minneapolis. By the end of 1925 the Northland Transportation Company ran some 150 buses operating over 2,625 miles of rural route, and it dominated motor transport in those parts of Minnesota served by the Great Northern.” (TRACING the HOUND The Minnesota Roots of The Greyhound Bus Corporation by Margaret Walsh.)

It was around the time of Great Northern Railway’s merger with the Northland Transportation Company that the latter company adopted it bull moose logo. Concerning that logo, one researcher writes that it was “suspiciously reminiscent of Great Northern’s Rocky Mountain goat logo, a version of which had been adopted by the railway in 1925.” When putting all the pieces together, it certainly seems logical to deduce that the bull moose logo was a counterpart to Great Northern’s rocky mountain goat logo! At any rate, this bull moose logo can be seen on surviving Northland Greyhound Lines station signs, time tables and the company’s first drivers badges.

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Great Northern Railways’ part ownership of Northland Transportation Company / Northland Greyhound Lines, may have played a role in the design of Northland Greyhound’s choice of its company logo, which is suspiciously like that of Great Northern.
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A Northland Greyhound Lines schedule from February-March 1931 showing its bull moose logo. In time this logo would be replaced by the familiar running greyhound dog logo of The Greyhound Corporation.
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An original Northland Greyhound Lines porcelain station sign.

Skipping over a lot of history, including numerous buy outs and mergers, in 1926 all of Wickman and associates’ efforts thus far would be incorporated as the Motor Transit Corporation, which, in 1929, would be renamed The Greyhound Corporation, represented by its famous running greyhound dog logo. (An excellent source of history, if one is interested in all the jumble of buy outs and mergers, is the January-March 2001 issue of Motor Coach Age, which dedicates almost the entire issue to Northland Greyhound’s history.)

In 1929, stimulated by the prospect of a national bus service, The Greyhound Corporation started to buy substantial minority interests in bus companies and their subsidiaries in other parts of the United States. Margaret Walsh writes:

“First purchasing the companies of the Pioneer Yelloway System (a large regional network whose owner, Wesley E. Travis, had inaugurated the first transcontinental bus service). Greyhound then set up a new company, Pacific Greyhound, on the west coast. In the South, Greyhound acquired an interest in the Southland Transportation Company and in the East purchased the Gray Line and part of the Colonial Motor Coach Company to form Eastern Greyhound Lines. In the north. Greyhound bought into the Northland Transportation Company, which was then reorganized as Northland Greyhound Lines. The Great Northern Railway took, as part payment of its stock, a 30 percent interest in the common stock of Northland Greyhound.”

The July 6, 1929, issue of Railway Age, article “Great Northern Transfers Control of Northland Transportation Company”, reported:

“Control of the Northland Transportation Company has been sold by the Great Northern Railway to the Motor Transit Corporation and Automotive Investments, Inc., organizations affiliated with the coast-to-coast motor coach system of the Greyhound Lines. The property will be operated under the name of Northland Greyhound Lines. . . . In announcing the sale of the property, Ralph Budd, president of the Great Northern, said the railway will keep a large minority interest in the motor coach company and will be represented on its board of directors. In conformity with the national policy of the Greyhound system, the Northland.”

And so, Northland Greyhound Lines was officially born in 1929, although Northland Transportation Company continued as a legal entity. Important to our history of Northland Greyhound’s driver badges, 1929 was the year that Northland Greyhound retooled their old Northland Transportation Company badges to include the name “GREYHOUND” in the title. Some three or four years after that, the company produces newly-designed driver badges that included the famous running greyhound logo. 

Page 22 of the Tuesday, November 17, 1936, edition of The Evening News, from Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, gives the next chapter in Northland Greyhound Lines’ history:

“GREYHOUND TO MERGE 19 OF ITS BUS LINES Seeks Permission Of I. C. C. ‘To Simplify Corporate Structure’ FORMS PENNA. GROUP Washington. Nov. 17. The Greyhound System of motor carriers applied to the Interstate Commerce Commission today for permission to merge 19 of its subsidiaries into six consolidated companies ‘to simplify the corporate structure of the system.’

“At the same time, Southeastern Greyhound Lines, of Lexington, Ky., applied for authority to issue a series of new security offerings to retire outstanding indebtedness. . The proposed merger will become effective December 31, if approved by the commission.

“The following suggested mergers were listed:

“1. Atlantic Greyhound Corp., ; Atlantic Greyhound Lines of Vir-I ginia, East Coast Stages. Inc., and Safeway Transit Co., Inc., into the Atlantic Greyhound Corp, with offices at Charleston, W. Va.

“2. Southwestern Greyhound Lines, Inc.; Gold Eagle Southern Lines, Inc., to be merged into Southwestern Greyhound Lines, Inc., with offices at Fort Worth, Tex.

“3. Pennsylvania Greyhound Lines, Inc., of Delaware; Pennsylvania Greyhound Lines of Indiana, Inc.; Peoples Rapid Transit Company, Inc.; Pennsylvania Greyhound Lines of Illinois, Inc.; Pennsylvania Greyhound Transit Co, merged into Pennsylvania Greyhound Lines, Inc., of Delaware, with offices at Cleveland, O.

“4. Central Greyhound Lines, Inc., of Delaware, Central Greyhound Lines. Inc.. of New York; Central Greyhound Lines. Inc., of Delaware, with offices at Cleveland.

“5. Northland Greyhound Lines, Inc., and Northland-Greyhound Lines, Inc.. of Illinois, into Northland Greyhound- Lines, Inc., with offices at Minneapolis.

“6. Capital Greyhound Lines of Virginia and Capital Greyhound Lines, Inc., of Indiana, into Capital Greyhound Lines of Virginia, with offices at Cincinnati, O.”

In 1939 the company operated over a network of routes in Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan and Illinois. Over the coming years the company continued buying out its competition, an example being in January 1940 when it bought Wisconsin River Valley Transportation Company, and in March 1948 when it bought Kenosha Motor Coach Lines, Inc., of Wisconsin.

The next major event in Northland Greyhound Lines’ history is noted by Greyhound historian, Dr. D. B. “Doc” Rushing:

“In September 1957, in another round of consolidation, The Greyhound Corporation further merged the Great Lakes GL with – not into but rather with – the Northland GL (called also Northland or NGL), a neighboring regional operating company – thereby forming the Central Division of The Greyhound Corporation (called also the Central GL, making the fifth of six uses of that name), the second of four huge new divisions (along with Eastern, Southern, and Western). . . . The Northland GL had reached as far north as Sweetgrass, Montana (in Montana) and Winnipeg, Manitoba, as far east as Saint Ignace, Michigan, Milwaukee (in Wisconsin), and Chicago (in Illinois), as far to the south as Chicago (in Illinois), Dubuque (in Iowa), and Omaha (in Nebraska), and as far to the west as Sweetgrass, Great Falls, Helena, and Butte, Montana; it had met (to the west) the Northwestern GL, (to the north) the Western Canadian GL and the Eastern Canadian GL, (to the east and south) the Great Lakes GL and the (second) Eastern GL (formerly the second Central GL and the Pennsylvania GL), and (to the south) the Overland GL.”

The name Northland Greyhound Lines, Inc., was still in use into the 1960s, notably in several newspaper accounts. Page 76 of the Tuesday, June 30, 1964, edition of The Bismarck Tribune, from Bismarck, North Dakota, reported that “Northland Greyhound Lines, Inc., which years ago served most major communities, now has only two routes, from Fargo west to Montana and north on U.S. 81 to Winnipeg. In 1950 Greyhound began selling feeder routes to local operators.”

Page 14 of the Thursday, October 26, 1967, of The Lake Geneva Regional News, from Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, reported: “On Tuesday morning, Nov. 8, the state Public Service commission will hold a public hearing on a proposal of Northland Greyhound Lines, Inc., of Minneapolis, Minn., to reduce its schedule of bus operations on the Lake Geneva-Milwaukee-Burlington route.

By the late 1960s the name Northland Greyhound Lines, Inc., had disappeared from view.

(To read Margaret Walsh’s detailed and very interesting history of The Greyhound Corporation, click on this link: TRACING the HOUND: The Minnesota Roots of The Greyhound Bus Corporation, which was published in the Minnesota Historical Society’s Minnesota History Magazine in Winter/1985.)

There are four Greyhound badges known for Northland Greyhound Lines, Inc.

The earliest badge was originally made for Northland Transportation Company, which dates it to at least the mid-1920s. Made of die pressed aluminum, it measures approx. 4¼” x 2¼” and is styled after the convex-shaped railroad/streetcar company badges, which fit a traditional rounded conductor hat. The badge features a bull moose logo. In 1929, when the company was renamed Northland Greyhound Lines, their badges were retooled by having a die pressed name plate produced with the name “GREYHOUND” and having that riveted over the name “TRANSPORTATION COMPANY”. And so, the badge shown below dates to the mid 1920s, while the “retooling” to a Greyhound badge updates it to 1929, or the year Northland Greyhound Lines was born. It is important to note that this badge, unlike the many other Greyhound badges out there, has a direct connection to Greyhound founder, Carl Eric Wickman, sine he was personally involved with Northland Transportation Company and Northland Greyhound Lines. In any event, this example is perhaps the rarest of all Greyhound badges!

The second Northland Greyhound Lines badge dates from circa 1933 on into the late 1930s; it is a TYPE 1b badge with two threaded posts, marked MAIER-LAVATY CO. CHICAGO and measures 2 ½ X 2 ½ inches. The third badge is a TYPE 1d, which is is similar to Type 1c, but the bus image is a full side view of a 1940s bus and is not engraved into the badge, nor is the running greyhound image. There are no markings on the reverse. The fourth badge is a TYPE 4 and is marked “NGL”. (Note: The first, third and fourth badges shown below belonged to Gustav Rudolph Fredrickson (April 6, 1901—August 11, 1978), who drove for Northland Greyhound Lines beginning in the late 1920s until 1963, when he retired.)

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A pre-Northland Greyhound Lines brass baggage claim.
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The above badge belonged to former Northland Greyhound Lines driver Gustav Rudolph Fredrickson. Photos used by permission of Dr. Dixie Klein. To the right is an original Northland Greyhound Lines porcelain sign.
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Above, a Type 1a badge (NOTE: there is some damage to the surface enamel to the right of the Greyhound/bus emblems); below, Type 1b badge. Photos courtesy of kygelberhund.

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The above badge belonged to former Northland Greyhound Lines driver Gustav Rudolph Fredrickson. Photos used by permission of Dr. Dixie Klein.
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The above badge belonged to former Northland Greyhound Lines driver Gustav Rudolph Fredrickson. Photos used by permission of Dr. Dixie Klein.
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The above service pin belonged to former Northland Greyhound Lines driver Gustav Rudolph Fredrickson. Photos used by permission of Dr. Dixie Klein.

NORTHLAND GREYHOUND LINES, INC., OF ILLINOIS Essentially this company was one and the same as the above Northland Greyhound Lines, Inc. The latter company was owned and controlled by The Greyhound Corporation and the Great Northern Railway through its holding company, Northland Transportation Company. Northland Greyhound Lines, Inc., of Illinois was also owned and controlled by both The Greyhound Corporation and Great Northern Railway. The tangle of legalese is somewhat laid out in a December 29, 1933, decision of the Public Service Commission of Wisconsin:

“Application by Northland Transportation Company for authority to assign its certificate as an interstate common carrier of passengers between points and over routes specified, to the Northland Greyhound Lines, Inc., of Illinois, granted, the Commission finding that the proposal is in the public interest.

The Northland Greyhound Lines, Inc., of Illinois, operates its busses largely through the state of Wisconsin, except through the northwest portion, where the Northland Transportation Company has certain operations. . . . . 

The Northland Greyhound Lines, Inc., proposes to take over the routes now operated by the Northland Transportation Company, and the latter company is agreeable to assigning its rights to the Northland Greyhound Lines, Inc., of Illinois. Hearing was held in Madison on December 11, 1933. Both companies were represented by Mr. Stephens, of Stephens, Sletteland & Sutherland, Madison, Wisconsin.

Simplification of operation, economy in schedules and tariffs and reports are urged by the applicant as the reason for the desire to embrace all the operations of the two companies under one corporation. Both companies are controlled by one holding company. 

The Commission finds that the proposal is in the public interest and that the required authority should issue.

It is Therefore Ordered, That upon full compliance with the provisions of Chapter 488 of the Laws of 1933, authority for transfer of the certificates of the Northland Transportation Company, namely OS—3 and CC—6, to the Northland Greyhound Lines, Inc., of Illinois, be and the same is hereby given.”

It is unlikely that this company issued its own badges. It likely used either Northland Greyhound Lines badges, or The Greyhound Lines badges. More info needed on this subject.

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OHIO GREYHOUND LINES In 1935 the first Central Greyhound Lines was renamed Ohio Greyhound Lines to allow The Greyhound Corporation to reassign the name Central to a different subsidiary in the Midwest and the Northeast. In 1941, when the Great Lakes Greyhound Lines came into existence, The Greyhound Corporation merged the Ohio Greyhound Lines into the new Great Lakes Greyhound Lines. The Ohio Greyhound Lines ran between Detroit and Louisville via Toledo, Dayton, and Cincinnati, plus a detached route between Evansville and Indianapolis, Indiana. I’ve not encountered an Ohio Greyhound Lines badge.

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OVERLAND GREYHOUND LINES In 1943 two bus companies, Interstate Transit Lines and Union Pacific Stages, began operating under the name Overland Greyhound Lines. Union Pacific Stages was a bus subsidiary of Union Pacific Railroad, and Interstate Transit Lines, was a bus subsidiary jointly owned by the Union Pacific and Chicago & North Western Railway. When the name change occurred, Union Pacific still retained partial ownership. On October 1, 1952, The Greyhound Corporation bought out Interstate Transit Lines and Union Pacific Stages for cash and stock. Both companies were liquidated and succeeded by Overland Greyhound Lines. At that time Overland Greyhound had become an operating name of the Greyhound Corporation. On June 1, 1957, Pacific Greyhound Lines merged with Northwest Greyhound Lines and a segment of Overland Greyhound Lines to form Western Greyhound Lines. Badges: For the first badge style shown below there are no markings on the back, but it looks to be a design made by MAIER-LAVATY CO. CHICAGO. It is made of metal with painted blue enamel; measures 2 ½ X 2 ½ inches with two threaded posts. The second badge style below marked Overland Greyhound Lines and Union Pacific is an uncertainty. The collector who supplied the photos feels it may be a reproduction or a fantasy badge, perhaps because it looks news. It has a single threaded post and a pin post.

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Photos courtesy of kygelberhund.
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Photos used by permission of eBay member takebird.

PACIFIC GREYHOUND LINES, INC. The history of this company starts with the Southern Pacific Railroad, the West Coast railroad giant that served territories from Southern California north to Oregon. Following the initiatives of other railroad companies, SP formed a bus subsidiary in April 1927 named Southern Pacific Motor Transportation Company. On January 1, 1929, this company was reorganized as Pacific Transportation Securities, Inc. to consolidate SP’s motor bus operations with those of its principal competitors, the Pickwick and Greyhound corporations in the territory west of Salt Lake City and El Paso, and south of Portland. This company was reorganized under the laws of California on April 12, 1930, as Pacific Greyhound Corporation, and included a consolidation of the following motor bus lines: California Transit Company (aka Yelloway), Pickwick Stage System, Southern Pacific Motor Transport Co., Oregon Stages, Inc., Peninsula Rapid Transit Co., Pacific Auto Stages, Golden Gate Stages, Calistoga & Clear Lake Stage Co., Pacific Coast Motor Coach Co., Kern County Transportation Corp., Coast Auto Lines, Inc., Sierra Nevada Stages, Pacific Stages Inc., and Boyd Stage Line. The Mill Valley Record, Volume XXXII, Number 12, May 9, 1930, carried the story: “Motorcoach Lines In Consolidation Pacific Greyhound Lines To Include All Leading Regional Companies. Final steps to bring leading western motorcoach lines, already under one management, under a common operating name were taken last week when the Pacific Greyhound Lines, Inc., filed an application with the California State Railroad Commission to transfer operating rights of the various companies to the new corporation. According to T. B. Wilson, president of the Pacific Greyhound Lines, Inc., motorcoach companies which will be consolidated in the new operating company include the Pickwick Stages System, California Transit Co. Peninsula Rapid Transit Company, Pacific Auto Stages, Golden Gate Stages, Pacific Coast Motor Coach Company, Kern County Transportation Corp., Southern Pacific Motor Transport Company, Calistoga and Clear Lake Stage Company, Oregon Stages, Inc., Boyd Stage Lines, Coast Auto Lines, Transit Investment Company and Pacific Stages. ‘This consolidation of operating rights of the leading western motorcoach companies will do away with useless duplication and at the same time by coordination of service, increase the availability of direct travel in all directions,’ Wilson said. The Greyhound Lines headquarters are 9 Main St., San Francisco.” From 1930 to 1956 SP retained partial ownership of Pacific Greyhound Lines. Greyhound’s Western States operation was eventually divided into 3 companies, Pacific Greyhound Lines, Pickwick-Greyhound Lines Inc., and Southland Greyhound Lines, Inc. On June 1, 1957, Pacific Greyhound Lines merged with Northwest Greyhound Lines and a segment of Overland Greyhound Lines to form Western Greyhound Lines. There are four different badges known for this company: Type 2a, which is pictured below, was made by PASQUALE S.F. CAL., has a single threaded post and measures, 2 ½ X 2 ½ inches. Type 2b has two threaded posts is marked MAIER-LAVATY CO. CHICAGO and measures, 2 ½ X 2 ½ inches. The two variations of Type 3 badges, Type 3a and Type 3b. Both measure approximately 2 ½ X 2 ½ inches: the older badge, Type 3a, is made of solid cast nickel-plated brass with a number plate, while Type 3b is die pressed without a number plate. The fourth badge is Type 3c, is made of celluloid and has holes allowing it to be sewn onto a hat; it measures 2½” x 2½”.

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Type 2a badge. Photos used by permission of eBay member antiquegirl530.
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Type 3a badge. Photo courtesy of kygelberhund.
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Type 3b badge. Photos courtesy of kygelberhund.
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Type 3c badge. Photo courtesy of eBay member bessiebug05.
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Type 4 badge. Photo courtesy of kygelberhund.

PENNSYLVANIA GREYHOUND LINES In 1930 The Greyhound Corporation formed two new regional companies – the Pennsylvania Greyhound Lines (GL) and the (first) Central Greyhound Lines. The purpose of the Pennsylvania GL was to provide the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) a substitute bus service in place of some of its unprofitable and marginally profitable passenger trains. Greyhound then transferred the routes of the GLI of Indiana and the GLI of Ohio to the new companies. The east-west routes went to the Pennsylvania GL, as did the other ones paralleling other lines of the PRR. I’m not sure if this company issued its own badges, however, there is a service pin, which is shown below.

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Photos used by permission of eBay member rbr512.

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PICKWICK-GREYHOUND LINES / PICKWICK STAGE LINES / PICKWICK STAGES, INC. / PICKWICK CORPORATION In 1912 A. L. Hayes began an auto-bus company carrying passengers between San Diego and Escondido, California. In 1911 Charles Wesley Grise founded The Limited San Diego, Imperial Valley Auto Stage, that ran between San Diego and El Centro, California. In 1914 Hayes and Grise merged their operations and named their business Pickwick Stages. In 1917 Hayes bought out Grise’s share of the company and reorganized it as Pickwick Stage Line. In 1916 Charles F. Wren started an intercity line from San Diego to San Fernando and later to Santa Barbara and finally to San Francisco, California, and Portland, Oregon. A few years later Wren and Hayes consolidated their businesses, with Wren renaming his operation Pickwick Northern Division, Inc., with Hayes naming his operation (called the Southern operation) under the name Pickwick Stage, Inc. The two divisions were operating under the holding company Pickwick Corporation. The website COACHBUILT offers further information: “Both firms’ operations were publicly operated under the Pickwick Stage Line moniker. The 1922 (fiscal July 1, 1921- June 31, 1922) Report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners of the State of California contained the following information in regards to the Pickwick Stages:

“Pickwick Stages, Incorporated. A. L. Hayes. First and E streets., San Diego, California.

“Pickwick Stages, Northern Division, Incorporated. C. F. Wren, General Manager. 506 South Los Angeles street, Los Angeles.

“The Pickwick Stages, Northern Division, Incorporated, operating between Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Portland, reports the gross revenue of $888,847, total operating expenses in the sum of $330,005; or a net revenue of $8,842 on an investment of approximately $200,000 or a little in excess of 4 per cent.

“The Pickwick Corporation was organized under the laws of California on December 16, 1922 as a holding company to consolidate Wren’s various business enterprises. Soon after he reorganized Pickwick Stages’ Northern and Southern divisions as Pickwick Stages, Northern Division, Inc. and Pickwick Stages, Southern Division, Inc. Pickwick Corp.’s acquisition of wealth was rapid. During 1923 its stages carried 422,000 passengers with a total revenue of $1,364,317. By 1924 the line claims to have tripled the number of passengers carried to 1,174,000 passengers, producing a total revenue of $2,560,000. The corporation listed its assets at $2,000,000 with a reported profit of $325,000 in 1924.

In 1928 Pickwick entered a joint venture with Motor Transit Corporation, which was renamed The Greyhound Corporation in 1929-1930, to form Pickwick-Greyhound Lines. Greyhound historian Dr. D. B. “Doc” Rushing gives some background: “For a short time during 1927–28, there was also a third subsidiary (of the [Motor Transit Corporation] using the name of the Greyhound Lines, Inc. – the GLI of Delaware, which came into existence to buy the Purple Swan Safety Coach Lines, running between Chicago and Kansas City via Saint Louis (the two latter in Missouri), and which became renamed as the Pickwick-Greyhound Lines, after the Pickwick Corporation bought a one-half ownership interest in that firm (hence the hyphenated name).

Charles F. Wren also owned the Pickwick Motor Coach Works, Ltd., which was Pickwick’s in-house bus body builder. It was this company that introduced the famous Pickwick Nite Coach, which was designed and built by Pickwick’s designer and superintendent of body works, Dwight E. Austin in 1928. (These super coaches were sold to The Greyhound Corporation for use on a number of cross country routes and remain one of the most famous motor coaches of all time.) The demise of both Pickwick Stage Line and Pickwick-Greyhound Lines, is reported on UtahRails.com: “In February 1932, Pickwick Corporation of Los Angeles declared bankruptcy. At the time Pickwick was the largest intercity bus company in the United States. Beginning in 1927-1928, Pickwick had expanded, by way of public highways, from Portland to Los Angeles, and San Diego, and from Los Angeles to El Paso, and from El Paso to Kansas City and St. Louis. Many of the routes were operated in cooperation with Greyhound as a separate company known as Pickwick-Greyhound, which failed at the same time as Pickwick. . . . On February 9, 1932, Union Pacific Stages, as a subsidiary of Union Pacific Railroad, purchased the routes of Pickwick-Greyhound Lines, Inc. between Denver and Salt Lake City, and between Salt Lake City and Los Angeles.”

As to a Pickwick-Greyhound badges, there is nothing to say the company ever issued a badge. However, from a surviving photograph of a Pickwick Greyhound driver in full uniform, one can tell he’s wearing a badge on his hat. However, when enlarged, no detail can be made out. So we turn to signs and baggage labels of that era which depict a design exactly like that of Type 1 and Type 2 Greyhound badges. Although I’ve yet to see an actual Pickwick-Greyhound badge, if they were made, I’m assuming they would be like Type 1 & 2 badges, especially since other operating companies, such as Atlantic Greyhound and Pacific Greyhound, had badges that also matched their sign/logos. Included here is an old Pickwick Greyhound baggage label, which was affixed to a large metal trunk.

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RED CAP GREYHOUND LINES FYI from Wiktionary: “In sense of ‘porter’, 1890s US. On Labor Day, 1890, John Williams, an African-American railway porter, tied a red ribbon to his black uniform cap to stand out from the crowd at Grand Central Terminal. The strategy was so successful that it was soon adopted by others in the profession, leading to the synecdochic use of redcap as a term for all railway porters.” Whether or not this is true, the fact is that a “red cap” in the transportation industry refers to a baggage handler/porter, which means we can safely assume that this badge was worn by a porter in one of Greyhound’s larger terminals. The style of the badge is a type 1, which dates it to the 1930s. Since there are no known later styles of this badge, we may assume that it was a short-lived issue—making it one of the rarities in Greyhound badges! There are two known badge varieties. The first is made of brass with sky-blue, metallic-red, and copper-brown enamel inlay with black enamel numbering. The second variety is nickel-plated brass with sky-blue and metallic-red enamel inlay with black enamel numbering. Both badges have a pin & clasp back with no maker’s mark and measure approx. 2″ at its widest point, and a little over 2″ in length.

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A Greyhound Lines ad from the early 1940s showing a Greyhound Red Cap porter carrying passenger bags.
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Photo used by permission of William Morford at AntiqueAdvertising.com Auctions.
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Photos used by permission of eBay member gmccampbell.
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Photos courtesy of TRANSITBADGES.COM.
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Photos used by permission of eBay member grampahound10.

THE RICHMOND GREYHOUND LINES was a Greyhound regional operating company based in Richmond, Virginia. It ran from 1929 until 1960, when it was merged into the Eastern Greyhound Lines. The main predecessors of the Richmond Greyhound Lines are four different companies—the RF&P Transportation Company, the Richmond-Washington Motor Coaches, the Richmond-Norfolk Motor Coaches, and the Peninsula Transit Corporation. (The RF&P Transportation Company was the short-lived motor-coach subsidiary of the Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac (RF&P) Railroad.) Some more details are found in this March 27, 1959, article in the Progress-Index from Petersburg, Virginia: “The origin of Richmond Greyhound Lines, Inc., is similar in many ways to that of Atlantic Greyhound Corporation. The original Company was incorporated December 14, 1926, as Richmond-Washington Motor Coaches, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia. Operation began on December 15, 1926, between Washington D. C. and Richmond, Virginia, over US Highway No. 1. Under the date of April 24, 1929 an agreement was entered into between L. C. Major and Robert Lee May to sell the entire 75 shares of Richmond-Washington Motor Coaches’ stock outstanding to Motor Transit Corporation. On August 26, 1929, 49 per cent of the 75 shares were sold by Motor Transit Corporation to the Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad Company.” (Motor Transit Corporation was renamed The Greyhound Corporation in 1929/1930.) In August 1929, the R.F.& P. Transportation Co. and the competing Richmond-Washington Motor Coaches (owned by The Greyhound Company) merged to form the Richmond-Greyhound Lines, Inc.

As to a badge for The Richmond Greyhound Lines, I’ve never encountered one. They may, or may not exist.

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SOUTHLAND GREYHOUND LINES, INC. was incorporated in 1926 as Southland Red Ball Motor Bus Company and was renamed Southland Greyhound Lines in 1929. It was operating in 1929-1930 out of Abilene, Texas, and serving Cisco, Coleman, Ballinger, Ft. Worth, Big Spring and El Paso, Texas. In 1931 it’s bus station was located in the Grace Hotel in Abilene. In 1933 Southland Greyhound Lines was merged with Southwestern Transportation Company and Western Greyhound Lines to form Southwestern Greyhound Lines, Inc.

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SOUTHEASTERN GREYHOUND LINES had its start in 1926 as the Consolidated Coach Corporation, Inc. The ambitious management of Consolidated Coach Corp. expanded by buying out smaller regional bus lines. They set their sights on the Greyhound Lines of Georgia, which was a single-line company running between Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Jacksonville, Florida, via Atlanta and Macon, Georgia. (The Greyhound Lines of Georgia had started in 1928 as a subsidiary of the Motor Transit Corporation. In 1929/1930 the Motor Transit Corporation was renamed as The Greyhound Corporation.)

The Greyhound Corporation renamed the Greyhound Lines of Georgia as the Southeastern Greyhound Lines and in 1931 sold it to the Consolidated Coach Corporation. Consolidated Coach then began operating the Southeastern Greyhound Lines between Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Jacksonville, Florida, making connections for various points throughout Florida via the Florida Motor Lines, which in 1946, was renamed the Florida Greyhound Lines and which, in 1957, was merged into the Southeastern Greyhound Lines. After the 1931 acquisition, Consolidated Coach operated all its buses under the Southeastern Greyhound Lines name, with the notation on ads and buses alike “Consolidated Coach Lines.” 

It’s worth mentioning that there is a slightly different version of the company’s history, as related in a September 10, 1931, Associated Press article found in numerous newspapers of the day:

“(AP) C. C. C. Line Changed to ‘Southeastern Greyhound’ Atlanta, Ga., Sept 10 [1931] J. P. Pope, vice-president of the Southeastern Greyhound lines, announced today that all lines of the Consolidated Coach Corporation, recently acquired by the former company and operating in Kentucky, Georgia, Alabama and Tennessee, will be operated under the system name of ‘Southeastern Greyhound Lines.’ The System operated out of Lexington, Ky. and covers routes totally 5,222 miles.”

The above says that Southeastern Greyhound acquired Consolidated Coach, not the other way around. However, page 7 of the Friday, September 11, 1931, edition of The Atlanta Constitution from Atlanta, Georgia reported facts that match the accepted history of Southeastern Greyhound:

“Coach Company to Unify System. The Consolidated Coach Corporation, which recently acquired the Southeastern Greyhound Lines, operating between Atlanta, Jacksonville and Chattanooga, will unify its system, and identify all of its branches under the name of the Southeastern Greyhound Lines, according to J. P. Pope, vice president. The new chain will cover 5,222 miles, the 250 busses serving Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia and Florida.”

Within a week of the above article, countless ads appeared with this information:

“SEPTEMBER FIFTEENTH will be a red letter day in the history of Southern- transportation. The South’s largest bus lines, The Consolidated Coach Corporation, Inc., Southeastern Greyhound Lines, Inc Union Transfer Company, Inc, and Alabama Bus Company, Inc will operate under ONE great name. Southeastern Greyhound Lines, offering through service from the Ohio to Florida and the Gulf, will give you all the advantages of being able to go almost anywhere in the Southeast over one great transportation system . . . better service, greater dependability and the height of travel comfort. Southeastern Greyhound Lines will offer frequent service to point In Kentucky, Tennessee, Ohio, Georgia, Alabama and Florida, bringing the favorite vacation spots to your very door … the Blue Grass country . . . the mountains … the lake resorts . . . and the Gulf of Mexico. The combined Greyhound Lines serve 47 of the 48 states of the Union, part of Canada and Old Mexico. From COAST TO COAST BORDER TO BORDER, you need not change lines. A single high standard of service gives you everything you could wish in modern motor bus travel. Ask your nearest agent for the fare and schedule to your favorite resort, learn how surprisingly low the cost is by motor coach.”

(See Consolidated Coach Corporation for more detailed information.) Pictured below are an early Type 1b and a later Type 3a badge. 

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Photos used by permission of eBay member mikescollectibles2014.

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SOUTHERN KANSAS GREYHOUND LINES incorporated in 1932 as joint operation with Southern Kansas Stage Lines, it had previously operated a service competing with Pickwick-Greyhound Lines. Pickwick routes were transferred to Southern Kansas Greyhound Lines after its formation. Reorganized in 1970 as Kansas Greyhound Lines. I’ve not seen any badges for this company.

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SOUTHWESTERN GREYHOUND LINES, INC. was formed/incorporated in 1933 as merger of Western Greyhound Lines, Southland Greyhound Lines and Southwestern Transportation Company.

Background before the 1933 merger: Pickwick-Greyhound Lines, which had been formed in 1928 as a company jointly owned by Pickwick Stages and Greyhound, and fully owned by Greyhound in 1932, was renamed in 1932 as Western Greyhound Lines. St. Louis Southwestern Railroad (also known as “The Cotton Belt Route” and “Cotton Belt“) was the parent company of Southwestern Transportation Company and after the 1933 merger with Greyhound, had partial ownership of Southwestern Greyhound Lines until 1958. Southland Greyhound Lines, Inc. was incorporated in 1926 as Southland Red Ball Motor Bus Company and was renamed Southland Greyhound Lines in 1929.

Southwestern Greyhound continued operating as a regional operating company until 1960 when it was consolidated into the Central Division of Greyhound. The known badges are Type 2b examples, and were made by MAIER-LAVATY CO. CHICAGO. (Note: some of these badges have no maker’s mark, but they are identical to the Maier-Lavaty Co. badges.)

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Photos used by permission of eBay member tdod72.
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Photos courtesy of kygelberhund. 
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10k service pin made by L.G. BALFOUR COMPANY, INC.,
ATTLEBORO, MASS. Photo courtesy of kygelberhund.

THE TECHE GREYHOUND LINES (pronounced as “tesh”) This company had its origin with the Teche Transfer Company, which was incorporated in Louisiana in April 1920 to operate buses between Jeanerette and New Iberia (a distance of about 10 miles in the region west of New Orleans and Baton Rouge and southeast of Lafayette). In 1929 the Teche Transfer Company was renamed the Teche Lines. The next part of the story involves Oliver William Townsend, who was one of the founders of YellowaY Lines running out of Nebraska and which was bought out by American Motor Transportation Company in 1928, which, in turn, was bought out by The Greyhound Corporation in 1929. Townsend moved to New Orleans, Louisiana, in 1932 and bought a controlling interest in Teche Lines. With Townsend at the helm, Greyhound bought into Teche and, in 1934, bought a controlling interest in the company. Greyhound then renamed Teche Lines as Teche-Greyhound Lines. The 1936 Russell’s National Motor Coach Guide shows Teche Greyhound Lines headquartered on 400 North Rampart St. in New Orleans, Louisiana. It served Birmingham and Tuscaloosa, Alabama, Meridian and Hattiesburg, Mississippi, New Orleans, Marianna, Mobile, and Lake Charles, Louisanna. In 1939 Greyhound bought all of Townsend’s interest in Teche Greyhound Lines; in 1941 Greyhound merged Teche Greyhound Lines into The Greyhound Corporation. However, Oliver O. Townsend remained as chairman of the board of Teche Greyhound Lines and was still listed as such in the 1954 MTD; that year the company was running 235 buses over 2391 route miles. In 1954 Teche Greyhound Lines, along with the Dixie Greyhound Lines, was merged into the Southeastern Greyhound Lines. Oliver W. Townsend died in New Orleans in November 1955. (See YellowaY Lines for more information.)

The Type 1c badge below was made by Maier-Lavaty Company and has two threaded posts. It is one of the rarest Greyhound badges known and examples seldom surface.

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Photo courtesy of kygelberhund.

WESTERN GREYHOUND LINES had been renamed in 1932 from Pickwick-Greyhound Lines, which had been formed in 1928 as a company jointly owned by Pickwick Stages and Greyhound Lines, Inc., and was fully owned by Greyhound in 1932. In 1933 Southwestern Greyhound Lines, Inc. was formed by a merger of Western Greyhound Lines, Southland Greyhound Lines and Southwestern Transportation Company. I’ve not seen any badges for this Greyhound company.

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RELATED GREYHOUND COMPANIES AND THEIR BADGES

For the serious Greyhound collector, it isn’t just about Greyhound badges. As any Greyhound buff knows, the corporation’s history is made up of a maze of bought-out operating companies. Going further, if one researches the histories of these bought-out companies, they find that many of these had bought out and absorbed smaller competitors who had often done the same to their competitors. And so, if one truly wants a complete Greyhound badge collection, they need to seek out badges from the maze of transit companies in Greyhound’s pedigree.  Some example are found below.


BLUE GOOSE LINES, INC. was one of those companies that is in The Greyhound Corporation’s pedigree. However, it’s a tad bit complicated trying to untangle the history—but, here goes: First we can find an outline posted on Wikipedia that relates that the Detroit United Railway Company (DURC) formed a highway-coach subsidiary, People’s Motor Coach Company in 1924. The article goes on to tie the DURC to the Blue Goose Lines, but we’ll come back to that a bit later.

Now, let’s meet Ralph A.L. Bogan, one of the three original owners of the Mesaba Transportation Company, which was formed on December 17, 1915, and which would one day became The Greyhound Corporation.

On January 6, 1923, the Janesville Daily Gazette (from Janesville, Wisconsin) reported that Bogan, along with partner Swan Sundstrom, had bought one of Fageol Motors big buses for his Gray Motor Stage Line, which was operating in Wisconsin:

Gray Motor Stage Line Adds $9,000 Bus “Attractive Car, Well-Equipped, Makes First Run to Water town. Because of constantly increasing business, the Gray Motor Stage Lines have added a new bus, which arrived from Oakland, Cal., Wednesday and has been put into operation, on the motor route between Janesville and Watertown, making three trips a day. The bus is designed for comfort, safety, and is attractive in appearance. Costing $8,000 at the Oakland factory of Fageol-Scott-Motors Company, and $9.000 by the time it reached here, the bus is an immense and beautiful car with a wheel-base of 218 inches and a 70-inch axle length. It has capacity for 23 people and is outfitted with leather seats, each holding four people. The interior is upholstered in brown leather, has electric lights and a heater, which, with the heavy springs, give the comfort of a railroad car. It is equipped with plate glass windows. The outside is done in light blue, with a streak of white about the body. The center of gravity is so low that it is said the bus can make a right angle corner, loaded, at 45 miles per hour, with safety.”

The new bus has been christened the ‘Blue Goose’. It made its first run Thursday night. Others similar will be added to the line later, Swan Sundstrom, one of the partners says.

So, Ralph Bogan used the service name “Blue Goose” as early as 1923 for his Gray Motor Stage Line.

Now back to the DURC and Wikipedia. According to the article in 1924 the DURC bought another of Bogan’s companies—the Detroit-Toledo Transportation Company, and after the sale, the DURC used both the name and image of Bogan’s blue goose for its entire intercity bus system. (Information from the Wikipedia article Great Lakes Greyhound Lines.) I’ve not found this information outside the Wikipedia article, however there are references of a Blue Goose Lines, Inc. running in Michigan and Indiana in the 1930s-1940s. (January 1, 1940, edition of The Times Herald from Port Huron, Michigan.) Further, this Blue Goose Lines, Inc. was supposedly absorbed by The Greyhound Corporation, which would seem to make it one and the same with the above Blue Goose Lines.

At any rate, that’s where we shall leave this.

Apparently, the company used only embroidered cloth badges on their hats and uniforms.

blue goose 1
Image © Copyright 2003-2015 Coachbuilt.com, Inc. All rights reserved. Used by permission.
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A hat and sleeve badge on a 1930-ear photo of Blue Goose Lines driver George R. Oatley. Photos used by permission of kygerlberhund, who owns the original Oatley photograph. 

CROWN COACH LINES was a Greyhound subcontractor operating from Joplin, Missouri from 1930 until 1966: “Friday, October 14, 1966: Louis N. Zelle, president of Jefferson Lines of Minneapolis, and Claude E. Brown, president of Crown Coach Company, Joplin, Mo., announced today that Jefferson Lines has concluded negotiations with the stockholders of Crown Coach Company, to acquire the Brown family interests in Crown. Greyhound Lines, a minority stockholder of Crown Coach, has been associated with the Brown family since 1930 and will continue the same association with the new owners.” The badge measures approx. 3″ which is ½” more than the other Type 1 Greyhound badges. (Also, it’s worth mentioning that I’ve seen about a half dozen of these badges and none had a number stamped onto it.)

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Photo used by permission of eBay member lectronicslad.

NORTH COAST LINES / NORTH COAST TRANSPORTATION COMPANY This company’s history starts in Seattle, Washington, with Stone & Webster Management Company, which was founded in Boston by engineer-entrepreneurs Charles A. Stone and Edwin S. Webster. By 1899 Stone & Webster’s subsidiary, Seattle Electric Company, owned the city’s 22 streetcar lines. These were consolidated into the Puget Sound Traction, Light & Power Company, which succeeded the Seattle Electric Company. This company built an interurban line from Seattle to Tacoma, which it called the Puget Sound Electric Railway, commencing service on September 25, 1902. In 1912, Stone & Webster created another subsidiary, Pacific Northwest Traction Company. In 1926 this company created a bus subsidiary called the North Coast Transportation Company. In 1927 North Coast Transportation Company introduced motor buses to shuttle passengers between terminals, and integrated bus and rail service known as the North Coast Lines. In turn, sometime in the 1930s the North Coast Lines set up a subsidiary named THE $4.00 LINE PORTLAND – SEATTLE. In 1932 North Coast Lines served Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Seattle, Tacoma, Bellingham, Everett, Olympia, Aberdeen, Centralia, Chehalis, Kelso, Longview and Vancouver, Washington, from whence it ran into Portland, Oregon. The company was known for buying the unique Kenworth “double-decker” highway coaches for their operations. In 1946, federal regulators ordered Puget Sound Traction, Light & Power to divest North Coast Lines, ending the company’s involvement in interurban transportation. The company was sold to The Greyhound Corporation in October 1948 for over $2 million. The sale included the company’s large bus terminal in downtown Seattle, which thereafter became the Greyhound Bus Terminal. Following the sale the company’s name was changed to North Coast Greyhound Lines, but in 1950 that company was consolidated into Northwest Greyhound Lines, Inc. The cloisonne badge is made of brass with a single threaded post, and measures 2″ in diameter. It is considered a rarity among badge collectors.

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Photo used by permission of eBay member iconrelicsaz.
north coast
Images from a 1932 North Coast schedule. Courtesy of kygelberhund.

SAFETY MOTOR COACH LINES was founded by Edwin Ekstrom (1889-1967), who was one of those who figure in the pedigree of the The Greyhound Corporation. (Ekstrom was an investor and participant in the Mesaba Transportation Company, which replaced the Hibbing Transportation Company, founded by Carl Eric Wickman, Ralph Bogan and other pioneers of The Greyhound CorporationClick here for a detailed history of Edwin Ekstrom and the early Greyhound company.)

In 1923 Ekstrom acquired a controlling interest in the Eastern Wisconsin Transportation Company, which ran between Madison and Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. In 1924 Carl Eric Wickman backed Edwin Ekstrom in founding the Safety Motor Coach Lines. His first two buses were Fageol Safety Coaches, which was the reason for Ekstrom’s choice of company names. They ran between Muskegon and Grand Rapids, Michigan, and, in the coming months, expanded into nearby Illinois and Indiana. It was Ekstrom who first used the name “Greyhound” which he painted on the sides of his gray Fageol Safety Coaches. This followed by his used of a running greyhound dog logo superimposed on a ring and the words “Greyhounds of the Highway”. (In time, the logo became part of the Greyhound Lines and was used by all Greyhound operating companies as late as the 1980s.) In October 1926 Ekstrom and partners, including Carl Eric Wickman, formed the Motor Transit Corporation, a holding company which acquired Safety Motor Coach Lines along with Interstate Stages, Yelloway of Michigan and Southwestern Michigan Motor Coach Co. All the newly-acquired companies were consolidated into Safety Motor Coach Lines. In 1930 the Motor Transit Corp. changed its name to The Greyhound Corporation, and Safety Motor Coach Lines was renamed Eastern Greyhound Lines of Michigan.

logo
Safety Motor Coach Lines logo, which would evolved into the Greyhound Lines’ logo. 

WASHINGTON MOTOR COACH SYSTEM / NORTHWEST GREYHOUND LINES, INC.  Washington Motor Coach System was formed in 1925 by combining the certificates of a number of smaller companies. In January 1938 WMCS significantly expanded when it merged with the Yakima Motor Coach Company, Inc., the Olympic Motor Coach Company, Inc., and the Spokane-Butte Motor Coach Company, Inc., faithfully serving Washington, Idaho and Montana. On Tuesday, February 25, 1947, The Greyhound Corporation announced it had acquired control of the Washington Motor Coach System, which was then operating in four Pacific northwest states. Greyhound president Orville S. Caesar announced that 96 per cent of WMCS’ outstanding stock was purchased. At the acquisition the name of the company was changed from Washington Motor Coach System to Northwest Greyhound Lines, Inc., with Clifford E. Graves serving as president. The purchase also included WMCS’s depot located at 8th and Stewart Streets in Seattle. WMCS’s drivers, managers and other staff became part of Greyhound. So here you have four transit companies in the Northwest Greyhound pedigree, and more opportunities to collect badges! Below are two examples of a WMCS badge. The first one is the earliest, and is made of solid nickel with a single threaded post and measures 1¼”. The second has a single threaded post, is made of sterling silver and cloisonné enamel by the Robbins Co. Attleboro, MA. and measures approx. 2¼”.

w36
Photos used by permission of eBay member oldsawmill.
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Above is a sterling silver badge of the WMCS. Below is a part of a WMCS schedule showing the logos of both the WMCS and Greyhound. Photos above and below are courtesy of kygelberhund.

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b6
Above is a belt buckle for a WMCS driver.  Photo courtesy of kygelberhund.

YELLOWAY LINES / YELLOWAY PIONEER SYSTEM  Oliver William Townsend was born December 22, 1893 in Pauline, Nebraska; he died November 1955 in New Orleans, Lousiana at the age of 62 years, where he was serving as chairman of the board of Teche Greyhound Lines. Townsend began in the bus industry in 1924 and went on to found the Cornhusker Stage Line, which was based in Hastings, Nebraska. The company ran a route between Hastings and Lincoln. In 1927 Townsend joined with other independent bus companies to form YellowaY Lines. (Note the upper case “Y” at the end of YellowaY.) Under the YellowaY name Townsend ran routes across Nebraska between Chicago, Illinois, and Denver, Colorado. In 1928 Townsend sold some of his operating rights to the newly formed American Motor Transportation Company, based in Oakland, California. This company went on to buy out most  of the other independent YellowaY member firms, and operated them as the YellowaY-Pioneer System. On September 11, 1928 this company made history when a Yelloway-Pioneer System bus completed the first regularly scheduled coast-to-coast bus trip in the USA, running from Los Angeles to New York City.

In 1929 the Motor Transit Corporation (which became The Greyhound Corporation later that year) bought the Yelloway-Pioneer System for $6.4 million. The February 15, 1929, edition of The Daily Notes from Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, reported the story: “Consolidation of the Yelloway lines and ‘the Greyhound lines, bus companies, with a combined investment of more than $12,000,000, was announced here today by O. S. Caesar, president of the Motor Transit corporation, and W. F. Travis, president of the American Motor Transportation company. Tho two lines will be united under the name of the American Motor Transit corporation, to form the largest long distance bus transportation system in the country, officials said.” (Information for this history was gleaned from Wikepedia, which uses a history submitted by Dr. D.B. “Doc” Rushing from his history of Teche Greyhound Lines; also used were Images of America Hastings the Queen City of the Plains by Monty McCord, 2001, and the 1940 US Census, the US Selective Service records and the following from the November 21, 1955, edition of Beatrice Daily Sun from Beatrice, Nebraska: “Oliver Townsend, New Orleans, La. passed away last week at the age of 62 years. He was a former Barneston resident. His sisters, Mrs. Fred Whittcomb and Mrs. James L. McCorory, Omaha went to New Orleans with their brother Harold Townsend, Oak Ridge, Tenn., to attend the services there. Services were also held in Omaha. Interment was made in Omaha.” The badge is die pressed nickel and has two threaded posts.

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A site about collecting transit badges and discovering the histories of the companies that issued them.

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